Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • We're 25, 26 years after

    翻訳: Yasushi Aoki 校正: Masahiro Kyushima

  • the advent of the Macintosh,

    25、6年前の

  • which was an astoundingly seminal event

    Macintoshの出現は

  • in the history

    マン マシン インタフェースや

  • of human-machine interface

    コンピュータ全般の歴史の中で

  • and in computation in general.

    驚くほど大きな

  • It fundamentally changed the way

    出来事でした

  • that people thought about computation,

    コンピュータや計算に対する

  • thought about computers,

    人々の考えを

  • how they used them and who and how many people were able to use them.

    根本的に変えました

  • It was such a radical change, in fact,

    誰が どれだけの人が どんな風に使えるかを 変えたのです

  • that the early Macintosh development team

    それは非常に大きな変化であり

  • in '82, '83, '84

    実際1982年から84年頃の

  • had to write an entirely new operating system from the ground up.

    初期のMacintosh開発チームは

  • Now, this is an interesting little message,

    新しいオペレーティングシステムを一から作る必要がありました

  • and it's a lesson that has since, I think,

    そこには興味深い小さな教訓があったのですが

  • been forgotten or lost or something,

    その教訓はその後忘れ去られ

  • and that is, namely, that the OS is the interface.

    消えてしまったように見えます

  • The interface is the OS.

    それはつまり OSとはインタフェースであり

  • It's like the land and the king (i.e. Arthur) they're inseparable, they are one.

    インタフェースとはOSである ということです

  • And to write a new operating system was not a capricious matter.

    アーサー王物語における国と王のように 両者は不可分なものなのです

  • It wasn't just a matter of tuning up some graphics routines.

    新しいOSを作るというのは 気まぐれでできるようなことではありませんでした

  • There were no graphics routines. There were no mouse drivers.

    グラフィックスルーチンをチューンナップすれば済む話ではありません

  • So it was a necessity.

    グラフィックスルーチンもなければ マウスドライバもなかったのです

  • But in the quarter-century since then,

    すべて作る必要がありました

  • we've seen all of the fundamental

    しかしその後の4半世紀の間に

  • supporting technologies go berserk.

    基本技術の狂ったような発展を

  • So memory capacity and disk capacity

    私たちは目にしました

  • have been multiplied by something between 10,000 and a million.

    メモリ容量とディスク容量は

  • Same thing for processor speeds.

    1万倍とか100万倍というスケールで拡大しました

  • Networks, we didn't have networks at all

    プロセッサの処理速度も同様です

  • at the time of the Macintosh's introduction,

    それにネットワーク

  • and that has become the single most salient aspect

    Macintoshが現れた頃 ネットワークはありませんでした

  • of how we live with computers.

    ネットワークは 今ではコンピュータにおける

  • And, of course, graphics: Today

    もっとも重要な要素となっています

  • 84 dollars and 97 cents at Best Buy

    それにもちろんグラフィックスも

  • buys you more graphics power

    今日 家電量販店で84.97ドルで買える

  • than you could have gotten for a million bucks from SGI only a decade ago.

    グラフィックス装置は

  • So we've got that incredible ramp-up.

    ほんの10年前 100万ドルしたSGIのものより 高性能なのです

  • Then, on the side, we've got the Web

    ものすごいパワーの上昇です

  • and, increasingly, the cloud,

    それに加え 私たちはWebを手に入れ

  • which is fantastic,

    クラウドを手にしつつあり

  • but also -- in the regard in which an interface is fundamental --

    素晴しいのですが

  • kind of a distraction.

    インタフェースの方は初歩的で

  • So we've forgotten to invent new interfaces.

    どちらかと言えば煩わしいままです

  • Certainly we've seen in recent years a lot of change in that regard,

    新しいインタフェースを作ることは 忘れられています

  • and people are starting to wake up about that.

    しかし最近は多くの変化を目にします

  • So what happens next? Where do we go from there?

