Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • My title: "Queerer than we can suppose: the strangeness of science."

    翻訳: Ryoichi KATO 校正: Satoshi Tatsuhara

  • "Queerer than we can suppose" comes from J.B.S. Haldane, the famous biologist,

    この講演に「想像できないほど奇妙な科学の不思議さ」と名付けました

  • who said, "Now, my own suspicion is that the universe is not only queerer

    「想像できないほど奇妙な」という一節は

  • than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.

    有名な生物学者J.B.S.ホールデンのものです。

  • I suspect that there are more things in heaven and earth

    「宇宙は我々が想像しているよりも奇妙なのはもちろんのこと、...

  • than are dreamed of, or can be dreamed of, in any philosophy."

    ...我々の想像する能力を越えて奇妙なのではないだろうか」

  • Richard Feynman compared the accuracy of quantum theories --

    「おそらく、どんな哲学が夢見た、そして夢見れるものよりも

  • experimental predictions --

    奇妙なものが天や地にはあるだろう」とホールデンは言っています

  • to specifying the width of North America to within one hair's breadth of accuracy.

    物理学者リチャード=ファインマンは、量子論により実測結果を予測することを

  • This means that quantum theory has got to be, in some sense, true.

    「北アメリカ大陸の幅を

  • Yet the assumptions that quantum theory needs to make

    髪の毛一本分の誤差範囲内で特定するぐらい正確だ」と例えています

  • in order to deliver those predictions are so mysterious

    このことから、量子論はある意味で真実だと言えるでしょう

  • that even Feynman himself was moved to remark,

    しかし、この正確な予測のために必要な仮定は

  • "If you think you understand quantum theory,

    とても不可解なものなのです

  • you don't understand quantum theory."

    ファインマン彼自身このように言っています

  • It's so queer that physicists resort to one or another

    「もしも量子力学を理解できたと思ったならば...

  • paradoxical interpretation of it.

    ...それは量子力学を理解できていない証拠だ」

  • David Deutsch, who's talking here, in "The Fabric of Reality,"

    あまりにも奇妙なので、物理学者は

  • embraces the many-worlds interpretation of quantum theory,

    いろいろな逆説的な解釈をしなければならないほどです

  • because the worst that you can say about it

    この場で講演することになっているデイヴィッド=ドイッチェは

  • is that it's preposterously wasteful.

    著書「世界の究極理論は存在するか」で量子力学の「多世界解釈」を容認しています

  • It postulates a vast and rapidly growing number of universes existing in parallel,

    なぜなら「多世界解釈」について言えるのは、悪くても

  • mutually undetectable,

    途方もなく無駄が多いことだけだからです

  • except through the narrow porthole of quantum mechanical experiments.

    この解釈では、無数の、そして急速に増加する宇宙が

  • And that's Richard Feynman.

    並行して存在すると主張します

  • The biologist Lewis Wolpert believes

    しかしそれらは量子力学の実験を通した小さな覗き窓からしか互いの存在を検知できません

  • that the queerness of modern physics

    ファインマンの話は以上です

  • is just an extreme example.

    生物学者 ルイス=ウォルパートは

  • Science, as opposed to technology,

    現代物理学の奇妙な点は

  • does violence to common sense.

    極端な例の一端に過ぎないと信じています

  • Every time you drink a glass of water, he points out,

    科学はテクノロジーと違い常識を裏切ります

  • the odds are that you will imbibe at least one molecule

    彼が指摘するには、あなたがコップ一杯の水を飲むごとに

  • that passed through the bladder of Oliver Cromwell.

    オリバー=クロムウェルの膀胱を通過した分子を

  • (Laughter)

    少なくともひとつは吸収するだろうというのです

  • It's just elementary probability theory.

    これは初歩の確率の問題に過ぎません

  • (Laughter)

    一杯のコップに含まれるの水の分子の数は

  • The number of molecules per glassful is hugely greater

    世界中にあるコップや膀胱の数よりも遥かに多いのです

  • than the number of glassfuls, or bladdersful, in the world.

