Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So I'm going to talk to you about you about the political chemistry of oil spills

    翻訳: Kazuyuki Shimatani 校正: Masaki Yanagishita

  • and why this is an incredibly important,

    石油流出の政治的側面についてお話します

  • long, oily, hot summer,

    それが非常に重要である理由について

  • and why we need to keep ourselves from getting distracted.

    長く ギトギトした 暑い夏について

  • But before I talk about the political chemistry,

    そして

  • I actually need to talk about the chemistry of oil.

    この問題に注意しなければならない理由を 話します

  • This is a photograph from when I visited

    政治的側面についてお話しする前に

  • Prudhoe Bay in Alaska in 2002

    石油そのものについてお話しなくてはなりません

  • to watch the Minerals Management Service

    2002年に アラスカのプルドー湾に行った際に

  • testing their ability

    撮影した写真です

  • to burn oil spills in ice.

    鉱物資源管理部が 氷の中で

  • And what you see here is, you see a little bit of crude oil,

    流出した石油を燃やすことができるか

  • you see some ice cubes,

    確認していたので 見に行ったのです

  • and you see two sandwich baggies of napalm.

    この写真には 原油に加えて

  • The napalm is burning there quite nicely.

    氷の塊も写っています

  • And the thing is, is that

    ナパームを入れた袋がふたつ見えます

  • oil is really an abstraction for us as the American consumer.

    ナパームは上手く燃焼しています

  • We're four percent of the world's population;

    そして 石油とは

  • we use 25 percent of the world's oil production.

    我々 米国の消費者にとっての象徴です

  • And we don't really understand what oil is,

    我々は世界の人口の4%に過ぎませんが

  • until you check out its molecules,

    石油製品の25%を消費しています

  • And you don't really understand that until you see this stuff burn.

    石油とは何か 理解するためには

  • So this is what happens as that burn gets going.

    その分子構造を知らなくてはなりません

  • It takes off. It's a big woosh.

    燃えているところを見なくては 真に理解はできません

  • I highly recommend that you get a chance to see crude oil burn someday,

    石油が燃えるときの様子です

  • because you will never need to hear another poli sci lecture

    燃えさかり 大きな音をたてています

  • on the geopolitics of oil again.

    機会があれば ぜひ原油が燃えるところをご覧になって下さい

  • It'll just bake your retinas.

    石油に関して これ以上の政治学や地政学の

  • So there it is; the retinas are baking.

    講義を聴く必要はありません

  • Let me tell you a little bit about this chemistry of oil.

    網膜に焼き付きます

  • Oil is a stew of hydrocarbon molecules.

    ほら 網膜に焼き付いていますね

  • It starts of with the very small ones,

    それでは 化学的側面についてお話ししましょう

  • which are one carbon, four hydrogen --

    石油とはシチュー状態の炭化水素分子です

  • that's methane -- it just floats off.

    ごく小さな分子である

  • Then there's all sorts of intermediate ones with middle amounts of carbon.

    一個の炭素と四個の水素で構成されている

  • You've probably heard of benzene rings; they're very carcinogenic.

    メタンも含まれます メタンは簡単に蒸発します

  • And it goes all the way over

    炭素を含んだあらゆる種類の中間体が 存在しています

  • to these big, thick, galumphy ones that have hundreds of carbons,

    ベンゼン環はご存じでしょう 発がん性があります

  • and they have thousands of hydrogens,

    そして最終的には

  • and they have vanadium and heavy metals and sulfur

    こういった大きく ドロドロした物体があります

  • and all kinds of craziness hanging off the sides of them.

    これは数百の炭素原子と数千の水素原子

  • Those are called the asphaltenes; they're an ingredient in asphalt.

    バナジウムと重金属 硫黄でできており

  • They're very important in oil spills.

    その他の物質がその周囲に付いています

  • Let me tell you a little bit about

    アスファルテンと呼ばれ アスファルトの材料になります

  • the chemistry of oil in water.

    石油流出事故の時に問題となります

  • It is this chemistry that makes oil so disastrous.

    水中での 石油の

  • Oil doesn't sink, it floats.

    化学についてお話しします

  • If it sank, it would be a whole different story as far as an oil spill.

    この化学特性が石油を厄介なものにしています

  • And the other thing it does is it spreads out the moment it hits the water.

    石油は沈みまず 水に浮きます

  • It spreads out to be really thin,

    沈む物質であれば石油流出事故の時には 状況は違うでしょう

  • so you have a hard time corralling it.

    もう一つの特性として 水に接触したとたんに パッと広がるという点があります

  • The next thing that happens

    極薄く広がります

  • is the light ends evaporate,

    そのため石油を封じ込めるのは難しいのです

  • and some of the toxic things float into the water column

    その次に起こることは

  • and kill fish eggs

    軽い物質が蒸発して

  • and smaller fish and things like that, and shrimp.