    人々はこの点に関して目を覚ましつつあります

  • The problem, as we see it,

    では次に何が起きるのでしょう? どこへ向かうのでしょう?

  • has to do with a single, simple word: "space,"

    問題の鍵になるのは

  • or a single, simple phrase:

    単純な1つの言葉「空間」

  • "real world geometry."

    あるいは単純な1つのフレーズ

  • Computers and the programming languages

    「現実世界における幾何学」です

  • that we talk to them in, that we teach them in,

    コンピュータや コンピュータに指示する

  • are hideously insensate when it comes to space.

    プログラミング言語は

  • They don't understand real world space.

    空間について恐ろしく無頓着です

  • It's a funny thing because the rest of us occupy it quite frequently and quite well.

    現実の空間を理解しません

  • They also don't understand time, but that's a matter for a separate talk.

    私たち自身は非常にうまく空間を扱っているので これはおかしなことです

  • So what happens if you start to

    コンピュータはまた時間も理解しませんが これはまた別な話になります

  • explain space to them?

    ではコンピュータに空間を教えたら

  • One thing you might get is something like the Luminous Room.

    どうなるのでしょう?

  • The Luminous Room is a system

    答えの1つは「ルミナスルーム」のようなものになるでしょう

  • in which it's considered that

    ルミナスルームは

  • input and output spaces are co-located.

    入力と出力の空間が

  • That's a strangely simple,

    同じところに設定されたシステムです

  • and yet unexplored idea, right?

    奇妙なくらいにシンプルでありながら

  • When you use a mouse, your hand is down here on the mouse pad.

    いまだよく探求されてないアイデアです

  • It's not even on the same plane as what you're talking about:

    マウスを使うときは 手は下のほう マウスパッドの上にあり

  • The pixels are up on the display.

    扱う対象と同じ平面上にさえありません

  • So here was a room in which all the walls, floors, ceilings,

    ピクセルはディスプレイの上にあります

  • pets, potted plants, whatever was in there,

    これは壁や 床や ペットや 鉢植えといった

  • were capable, not only of display but of sensing as well.

    様々なものがある部屋で

  • And that means input and output are in the same space

    それぞれが表示するだけでなく 反応することもできます

  • enabling stuff like this.

    入力と出力が同じ空間にあって

  • That's a digital storage in a physical container.

    このようなことを可能にしています

  • The contract is the same

    物理的な入れ物にデジタル情報を保管します

  • as with real word objects in real world containers.

    ここでの決まり事は

  • Has to come back out, whatever you put in.

    現実の世界にある実際の容器と同じです

  • This little design experiment

    入れたものは何でも取り出せなければなりません

  • that was a small office here knew a few other tricks as well.

    この小さなデザインの実験作品には

  • If you presented it with a chess board,

    他にもいくつか仕掛けがあります

  • it tried to figure out what you might mean by that.

    チェス盤を載せると

  • And if there was nothing for them to do,

    それが何を意味するのか理解しようとします

  • the chess pieces eventually got bored

    そしてすることがなくなれば

  • and hopped away.

    チェスの駒たちは そのうち飽きて

  • The academics who were overseeing this work

    どっか行ってしまいます

  • thought that that was too frivolous,

    学者の目にはこの作品が

  • so we built deadly serious applications

    不真面目すぎると映るので

  • like this optics prototyping workbench

    「光学試作作業台」のような

  • in which a toothpaste cap on a cardboard box

    ごくまじめな応用例も用意しました

  • becomes a laser.

    厚紙の箱に付けた歯磨きチューブのキャップが

  • The beam splitters and lenses are represented by physical objects,

    レーザーを出します

  • and the system projects down the laser beam path.

    物理的なモノが ビームスプリッタやレンズを表し

  • So you've got an interface that has no interface.

    レーザービームの経路が表示されます

  • You operate the world as you operate the real world,

    いわばインタフェースのないインタフェースです

  • which is to say, with your hands.