    もちろん、クロムウェルや膀胱が特別なのではありません

  • And of course, there's nothing special about Cromwell or bladders --

    あなたが今まさに呼吸したのは

  • you have just breathed in a nitrogen atom

    背の高いソテツの木の左側の3番目のイグアナドンの

  • that passed through the right lung of the third iguanodon

    右の肺を通過した窒素原子です

  • to the left of the tall cycad tree.

    「想像できないほど奇妙な」

  • "Queerer than we can suppose."

    我々は、どうして想像することができるのでしょうか

  • What is it that makes us capable of supposing anything,

    どんなことまでを想像できるのでしょうか

  • and does this tell us anything about what we can suppose?

    この宇宙には、我々より高度な知能には理解できるけれども

  • Are there things about the universe that will be forever beyond our grasp,

    我々の理解を越えるようなことがあるでしょうか?

  • but not beyond the grasp of some superior intelligence?

    それとも我々の理解を越えるだけでなく

  • Are there things about the universe

    どんなに高等な知能であっても理解できないようなことが

  • that are, in principle, ungraspable by any mind,

    存在するのでしょうか

  • however superior?

    科学の歴史は突拍子もない考えの連続です

  • The history of science has been one long series of violent brainstorms,

    それぞれの次の世代では

  • as successive generations have come to terms with

    より奇妙さを増してゆく宇宙と

  • increasing levels of queerness in the universe.

    折り合いを付けなければなりません

  • We're now so used to the idea that the Earth spins,

    現代の我々は、太陽が地球を回るのではなく

  • rather than the Sun moves across the sky,

    地球が自転するという考えに慣れてます

  • it's hard for us to realize

    それがどんな精神的な大革命だったか想像が難しいですが

  • what a shattering mental revolution that must have been.

    大地が広大で静止しており太陽は小さくて動きまわるというのが

  • After all, it seems obvious that the Earth is large and motionless,

    とても明白に思えます しかしこの主題に対するウィトゲンシュタインの見解を

  • the Sun, small and mobile.

    思い起こすとよいでしょう

  • But it's worth recalling Wittgenstein's remark on the subject:

    「なぜ、地球が自転するより

  • "Tell me," he asked a friend, "why do people always say

    ...太陽が地球を回る方が自然だと

  • it was natural for man to assume that the Sun went 'round the Earth,

    ...みんな言うのだろう」と彼が尋ねると

  • rather than that the Earth was rotating?"

    友人はこう答えました

  • And his friend replied, "Well, obviously,

    「そりゃもちろん太陽の方が回っているように見えるからさ」

  • because it just looks as though the Sun is going round the Earth."

    「ではもし地球が自転しているとしたら

  • Wittgenstein replied, "Well, what would it have looked like

    ...どう見えただろうね」とウィトゲンシュタインは切り返しました

  • if it had looked as though the Earth was rotating?"

    岩やクリスタルのように明らかに固いものが

  • (Laughter)

    直感を裏切ってほとんど空っぽの空間から出来ていると

  • Science has taught us, against all intuition,

    科学は我々に教えてくれました

  • that apparently solid things, like crystals and rocks,

    原子核は野球場の中央にいるハエだという説明があります

  • are really almost entirely composed of empty space.

    その隣りにある原子は

  • And the familiar illustration is the nucleus of an atom

    隣りの野球場に相当します

  • is a fly in the middle of a sports stadium,

    ですから、どんなに固く頑丈な岩であっても

  • and the next atom is in the next sports stadium.

    ほとんどが空っぽの空間からできていて

  • So it would seem the hardest, solidest, densest rock

    粒子はとてもまばらにしか存在しません

  • is really almost entirely empty space,

    ではなぜ、岩は固いように感じられるのでしょうか

  • broken only by tiny particles so widely spaced they shouldn't count.

    進化生物学者として、私の説明はこうです

  • Why, then, do rocks look and feel solid and hard and impenetrable?