    有毒な成分が水中に溶け込み

  • And then the asphaltenes -- and this is the crucial thing --

    魚の卵を殺します

  • the asphaltenes get whipped by the waves

    小魚やエビにも被害をもたらします

  • into a frothy emulsion, something like mayonnaise.

    そしてアスファルテン この物質が致命的なのです

  • It triples the amount

    アスファルテンは波でホイップされます

  • of oily, messy goo that you have in the water,

    泡状の マヨネーズのようになります

  • and it makes it very hard to handle.

    3倍に膨らみ

  • It also makes it very viscous.

    水中で 油のどろどろが出来上がります

  • When the Prestige sank off the coast of Spain,

    これが処理を厄介なものにします

  • there were big, floating cushions the size of sofa cushions

    非常に粘性のある物質になっています

  • of emulsified oil,

    プレステージ号がスペイン沖に沈んだとき

  • with the consistency, or the viscosity, of chewing gum.

    石油が乳化して クッション大の物質になり

  • It's incredibly hard to clean up.

    チューインガムと同程度の堅さ 粘性を持ち

  • And every single oil is different when it hits water.

    水上を漂っていました

  • When the chemistry of the oil and water

    処理はたいへんな仕事です

  • also hits our politics,

    水中に入った石油は それぞれ全く異なった動きをします

  • it's absolutely explosive.

    石油と水の化学が

  • For the first time, American consumers

    政治にも影響を与えたとき

  • will kind of see the oil supply chain in front of themselves.

    それは爆発的なものとなります

  • They have a "eureka!" moment,

    米国の消費者は はじめて

  • when we suddenly understand oil in a different context.

    石油のサプライチェーンが自分たちに 影響していることを知ることになります

  • So I'm going to talk just a little bit about the origin of these politics,

    「解った!」瞬間というわけです

  • because it's really crucial to understanding

    石油を今までとは異なったコンテクストで 理解しはじめます

  • why this summer is so important, why we need to stay focused.

    こういった政治の始まりについて 少しお話ししましょう

  • Nobody gets up in the morning and thinks,

    どうしても理解しておかなければなりません

  • "Wow! I'm going to go buy

    この夏がなぜ重要であったか 関心を失ってはならないかを理解するためです

  • some three-carbon-to-12-carbon molecules to put in my tank

    朝起きたときに

  • and drive happily to work."

    「さあ!C3 - C12構造の分子を買って

  • No, they think, "Ugh. I have to go buy gas.

    タンクを満タンにしてから ウキウキ仕事へ向かおう」

  • I'm so angry about it. The oil companies are ripping me off.

    などと考える人はいません

  • They set the prices, and I don't even know.

    「ちぇ!ガソリンを買わなくちゃ

  • I am helpless over this."

    たまらないなぁ 石油会社はぼってるね

  • And this is what happens to us at the gas pump --

    価格を決めるのは彼等で 私は関われない

  • and actually, gas pumps are specifically designed

    どうしようもないな」と考えるでしょう

  • to diffuse that anger.

    ガソリンスタンドではいつも そうです

  • You might notice that many gas pumps, including this one,

    実際 ガソリンスタンドは そういった怒りを発散させるよう

  • are designed to look like ATMs.

    特別なデザインがされているのです

  • I've talked to engineers. That's specifically to diffuse our anger,

    このようなガソリンスタンドは

  • because supposedly we feel good about ATMs.

    ATMに似せてあります

  • (Laughter)

    設計者と話しましたが この形が怒りを発散させるのだそうです

  • That shows you how bad it is.

    ATMを悪く思う人はいませんから

  • But actually, I mean, this feeling of helplessness

    (笑い)

  • comes in because most Americans actually feel

    状況が分かっていただけるでしょう

  • that oil prices are the result of a conspiracy,

    でも実際 この無力感は

  • not of the vicissitudes of the world oil market.

    石油価格は陰謀によって決まっており

  • And the thing is, too,

    世界市場の影響で決まっているのではないと

  • is that we also feel very helpless about the amount that we consume,

    多くの米国人が感じていることに発しています

  • which is somewhat reasonable,

    そして また

  • because in fact, we have designed this system

    我々の消費量についても 非常な無力感を感じています

  • where, if you want to get a job,

    それは ある程度は正当な感情なのです

  • it's much more important to have a car that runs,

    我々が作り出した現在のシステムでは

  • to have a job and keep a job, than to have a GED.

    仕事に就こうとすれば

  • And that's actually very perverse.

    きちんと走る車を持っていることが

  • Now there's another perverse thing about the way we buy gas,

    高校卒業資格よりずっと大切なのです

  • which is that we'd rather be doing anything else.

    奇妙な状況です

  • This is BP's gas station

    ガソリンを買う時にも 奇妙なことがあります

  • in downtown Los Angeles.

