Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • This is a picture of Maurice Druon,

    翻訳: Keisuke Kusunoki 校正: Kazuyuki Shimatani

  • the Honorary Perpetual Secretary of L'Academie francaise,

    彼はモーリス・ドルオン

  • the French Academy.

    アカデミー・フランセーズ つまりフランス語審議会の

  • He is splendidly attired in his 68,000-dollar uniform,

    永久名誉会員です

  • befitting the role of the French Academy

    彼は6万8千ドルの制服を立派に着こなし

  • as legislating the

    アカデミー・フランセーズ会員の

  • correct usage in French

    フランス語の正しい用法と

  • and perpetuating the language.

    正しい発音を制定する

  • The French Academy has two main tasks:

    という役割に実にふさわしいです

  • it compiles a dictionary of official French.

    アカデミー・フランセーズには大きく2つの任務があります

  • They're now working on their ninth edition,

    1つは公式のフランス語の辞書を編纂すること

  • which they began in 1930, and they've reached the letter P.

    現在 彼らは 1930年から開始された 第9版に取り掛かっていて

  • They also legislate on correct usage,

    今 「P」の文字まで進んだところです

  • such as the proper term for what the French call "email,"

    正しい用法の制定も行っていて

  • which ought to be "courriel."

    フランス人が「eメール」と呼ぶものの適切な用語として

  • The World Wide Web, the French are told,

    "courriel"が使用されるべきだと主張しています

  • ought to be referred to as

    フランス人が「ワールドワイドウェブ」と呼ぶものは

  • "la toile d'araignee mondiale" -- the Global Spider Web --

    "la toile d'araignee mondiale" -- 地球規模の蜘蛛の巣 -- と

  • recommendations that the French gaily ignore.

    呼ぶように取り決められました

  • Now, this is one model of how language comes to be:

    しかし 結局はフランス人が気にもかけない約束事です

  • namely, it's legislated by an academy.

    この話は 言語がどう扱われていたかを示す1つの例です

  • But anyone who looks at language realizes

    言語は特定の審議会によって正しい用法を制定されてきました

  • that this is a rather silly conceit,

    しかし 言語を見てみたら誰でも

  • that language, rather, emerges from human minds interacting from one another.

    そんなことは間抜けな発想だとわかります

  • And this is visible in the unstoppable change in language --

    言語はむしろ 人と人の相互関係から現れるものです

  • the fact that by the time the Academy finishes their dictionary,

    言語が絶え間なく変わっていくことを考えれば これは明らかです

  • it will already be well out of date.

    実際 アカデミー・フランセーズが辞書を編纂し終える頃には

  • We see it in the

    それは もうすでに時代遅れになっているでしょう

  • constant appearance of slang and jargon,

    このことは

  • of the historical change in languages,

    俗語と隠語の絶え間ない出現

  • in divergence of dialects

    言語の歴史的な変化

  • and the formation of new languages.

    方言の多様性

  • So language is not so much a creator or shaper of human nature,

    新しい言語の形成 などからわかります

  • so much as a window onto human nature.

    つまり言語は人間の性質を作ったり形成したりすものではなく

  • In a book that I'm currently working on,

    人間の性質を見るための窓なのです

  • I hope to use language to shed light on

    いま書いている本で

  • a number of aspects of human nature,

    私は言語を通して

  • including the cognitive machinery

    世界の概念体系を形成する認知機構と

  • with which humans conceptualize the world

    人間の相互作用を左右する関係などの

  • and the relationship types that govern human interaction.

    人間の本質のいくつかの側面を

  • And I'm going to say a few words about each one this morning.

    明らかにさせています

  • Let me start off with a technical problem in language

    この場ではそれぞれについてお話しします

  • that I've worried about for quite some time --

    時々 問題になる

  • and indulge me

    言語の形式的な問題から始めましょう --

  • in my passion for verbs and how they're used.

    動詞と動詞の使用法に対する

  • The problem is, which verbs go in which constructions?

    私の愛着に しばらくお付き合いください

  • The verb is the chassis of the sentence.

    どの動詞がどの構文にフィットするのか?

  • It's the framework onto which the other parts are bolted.

    動詞は いわば 文の車台です

  • Let me give you a quick reminder

    動詞が骨組みとなり その上に他の部品がボルトで留められます

  • of something that you've long forgotten.

    誰もが習ったことを

  • An intransitive verb, such as "dine," for example,

    少し思い出しましょう

  • can't take a direct object.