    我々の脳は、体が活動するサイズと速度にあわせて生存できるように進化してきました

  • As an evolutionary biologist, I'd say this: our brains have evolved

    原子の世界で生きるようには

  • to help us survive within the orders of magnitude, of size and speed

    進化しなかったのです

  • which our bodies operate at.

    もししていたら、我々の脳は岩をほとんどからっぽの空間と認識したでしょう

  • We never evolved to navigate in the world of atoms.

    岩が固く、手では貫けないように感じるのは

  • If we had, our brains probably would perceive rocks

    まさに岩石や手のような物体は

  • as full of empty space.

    互いに貫くことがないからです

  • Rocks feel hard and impenetrable

    ですから、我々がいる中くらいのサイズの世界を生きてゆく上で

  • to our hands, precisely because objects like rocks and hands

    我々の脳が「固い」とか「貫けない」といった概念を生み出すのは

  • cannot penetrate each other.

    便利なことなのです

  • It's therefore useful

    反対に大きなスケールのことを考えると、我々の祖先は

  • for our brains to construct notions like "solidity" and "impenetrability,"

    宇宙空間を光速に近い速度で移動する必要はありませんでした

  • because such notions help us to navigate our bodies

    もし必要だったら、アインシュタインを理解するのも簡単だったでしょう

  • through the middle-sized world in which we have to navigate.

    我々が活動し進化してきたこの中くらいの大きさの世界を

  • Moving to the other end of the scale,

    「 中ほどの国」と名付けたいと思います。

  • our ancestors never had to navigate through the cosmos

    指輪物語の「中つ国」とは...

  • at speeds close to the speed of light.

    ...関係ありません。「中ほどの国」です

  • If they had, our brains would be much better at understanding Einstein.

    我々はこの「中ほどの国」で進化してきました

  • I want to give the name "Middle World" to the medium-scaled environment

    そしてそのことが我々の想像力を制約します

  • in which we've evolved the ability to take act --

    兎が「中ほどの国」の物体が動くような「中ほど」の速度で動いていて

  • nothing to do with "Middle Earth" --

    別の「中ほどの国」の物体である岩がぶつかったら

  • Middle World.

    失神する、と直感で簡単に想像できます

  • (Laughter)

    アルバート=スタブルバイン三世のことを紹介しましょう

  • We are evolved denizens of Middle World,

    彼は1983年に陸軍情報部少将でした

  • and that limits what we are capable of imagining.

    彼はヴァージニア州アーリントンでオフィスの壁を睨んで決断しました

  • We find it intuitively easy to grasp ideas like,

    なんと、彼は隣りのオフィスへ行くというのです

  • when a rabbit moves at the sort of medium velocity

    彼は立ち上がって机を背にします

  • at which rabbits and other Middle World objects move,

    彼は考えました「原子はほとんどが空っぽの空間でできている」

  • and hits another Middle World object like a rock, it knocks itself out.

    彼は歩き始めました「私は何でできている? 原子だ」

  • May I introduce Major General Albert Stubblebine III,

    彼は歩調を早めて小走りになりました

  • commander of military intelligence in 1983.

    「壁は何でできている?原子だ」

  • "...[He] stared at his wall in Arlington, Virginia, and decided to do it.

    「私がやるべきことは、空っぽの空間を合せるだけだ」

  • As frightening as the prospect was, he was going into the next office.

    そして少将は、鼻を壁に強くぶつけたのです

  • He stood up and moved out from behind his desk.

    16000人の兵士を率いるスタブルバイン少将は

  • 'What is the atom mostly made of?' he thought, 'Space.'

    どうしても壁を通り抜けられずに困惑していました

  • He started walking. 'What am I mostly made of? Atoms.'

    彼はこの能力がいつの日か一般的な軍事手段になると信じていました

  • He quickened his pace, almost to a jog now.

    そんなことが本当にできるなら誰も軍を馬鹿にはしないでしょう

  • 'What is the wall mostly made of?'