    この世界では 現実世界と同じように

  • Similarly, a digital wind tunnel with digital wind

    自分の手で操作することができます

  • flowing from right to left --

    同様に この「デジタル風洞」では

  • not that remarkable in a sense; we didn't invent the mathematics.

    デジタルの風が右から左へと吹いています

  • But if you displayed that on a CRT or flat panel display,

    私たちが理論を発見したわけではないので そんな大した話ではありません

  • it would be meaningless to hold up an arbitrary object,

    でもCRTや液晶画面に表示していたら

  • a real world object in that.

    現実のモノをそこに置いたところで

  • Here, the real world merges with the simulation.

    何の意味もありません

  • And finally, to pull out all the stops,

    ここでは現実世界とシミュレーションとが 混じり合っています

  • this is a system called Urp, for urban planners,

    最後に あらゆるものを取り入れて

  • in which we give architects and urban planners back

    “Urp”という 都市計画者のためのシステムを作りました

  • the models that we confiscated

    CADを作った時に取り上げてしまった模型を

  • when we insisted that they use CAD systems.

    建築家や都市計画者の手に

  • And we make the machine meet them half way.

    取り戻そうというものです

  • It projects down digital shadows, as you see here.

    マシンが現実を半分だけ補っていて

  • And if you introduce tools like this inverse clock,

    ご覧のようにデジタルの影を表示します

  • then you can control the sun's position in the sky.

    そしてこのような「時計ツール」を持ってくると

  • That's 8 a.m. shadows.

    空にある太陽の位置をコントロールできます

  • They get a little shorter at 9 a.m.

    これは午前8時の影です

  • There you are, swinging the sun around.

    9時になると影が少し短くなります

  • Short shadows at noon and so forth.

    こうやって太陽を動かすことができます

  • And we built up a series of tools like this.

    正午には影はうんと短くなります

  • There are inter-shadowing studies

    この中には様々なツールを作り込みました

  • that children can operate,

    これを使うと 子どもでも

  • even though they don't know anything about urban planning:

    日陰の影響を検討できます

  • To move a building, you simply reach out your hand and you move the building.

    都市計画のことは何も知らなくても構いません

  • A material wand makes the building

    建物を動かすには ただ手を伸して動かしてやればいいのです

  • into a sort of Frank Gehry thing that reflects light in all directions.

    「素材スティック」を使うと

  • Are you blinding passers by and motorists on the freeways?

    フランク ゲーリーの作品みたいに 光りを反射するようになります

  • A zoning tool connects distant structures, a building and a roadway.

    建物が通行人や道路を走るドライバーの目を眩ませたりしないか?

  • Are you going to get sued by the zoning commission? And so forth.

    「区画ツール」は離れた建物や道を繋ぎます

  • Now, if these ideas seem familiar

    都市計画委員会に訴えられたりしないか?

  • or perhaps even a little dated,

    こんなアイデアは見慣れているとか

  • that's great; they should seem familiar.

    少し古いと感じられるなら

  • This work is 15 years old.

    それは結構なことです 見慣れていてしかるべきなのです

  • This stuff was undertaken at MIT and the Media Lab

    この作品は15年前に作られたのですから

  • under the incredible direction of Professor Hiroshi Ishii,

    これはMITメディアラボで

  • director of the Tangible Media Group.

    タンジブル メディア グループを率いる石井裕教授の

  • But it was that work that was seen

    素晴しい指揮の下に作られました

  • by Alex McDowell,

    そしてこれが世界的に有名な

  • one of the world's legendary production designers.

    プロダクションデザイナである

  • But Alex was preparing a little, sort of obscure, indie, arthouse film

    アレックス マクドウェルの目にとまったのです

  • called "Minority Report" for Steven Spielberg,

    アレックスは当時 漠然としたインディー的実験映画を準備していました

  • and invited us to come out from MIT

    スティーブン スピルバーグが監督する「マイノリティレポート」です

  • and design the interfaces

    そして私たちをMITから招いて

  • that would appear in that film.