    "dine(食事をする)"などの自動詞は

  • You have to say, "Sam dined," not, "Sam dined the pizza."

    直接目的語をとることができません

  • A transitive verb mandates

    "Sam dined(サムは食事をとった)”は正しいが "Sam dined the pizza"は間違いです

  • that there has to be an object there:

    他動詞には

  • "Sam devoured the pizza." You can't just say, "Sam devoured."

    目的語をつけなければならない

  • There are dozens or scores of verbs of this type,

    "Sam devoured the pizza(サムはピザをガツガツ食べた)"は良いが "Sam devoured"とは言えない

  • each of which shapes its sentence.

    この種の動詞は数十種類あり

  • So, a problem in explaining how children learn language,

    文の形式を決めています

  • a problem in teaching language to adults so that they don't make grammatical errors,

    子どもの言語獲得の方略を説明したり

  • and a problem in programming computers to use language is

    文法的に間違えないように 大人に外国語を教えたり

  • which verbs go in which constructions.

    あるいはコンピュータが言語を操れるようにプログラムする時

  • For example, the dative construction in English.

    どの動詞がどの構文で使えるのか が問題になります

  • You can say, "Give a muffin to a mouse," the prepositional dative.

    例えば 英語の与格構文では

  • Or, "Give a mouse a muffin," the double-object dative.

    前置詞付き与格の"Give a muffin to a mouse(マフィンをネズミに与える)"も

  • "Promise anything to her," "Promise her anything," and so on.

    2重目的語の"Give mouse a muffin"のどちらでも言えて

  • Hundreds of verbs can go both ways.

    "Promise anything to her(何でも彼女に約束する)""Promise her anything"などと例は多くあります

  • So a tempting generalization for a child,

    何百もの動詞が 両方の構文で使用できます

  • for an adult, for a computer

    全ての動詞において

  • is that any verb that can appear in the construction,

    「主語-動詞-モノ-to-受け手」が

  • "subject-verb-thing-to-a-recipient"

    「主語-動詞-受け手-モノ」と言い換えられるのだと

  • can also be expressed as "subject-verb-recipient-thing."

    子供も 大人も コンピュータも

  • A handy thing to have,

    一般化してしまおうと考えてしまうのです

  • because language is infinite,

    言語は無限にあり

  • and you can't just parrot back the sentences that you've heard.

    聞いた分をオウム返しすることはできないから

  • You've got to extract generalizations

    これは便利なことです

  • so you can produce and understand new sentences.

    新しい文を作ったり理解したりするために

  • This would be an example of how to do that.

    一般的ルールを抽出しなければならない

  • Unfortunately, there appear to be idiosyncratic exceptions.

    これはその方法の一例です

  • You can say, "Biff drove the car to Chicago,"

    しかし残念ながら 特異な例外が存在します

  • but not, "Biff drove Chicago the car."

    "Biff drove the car to Chicago(ビフはシカゴまで車を運転した)"とは言えるが

  • You can say, "Sal gave Jason a headache,"

    "Biff drove Chicago the car"とは言えません

  • but it's a bit odd to say, "Sal gave a headache to Jason."

    "Sal gave Jason a headache(サルはジェイソンの頭を悩ませた)"とは言えるが

  • The solution is that these constructions, despite initial appearance,

    "Sal gave a headache to Jason"では少しおかしくなってしまう

  • are not synonymous,

    この問題を解決する鍵は これらの構文は

  • that when you crank up the microscope

    文の最初は同じでも 同義ではないことにあります

  • on human cognition, you see that there's a subtle difference

    顕微鏡で人間の認知機能を見たら

  • in meaning between them.

    2つの構文の間に

  • So, "give the X to the Y,"

    微妙な違いがあることがわかるでしょう

  • that construction corresponds to the thought

    "Give the X to the Y(XをYに与える)"の構文は

  • "cause X to go to Y." Whereas "give the Y the X"

    "Cause X to go to Y(XをYに行かせる)"という思考と一致していて

  • corresponds to the thought "cause Y to have X."

    "Give the Y the X(YにXを与える)"は

  • Now, many events can be subject to either construal,

    "Cause Y to have X(YがXを持つようにさせる)"という思考と一致します

  • kind of like the classic figure-ground reversal illusions,

    多くの事象についてはどちらの解釈も可能で

  • in which you can either pay attention

    それは 古典的な地と図の反転の錯視のようなものです

  • to the particular object,

    中央の物体に

  • in which case the space around it recedes from attention,

    注意を向けると

  • or you can see the faces in the empty space,

    周りの空間の絵柄への注意は弱くなり

  • in which case the object recedes out of consciousness.