    これはプレイボーイで読んだ記事なのですが

  • (Laughter)

    私にはこれが真実だと信じる理由があります

  • 'Atoms!'

    実は私の記事もそこに載っていたので

  • All I have to do is merge the spaces.

    プレイボーイを読んでいたんです

  • Then, General Stubblebine banged his nose hard on the wall of his office.

    「中ほどの国」で学んだ人間の直感では

  • Stubblebine, who commanded 16,000 soldiers,

    空気抵抗がなければ重い物体と軽い物体は

  • was confounded by his continual failure to walk through the wall.

    同時に落下するというガリレオの教えは

  • He has no doubt that this ability will one day be a common tool

    信じるのが難しいものです

  • in the military arsenal.

    それは「中ほどの国」では空気抵抗は常に存在するからです

  • Who would screw around with an army that could do that?"

    我々が真空中で進化したなら、同時だと思うでしょう

  • That's from an article in Playboy,

    また我々がバクテリアだったとしたら

  • which I was reading the other day.

    常に分子の熱運動に常に揺さぶられているので

  • (Laughter)

    違う予想でしょう

  • I have every reason to think it's true;

    しかし「中ほどの国」の住人はブラウン運動を感じるには大きすぎます

  • I was reading Playboy because I, myself, had an article in it.

    そしてまた我々の生活は重力によって支配されています

  • (Laughter)

    一方、表面張力のことはあまり気にしません

  • Unaided human intuition, schooled in Middle World,

    小さな虫ではこの優先順序は逆です

  • finds it hard to believe Galileo when he tells us

    写真の左、スティーブ=グランドは

  • a heavy object and a light object, air friction aside,

    ...右はダグラス=アダムズですが... スティーブ=グランドは著書

  • would hit the ground at the same instant.

    「創造: 生とその作成」のなかで我々の物質への先入観を

  • And that's because in Middle World, air friction is always there.

    肯定的に捉えています

  • If we'd evolved in a vacuum,

    我々は固い、実体をもったものだけが真の「物」だと考えがちです

  • we would expect them to hit the ground simultaneously.

    真空中の電磁気の揺らぎによる波などは

  • If we were bacteria,

    実在とは思えません

  • constantly buffeted by thermal movements of molecules,

    18世紀の人々は、波には波を伝える物質、エーテルが必要だと考えていました

  • it would be different.

    しかし我々にとって物質という概念が分かりやすいのは

  • But we Middle-Worlders are too big to notice Brownian motion.

    物質を想定することが生存に便利であるような

  • In the same way, our lives are dominated by gravity,

    「中ほどの国」で進化したからに過ぎないのです

  • but are almost oblivious to the force of surface tension.

    グランドにとっては渦巻も岩と同じくらいに

  • A small insect would reverse these priorities.

    実在のものなのです

  • Steve Grand -- he's the one on the left,

    タンザニアの砂漠、オル=ドニョ=レンガイ火山のふもとに

  • Douglas Adams is on the right.

    火山灰でできた砂丘があります

  • Steve Grand, in his book, "Creation: Life and How to Make It,"

    なんとその砂丘は丸ごと移動します

  • is positively scathing about our preoccupation with matter itself.

    砂漠を横切って砂丘がそっくり西の方角へ

  • We have this tendency to think that only solid, material things

    年間およそ17メートルの速度で移動するこの砂丘は

  • are really things at all.

    「バルハン」と言われています

  • Waves of electromagnetic fluctuation in a vacuum seem unreal.

    砂丘は三日月の形を保ったまま、ツノの方向へと移動します

  • Victorians thought the waves had to be waves in some material medium:

    風が砂をなだらかな斜面に沿って吹き上げて

  • the ether.

    そして砂は砂丘の頂上を越えて反対側

  • But we find real matter comforting

    つまり三日月の凹の側へと

  • only because we've evolved to survive in Middle World,

    すべり落ちるのです

  • where matter is a useful fiction.

    そして全体として三日月形の砂丘が移動します

  • A whirlpool, for Steve Grand, is a thing with just as much reality

    スティーブ=グランドは、我々も永続するものではなくて

  • as a rock.