    映画に出てくるインタフェースを

  • And the great thing about it was

    デザインさせたのです

  • that Alex was so dedicated to the idea of verisimilitude,

    素晴しいのは

  • the idea that the putative 2054

    迫真性にアレックスが真剣に取り組んでいたことで

  • that we were painting in the film be believable,

    映画に描かれる2054年の世界を

  • that he allowed us to take on that design work

    可能な限りリアルなものにするため

  • as if it were an R&D effort.

    デザイン作業を研究開発のように

  • And the result is sort of

    やらせてくれたのです

  • gratifyingly perpetual.

    結果はとても満足のいく

  • People still reference those sequences in "Minority Report"

    永続的価値を持つものになりました

  • when they talk about new UI design.

    人々はいまだに新しいUIデザインの話となると

  • So this led full circle, in a strange way,

    「マイノリティレポート」のシーンを引き合いに出しています

  • to build these ideas into what we believe

    そしてそれが奇妙な具合に一回りして

  • is the necessary future of human machine interface:

    私たちが マン マシン インタフェースの

  • the Spatial Operating Environment, we call it.

    必然的な未来であると考えている

  • So here we have a bunch of stuff, some images.

    「空間操作環境」のアイデアへと繋がりました

  • And, using a hand,

    ここには たくさんの画像があります

  • we can actually exercise six degrees of freedom,

    手を使って

  • six degrees of navigational control.

    6つの自由度のある

  • And it's fun to fly through Mr. Beckett's eye.

    ナビゲーション操作を行うことができます

  • And you can come back out

    ベケット氏の目の間を 自由に飛び抜け

  • through the scary orangutan.

    それから威嚇するオランウータンの間を

  • And that's all well and good.

    戻っていきます

  • Let's do something a little more difficult.

    とてもいい具合です

  • Here, we have a whole bunch of disparate images.

    もっと難しいことをやってみましょう

  • We can fly around them.

    様々な画像があります

  • So navigation is a fundamental issue.

    飛び回ることができます

  • You have to be able to navigate in 3D.

    ナビゲーションは基本的な問題です

  • Much of what we want computers to help us with in the first place

    3次元をナビゲートできる必要があります

  • is inherently spatial.

    私たちがコンピュータでやりたいと思うことの多くは そもそも

  • And the part that isn't spatial can often be spatialized

    本質的に空間的なものなのです

  • to allow our wetware to make greater sense of it.

    そして空間的でないものも 空間的にすることで

  • Now we can distribute this stuff in many different ways.

    私たちの頭にわかりやすくすることができます

  • So we can throw it out like that. Let's reset it.

    これをいろいろ違ったやり方で配置できます

  • We can organize it this way.

    この様に広げられます リセットして

  • And, of course, it's not just about navigation,

    こんな風に並べてみましょう

  • but about manipulation as well.

    もちろんナビゲーションだけでなく

  • So if we don't like stuff,

    操作もできます

  • or we're intensely curious about

    嫌いなものや

  • Ernst Haeckel's scientific falsifications,

    特に興味深いものがあれば…

  • we can pull them out like that.

    エルンスト ヘッケルの科学的に歪曲された絵を

  • And then if it's time for analysis, we can pull back a little bit

    このように取りのけておくこともできます

  • and ask for a different distribution.

    分析するときには 少し後ろに引いて

  • Let's just come down a bit

    配置を変えます

  • and fly around.

    もう少し下に移動して

  • So that's a different way to look at stuff.

    眺めてみましょう

  • If you're of a more analytical nature

    これもまた1つの見方です

  • then you might want, actually, to look at this

    分析的な人は これを

  • as a color histogram.

    色のヒストグラムとして

  • So now we've got the stuff color-sorted,

    見てみたいと思うかもしれません

  • angle maps onto color.

    色に従って並べてみました

  • And now, if we want to select stuff,

    色と角度が対応づけられています

  • 3D, space,

    この3次元空間で

  • the idea that we're tracking hands in real space

    選択をしようと思ったら

  • becomes really important because we can reach in,

    現実の空間の中で手をトラッキングすることが重要になります

  • not in 2D, not in fake 2D, but in actual 3D.