    空白のスペースの顔に注視すると

  • How are these construals reflected in language?

    中央の物体は意識の外に追いやられます

  • Well, in both cases, the thing that is construed as being affected

    これらの解釈がどのように言語に反映されているのでしょうか?

  • is expressed as the direct object,

    どちらの場合でも 影響が与えられたと解釈されるモノは

  • the noun after the verb.

    動詞の後に名詞が来る

  • So, when you think of the event as causing the muffin to go somewhere --

    直接目的語で表現されます

  • where you're doing something to the muffin --

    マフィンをどこかに移動させる事象 --

  • you say, "Give the muffin to the mouse."

    つまりマフィンに対して何かをしている時 -- の場合は

  • When you construe it as "cause the mouse to have something,"

    "Give the muffin to the mouse"と言います

  • you're doing something to the mouse,

    「ネズミが何かを持たせる」 つまり ネズミに対して何かをしていると

  • and therefore you express it as, "Give the mouse the muffin."

    解釈する場合には

  • So which verbs go in which construction --

    "Give the mouse the muffin"と表現します

  • the problem with which I began --

    つまり私が提起した問題である

  • depends on whether the verb specifies a kind of motion

    どの動詞がどの構文に使用できるのか は

  • or a kind of possession change.

    動詞が 動作を指示しているのか 所有の変化を指示しているのか

  • To give something involves both causing something to go

    によって決まるということです

  • and causing someone to have.

    何かを与えることは何かを移動させることと

  • To drive the car only causes something to go,

    誰かに所有させることの両方を含有しています

  • because Chicago's not the kind of thing that can possess something.

    車を運転することは 移動だけしか表していません

  • Only humans can possess things.

    シカゴが何かを所有することは不可能だからです

  • And to give someone a headache causes them to have the headache,

    人間だけがモノを所有できます

  • but it's not as if you're taking the headache out of your head

    誰かに頭痛を与えることは 頭痛を「所有」させることですが

  • and causing it to go to the other person,

    それは 頭痛を頭から取り出して

  • and implanting it in them.

    意図的に他人に移動させて

  • You may just be loud or obnoxious,

    頭の中に入れることとは捉えられません

  • or some other way causing them to have the headache.

    頭痛が引き起こされるのは

  • So, that's

    他人の騒音や不愉快な態度に悩まされた時です

  • an example of the kind of thing that I do in my day job.

    これが 私がやっている仕事の

  • So why should anyone care?

    1つの例です

  • Well, there are a number of interesting conclusions, I think,

    なぜ こんなことを考える必要があるのでしょうか

  • from this and many similar kinds of analyses

    興味深い結論付けが

  • of hundreds of English verbs.

    これと似たような 数百もの英語の動詞の

  • First, there's a level of fine-grained conceptual structure,

    分析を元に なされています

  • which we automatically and unconsciously compute

    まず 文を作ったり発音したりする時に 自動的に無意識的に処理される

  • every time we produce or utter a sentence, that governs our use of language.

    きめ細やかな概念構造のレベルがあり

  • You can think of this as the language of thought, or "mentalese."

    それが人の言語使用を支配しています

  • It seems to be based on a fixed set of concepts,

    これは思考の言語 または "Mentalese" と呼ばれるものです

  • which govern dozens of constructions and thousands of verbs --

    この"Mentalese"は ある決まった概念のセットに基づいており

  • not only in English, but in all other languages --

    そのセットが何十もの構文 何千もの動詞を体系化しているようです

  • fundamental concepts such as space,

    英語に限らず 他の全ての言語でも同じです

  • time, causation and human intention,

    ここでの根本的な概念とは 空間 時間 因果関係

  • such as, what is the means and what is the ends?

    意図 -- 何が手段で 何が目標か

  • These are reminiscent of the kinds of categories

    といったものが該当します

  • that Immanuel Kant argued

    このことは イマニュエル・カントが主張した

  • are the basic framework for human thought,

    人間の思考の基本的な枠組みにおける分類を

  • and it's interesting that our unconscious use of language

    思い起こさせます

  • seems to reflect these Kantian categories.

    面白いことに 無意識での言語使用は

  • Doesn't care about perceptual qualities,

    色 手ざわり 重量 速度 などの

  • such as color, texture, weight and speed,

    知覚的性質には関係ない とする

  • which virtually never differentiate

    カントの分類を反映しているようです

  • the use of verbs in different constructions.