    波のようなものだと言います

  • In a desert plain in Tanzania,

    「子供時代のことを考えて下さい」

  • in the shadow of the volcano Ol Doinyo Lengai,

    「何かはっきりした記憶」

  • there's a dune made of volcanic ash.

    「そこにいるかのように鮮明な、映像、感触...」

  • The beautiful thing is that it moves bodily.

    ...あるいは匂い」

  • It's what's technically known as a "barchan,"

    「実際、あなたはその時代、そこにいたのですから」

  • and the entire dune walks across the desert in a westerly direction

    「だから記憶があるのですよね?」

  • at a speed of about 17 meters per year.

    「衝撃でしょうが、実は違うのです」

  • It retains its crescent shape and moves in the direction of the horns.

    「あなたの体を構成する原子はひとつとして...

  • What happens is that the wind blows the sand up the shallow slope

    ...その記憶の時代のものとは同じではありません」

  • on the other side,

    「物質は移動しながら少しの間だけあなたを構成します」

  • and then, as each sand grain hits the top of the ridge, it cascades down

    「ですから、あなたの実体とあなたを構成する物質は...

  • on the inside of the crescent,

    ...関係ないのです」

  • and so the whole horn-shaped dune moves.

    「この重要な事実に、毛が逆立たないのならば...

  • Steve Grand points out that you and I are, ourselves,

    ...もう一度、読み返して下さい」

  • more like a wave than a permanent thing.

    つまり「現実に」という言葉は、軽々しく使うべきではないのです

  • He invites us, the reader,

    もしもニュートリノが脳を持っていたなら

  • to think of an experience from your childhood,

    ニュートリノの大きさの祖先から進化したのですから

  • something you remember clearly,

    岩なんてほとんどからっぽだ、と言うことでしょう

  • something you can see, feel, maybe even smell,

    我々の脳は、岩を通り抜けられない、中ほどの大きさの祖先から

  • as if you were really there.

    進化したのです

  • After all, you really were there at the time, weren't you?

    生存をする上で脳が必要とすることは

  • How else would you remember it?

    何であれ「現実」です

  • But here is the bombshell: You weren't there.

    違った種は違った世界に住んでいるのですから

  • Not a single atom that is in your body today

    そこには受け入れがたい様々な現実が存在するのです

  • was there when that event took place.

    我々が見ている現実世界は、ありのままの世界ではありません

  • Matter flows from place to place

    現実世界に対処しやすいように調整され構成された

  • and momentarily comes together to be you.

    感覚データによる世界のモデルなのです

  • Whatever you are, therefore,

    モデルの性質はどんな動物かによって変わります

  • you are not the stuff of which you are made.

    飛ぶ動物は、歩き、登り、あるいは泳ぐ動物とは

  • If that doesn't make the hair stand up on the back of your neck,

    違った種類のモデルが必要です

  • read it again until it does, because it is important.

    猿の頭脳は枝や幹からなる三次元の世界をシミュレートする

  • So "really" isn't a word that we should use with simple confidence.

    ソフトウェアを持っていることでしょう

  • If a neutrino had a brain,

    モグラが世界をモデル化するソフトウェアは

  • which it evolved in neutrino-sized ancestors,

    地下の生活に適合しているでしょう

  • it would say that rocks really do consist of empty space.

    エドウィン=アボット著「平面世界の住人」のように

  • We have brains that evolved in medium-sized ancestors

    アメンボは池の水面に暮らしているので

  • which couldn't walk through rocks.

    三次元のソフトウェアは不要でしょう

  • "Really," for an animal, is whatever its brain needs it to be

    私は、コウモリは耳で色を見れるのではないかと思っています

  • in order to assist its survival.

    コウモリは、日中に飛ぶツバメのような鳥と同じように

  • And because different species live in different worlds,

    虫を捕まえるために三次元空間を飛びまわるので

  • there will be a discomforting variety of "reallys."