    私たちが触れるのは 2次元ではなく 擬似的3次元でもなく

  • Here are some selection planes.

    本当の3次元だからです

  • And we'll perform this Boolean operation

    この選択平面を使って

  • because we really love yellow and tapirs on green grass.

    論理演算をし

  • So, from there to the world of real work.

    大好きな黄色と 緑の草の上のバクを取り出しました

  • Here's a logistics system,

    次に 実際の仕事の世界を見てみましょう

  • a small piece of one that we're currently building.

    これは私たちが現在構築している

  • There're a lot of elements.

    ロジスティックスシステムの一部です

  • And one thing that's very important is to combine traditional tabular data

    たくさんの要素があります

  • with three-dimensional and geospatial information.

    ここで重要なのは 従来的な表形式データと

  • So here's a familiar place.

    3次元的な地理空間情報を結びつけることです

  • And we'll bring this back here for a second.

    おなじみの場所ですね

  • Maybe select a little bit of that.

    表をいったん持ってきて

  • And bring out this graph.

    一部を選択し

  • And we should, now,

    グラフにして

  • be able to fly in here

    今度は

  • and have a closer look.

    こっちに移って

  • These are logistics elements

    近寄って…

  • that are scattered across the United States.

    これにはアメリカ中に散らばっている

  • One thing that three-dimensional interactions

    ロジスティックス要素が表示されています

  • and the general idea of imbuing

    3次元的インタラクションと

  • computation with space affords you

    空間を取り入れた計算

  • is a final destruction of that unfortunate

    という考えによって

  • one-to-one pairing between human beings and computers.

    人とコンピュータの間の

  • That's the old way, that's the old mantra:

    嘆かわしい1対1の関係を打ち壊すことができるでしょう

  • one machine, one human, one mouse, one screen.

    古いやり方 古いしきたりでは

  • Well, that doesn't really cut it anymore.

    1台のマシンに 1人の人 1つのマウス 1つの画面です

  • In the real world, we have people who collaborate;

    そんなのは もはや立ちゆきません

  • we have people who have to work together,

    現実世界では 作業は協同して行われます

  • and we have many different displays.

    一緒に作業する相手がいて

  • And we might want to look at these various images.

    たくさんの画面があります

  • We might want to ask for some help.

    見たい画像がたくさんあります

  • The author of this new pointing device

    誰か手伝ってほしいと思うかもしれません

  • is sitting over there,

    この新しいポインティングデバイスの作者が

  • so I can pull this from there to there.

    向こうに座っています

  • These are unrelated machines, right?

    画像をこちらから向こうに移動することができます

  • So the computation is space soluble and network soluble.

    別なマシンの間でです

  • So I'm going to leave that over there

    計算が空間やネットワークを越え 溶け込んでいます

  • because I have a question for Paul.

    ポールに聞きたいことがあるので

  • Paul is the designer of this wand, and maybe its easiest

    あれは向こうに置いておきましょう

  • for him to come over here and tell me in person what's going on.

    ポールはこのスティックのデザイナなので

  • So let me get some of these out of the way.

    彼に出てきて説明してもらった方が早いかもしれません

  • Let's pull this apart:

    ここをちょっと片付けて

  • I'll go ahead and explode it.

    これを分解し

  • Kevin, can you help?

    さらにバラバラにします

  • Let me see if I can help us find the circuit board.

    ケビン 手伝ってくれるかな?

  • Mind you, it's a sort of gratuitous field-stripping exercise,

    回路基板を見つけられるかやってみましょう

  • but we do it in the lab all the time.

    銃の分解組み立ての練習みたいなものです

  • All right.

    ラボでしょっちゅうやっています

  • So collaborative work, whether it's immediately co-located

    いいでしょう

  • or distant and distinct, is always important.

    協同作業というのは 同じ場所にいようと

  • And again, that stuff

    遠隔地にいようと 常に重要なものです