    実際 これらの知覚的性質は

  • An additional twist is that all of the constructions in English

    異なった構文での動詞の用法に影響を与えません

  • are used not only literally,

    もう1つの傾向として

  • but in a quasi-metaphorical way.

    全ての英語の構文は 字義的な意味だけではなく

  • For example, this construction, the dative,

    比喩的な意味にも使われる ということがあります

  • is used not only to transfer things,

    例えば この与格の構文は

  • but also for the metaphorical transfer of ideas,

    物体を移動させることだけではなく

  • as when we say, "She told a story to me"

    思考を移動させることのメタファーとしても使用されています

  • or "told me a story,"

    "She told a story to me(彼女は物語を私に話した)"

  • "Max taught Spanish to the students" or "taught the students Spanish."

    または "told me a story"

  • It's exactly the same construction,

    "Max taught Spanish to the students(マックスはスペイン語を生徒に教えた)" または "taught the students Spanish"などが例です

  • but no muffins, no mice, nothing moving at all.

    これらは さきほどと全く同じ構文ですが

  • It evokes the container metaphor of communication,

    マフィンもネズミもでてきません 何も移動していないのです

  • in which we conceive of ideas as objects,

    このことは 思考として

  • sentences as containers,

    文を容器として

  • and communication as a kind of sending.

    コミュニケーションを送信の一種として捉える

  • As when we say we "gather" our ideas, to "put" them "into" words,

    「格納メタファー」を想像させます

  • and if our words aren't "empty" or "hollow,"

    例えば アイディアを「集め」 それを言葉に「出す」

  • we might get these ideas "across" to a listener,

    その言葉が 「空っぽ」であったり「中が空洞」でないならば

  • who can "unpack" our words to "extract" their "content."

    アイディアは聞き手にまで「渡り」

  • And indeed, this kind of verbiage is not the exception, but the rule.

    聞き手は言葉を「ひも解いて」 「中身」を「引き出す」 という表現を用います。

  • It's very hard to find any example of abstract language

    この種の用法は特別なものではなく、習慣的に使用されています

  • that is not based on some concrete metaphor.

    抽象言語において

  • For example, you can use the verb "go"

    具体物のメタファーを利用しない例を見つけることは容易ではありません

  • and the prepositions "to" and "from"

    例えば 動詞の"go"は

  • in a literal, spatial sense.

    "to"と"from"という前置詞と共に使えます

  • "The messenger went from Paris to Istanbul."

    文字通り空間的な意味の文としては

  • You can also say, "Biff went from sick to well."

    "The messenger went from Paris to Istanbul(配達人はパリからイスタンブールへ行った)"

  • He needn't go anywhere. He could have been in bed the whole time,

    しかし"Biff went from sick to well(ビフは病気から健康になった)"とも言えます

  • but it's as if his health is a point in state space

    ビフがどこかに行く必要はない ずっとベッドで寝ていたに違いないので

  • that you conceptualize as moving.

    だがこの表現は 彼の健康は状態を表す空間にある点であり

  • Or, "The meeting went from three to four,"

    その点が移動しているととらえているのです

  • in which we conceive of time as stretched along a line.

    "The meeting went from three to four(会議は3時から4時まで行われた)"では

  • Likewise, we use "force" to indicate

    時間を一つの線上に伸びているものと考えています

  • not only physical force,

    同様に force(~を行わせる)を使用するときでも

  • as in, "Rose forced the door to open,"

    "Rose forced the door to open(ローズはドアをこじ開けた)" のような

  • but also interpersonal force,

    物理的な力だけではなく

  • as in, "Rose forced Sadie to go," not necessarily by manhandling her,

    "Rose forced Sadie to go(ローズはサディーに行くことを強要した)" のように

  • but by issuing a threat.

    対人的な力も表現できる これは必ずしも腕で人を動かす必要はなく

  • Or, "Rose forced herself to go,"

    脅しをすることで人を動かしています

  • as if there were two entities inside Rose's head,

    あるいは"Rose forced herself to go(ローズは自分自身をそこへ向かわせるようにした)"

  • engaged in a tug of a war.