    ガソリンを買いたいと思っているわけではない ということです

  • It is green. It is a shrine to greenishness.

    BPのガソリンスタンドです

  • "Now," you think, "why would something so lame

    ロサンジェルスの市街地にあります

  • work on people so smart?"

    緑色です グリーンの聖地です

  • Well, the reason is, is because, when we're buying gas,

    「こんな子供だましが なぜ

  • we're very invested in this sort of cognitive dissonance.

    うまく いっているのだろう」と思うでしょう

  • I mean, we're angry at the one hand and we want to be somewhere else.

    私たちが石油を購入する時には まさに

  • We don't want to be buying oil;

    認知的不協和に陥っているからです

  • we want to be doing something green.

    一方で怒りを感じながら もう一方では 別の何かを行いたいと考えています

  • And we get kind of in on our own con.

    石油を買うこと以外の何か

  • I mean -- and this is funny,

    つまり環境に優しい行いをしたいと 考えているのです

  • it looks funny here.

    自分自身を騙すのに一役買うことになります

  • But in fact, that's why the slogan "beyond petroleum" worked.

    おかしな状況でしょう

  • But it's an inherent part of our energy policy,

    おかしな状況だと思います

  • which is we don't talk about

    しかし このおかげで「脱石油」のスローガンが 広まったのです

  • reducing the amount of oil that we use.

    これはエネルギー政策に特有の部分ですが

  • We talk about energy independence. We talk about hydrogen cars.

    石油消費量の削減については

  • We talk about biofuels that haven't been invented yet.

    私たちは話題にしません

  • And so, cognitive dissonance

    エネルギーへの非依存性についてや 水素自動車について

  • is part and parcel of the way that we deal with oil,

    まだ発明されていないバイオ燃料について 話題にします

  • and it's really important to dealing with this oil spill.

    つまり 認知的不協和は

  • Okay, so the politics of oil

    石油と付き合っていく上での 一部分を構成しているのです

  • are very moral in the United States.

    石油流出に対応するためには 非常に重要な事項です

  • The oil industry is like a huge, gigantic octopus

    米国において 石油政策は

  • of engineering and finance

    まさに道徳的となっています

  • and everything else,

    石油産業は巨大であり 巨大タコのように

  • but we actually see it in very moral terms.

    技術や財務 その他様々な部門をもった

  • This is an early-on photograph -- you can see, we had these gushers.

    強大な組織から成っています

  • Early journalists looked at these spills,

    しかし我々はこの産業を道徳的観点から見ます

  • and they said, "This is a filthy industry."

    初期の写真ですが このような油田を使っていました

  • But they also saw in it

    こういった油田を 最初に取材したジャーナリストは

  • that people were getting rich for doing nothing.

    「不潔な産業だ」と言いました

  • They weren't farmers, they were just getting rich for stuff coming out of the ground.

    それはまた 何もしないで金持ちになってゆく人々を

  • It's the "Beverly Hillbillies," basically.

    思っての言葉でもあったのです

  • But in the beginning, this was seen as a very morally problematic thing,

    農民ではないのに

  • long before it became funny.

    地面からわき出す物を利用して 豊かになっているのです

  • And then, of course, there was John D. Rockefeller.

    たいていは「ビバリーヒルズの住人」です

  • And the thing about John D. is that

    しかし初期には これは道徳的に問題だと考えられていました

  • he went into this chaotic wild-east

    奇妙なことになるずっと以前のことです

  • of oil industry,

    そして ジョン D ロックフェラーが現れました

  • and he rationalized it

    彼は この混沌としたワイルド イースト

  • into a vertically integrated company, a multinational.

    石油産業に参入したのです

  • It was terrifying; you think Walmart is a terrifying business model now,

    そして その産業を

  • imagine what this looked like in the 1860s or 1870s.

    合理化しました

  • And it also the kind of root

    企業を統合し 多国籍化したのです

  • of how we see oil as a conspiracy.

    恐るべきことでした 現在ではウォールマートが 恐るべき

  • But what's really amazing is that

    ビジネスモデルですが その1860や1870年代版というわけです

  • Ida Tarbell, the journalist,

    石油を陰謀だと考える

  • went in and did a big exposé of Rockefeller

    根本原因はここにあります

  • and actually got the whole antitrust laws

    ジャーナリストのアイダ ターベルが

  • put in place.

    ロックフェラーについて

  • But in many ways,

    話題となった暴露記事を書き

  • that image of the conspiracy still sticks with us.

    その結果 独占禁止法が

  • And here's one of the things

    導入されることになったのです

  • that Ida Tarbell said --

    しかし 様々の意味で

  • she said, "He has a thin nose like a thorn.

    陰謀のイメージが まだ払拭されていません

  • There were no lips.

    アイダ ターベルが書いたものの

  • There were puffs under the little colorless eyes

    一部を紹介します

  • with creases running from them."

    「トゲのように 細い鼻