    コウモリの世界のモデルは

  • What we see of the real world is not the unvarnished world,

    空を飛ぶ鳥のモデルと非常に似ているに

  • but a model of the world, regulated and adjusted by sense data,

    違いありません

  • but constructed so it's useful for dealing with the real world.

    コウモリが暗闇で音の反響を使って現状をモデルに入力し

  • The nature of the model depends on the kind of animal we are.

    一方でツバメが光を使っているのは

  • A flying animal needs a different kind of model

    状況に応じた違いにすぎません

  • from a walking, climbing or swimming animal.

    さらに、ツバメや人間が赤や青などの色によって

  • A monkey's brain must have software capable of simulating

    波長の長短を区別するのと同じように

  • a three-dimensional world of branches and trunks.

    コウモリは感じた色あいを

  • A mole's software for constructing models of its world will be customized

    音響的に「ふわふわした」とか「滑らかな」など

  • for underground use.

    表面の質感を区別するために

  • A water strider's brain doesn't need 3D software at all,

    使っていると思います

  • since it lives on the surface of the pond,

    赤が長い波長であることに特別な意味はありません

  • in an Edwin Abbott flatland.

    重要なのは、モデルの性質が知覚の種別で決まるのではなく

  • I've speculated that bats may see color with their ears.

    それがどう使われるかで決まるということです

  • The world model that a bat needs in order to navigate

    ホールデンは、ニオイが重要な役割を果す動物の世界についても

  • through three dimensions catching insects

    意見を持っていました

  • must be pretty similar to the world model that any flying bird --

    極めて濃度の低いよく似た脂肪酸、カプリル酸とカプロン酸を

  • a day-flying bird like a swallow -- needs to perform the same kind of tasks.

    犬は区別することができます

  • The fact that the bat uses echoes in pitch darkness

    その違いは、見てのとおり一方は炭素原子がひとつ余計に

  • to input the current variables to its model,

    多いだけです

  • while the swallow uses light, is incidental.

    ホールデンの推測では、人間がピアノの弦の長さを

  • Bats, I've even suggested, use perceived hues, such as red and blue,

    その音程によって感じられるのと同じように

  • as labels, internal labels, for some useful aspect of echoes --

    犬もニオイによって脂肪酸の分子量を

  • perhaps the acoustic texture of surfaces, furry or smooth and so on --

    感じられるだろう、というのです

  • in the same way as swallows or indeed, we, use those perceived hues --

    実はカプリン酸というもうひとつの似た

  • redness and blueness, etc. --

    脂肪酸があります

  • to label long and short wavelengths of light.

    違いは炭素原子がふたつ多いだけです

  • There's nothing inherent about red that makes it long wavelength.

    我々が過去に聞いたことのあるトランペットの音よりも

  • The point is that the nature of the model is governed by how it is to be used,

    ひとつ高い音程の音を想像できるのと同じように

  • rather than by the sensory modality involved.

    カプリン酸に出会ったことがない犬でも

  • J.B.S. Haldane himself had something to say about animals

    簡単にそのニオイを想像できるでしょう

  • whose world is dominated by smell.

    もしかしたらコウモリのときの議論と同じように

  • Dogs can distinguish two very similar fatty acids, extremely diluted:

    犬やサイのような嗅覚中心の動物は

  • caprylic acid and caproic acid.

    ニオイで色を感じるかもしれません。

  • The only difference, you see,

    我々が進化して本能的に扱えるようになった

  • is that one has an extra pair of carbon atoms in the chain.

    「中ほどの国」での大きさや速度の範囲は

  • Haldane guesses that a dog would probably be able to place the acids

    種々の色として見える光の波長域に少し似て

  • in the order of their molecular weights by their smells,

    狭いと言えるでしょう

  • just as a man could place a number of piano wires

    その外側の波長は特別な測定器を使わないと

  • in the order of their lengths by means of their notes.

    我々には見ることができません

  • Now, there's another fatty acid, capric acid,

    奇妙に思える微小、巨大な、または超高速の世界に対し