    まるでローズの頭の中に2つの存在がいて

  • Second conclusion is that the ability to conceive

    綱引きをしているかのようです

  • of a given event in two different ways,

    2つ目の結論は

  • such as "cause something to go to someone"

    「<もの>が<人>に渡るようにさせる」と

  • and "causing someone to have something,"

    「<人>に<もの>を持たせる」 のように

  • I think is a fundamental feature of human thought,

    起こった出来事を2通りの方法で解釈できる能力は

  • and it's the basis for much human argumentation,

    人間の思考の根本的な特徴であり

  • in which people don't differ so much on the facts

    人が議論を行う上での基礎をなしています

  • as on how they ought to be construed.

    事実に対して大きな違いを認めない場合でも

  • Just to give you a few examples:

    人によって そのとらえ方が異なってしまうのです

  • "ending a pregnancy" versus "killing a fetus;"

    いくつか例を挙げましょう

  • "a ball of cells" versus "an unborn child;"

    「妊娠を終わらせる」と「胎児を殺す」

  • "invading Iraq" versus "liberating Iraq;"

    「細胞のかたまり」と「生まれる前の子ども」

  • "redistributing wealth" versus "confiscating earnings."

    「イラクを侵攻する」と「イラクを解放する」

  • And I think the biggest picture of all

    「富の再分配」と「所得の没収」

  • would take seriously the fact

    これら全てを総括すると

  • that so much of our verbiage about abstract events

    抽象的出来事に対する用法の大半は

  • is based on a concrete metaphor

    具体物のメタファーに依拠していることが

  • and see human intelligence itself

    事実であると示唆しています

  • as consisting of a repertoire of concepts --

    これによると 人間の知性を構成するものの1つ目は

  • such as objects, space, time, causation and intention --

    物体 空間 時間 因果 意図 などの

  • which are useful in a social, knowledge-intensive species,

    概念の積み重ねです

  • whose evolution you can well imagine,

    これは社会的で知識集約型の種には有利なのです

  • and a process of metaphorical abstraction

    その種がどのように進化するかは想像できるでしょう

  • that allows us to bleach these concepts

    人間の知性を構成するもう1つの要素は

  • of their original conceptual content --

    メタファーによる概念の抽出です

  • space, time and force --

    これにより 抽象的な概念から 空間 時間 力といった

  • and apply them to new abstract domains,

    元の概念を浮き上がらせることができるのです

  • therefore allowing a species that evolved

    それらを新しい抽象的物事に適用することで

  • to deal with rocks and tools and animals,

    人間は岩や道具や動物を扱う段階から

  • to conceptualize mathematics, physics, law

    数学や物理学や法律や

  • and other abstract domains.

    あるいやその他の抽象的なものを

  • Well, I said I'd talk about two windows on human nature --

    具体化できるように進化したのです

  • the cognitive machinery with which we conceptualize the world,

    さて 人間の性質の2つの窓について話すと申し上げました

  • and now I'm going to say a few words about the relationship types

    世界を概念化するための認知的機構について に続き

  • that govern human social interaction,

    言語という観点から

  • again, as reflected in language.

    関係性の形式が

  • And I'll start out with a puzzle, the puzzle of indirect speech acts.

    言語にどう反映されているのかお話します

  • Now, I'm sure most of you have seen the movie "Fargo."

    まず 間接的な会話の問題から始めましょう

  • And you might remember the scene in which

    かなりの方が 映画の『ファーゴ』をご覧になっているでしょう

  • the kidnapper is pulled over by a police officer,

    こういう場面がありましたね

  • is asked to show his driver's license

    誘拐犯が 警官によって車を停止させられ

  • and holds his wallet out

    免許証を見せるように言われます

  • with a 50-dollar bill extending

    誘拐犯は 50ドル札を

  • at a slight angle out of the wallet.

    わずかに 見えるようにしながら

  • And he says, "I was just thinking

    財布を広げ こう言います

  • that maybe we could take care of it here in Fargo,"

    「ここファーゴでは そういうこともありかと

  • which everyone, including the audience,

    思っていたんだがなあ」

  • interprets as a veiled bribe.

    これは 観客も含め

  • This kind of indirect speech is rampant in language.

    賄賂の遠回しな申し出だと解釈します

  • For example, in polite requests,

    このような間接的な会話は 言語のいたるところに存在します

  • if someone says, "If you could pass the guacamole,

    例えば 丁寧なお願いをする場合

  • that would be awesome,"

    「グアカモーレを取ってくれたら

  • we know exactly what he means,

    すごくいいんですが」と誰かが言ったら

  • even though that's a rather bizarre

    何を意図しているのか

  • concept being expressed.

    明確に分かります