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  • "Going out with my baby. Going out to -- " Hi. James from www.engvid.com. Excuse me for a

  • second. Don't mean to make you wait, but I've just got to put down Mr. E because he knows

  • something you don't know about. And what he knows is it's story time. See? He's relaxing,

  • in repose, relaxing. Why? We're going to do some business phrasal verbs, okay? And these

  • business phrasal verbs -- I should explain quickly what a phrasal verb is. It's a two

  • to three-word verb, okay? In which the particle modifies the verb. I prefer to teach particles

  • because usually you know what the verb means. You just want to know how the particle changes

  • it. Right? Cool. So in this case, it's for business because these phrases or phrasal

  • verbs are often used in business. And I want to tell you a story. James is going

  • to tell you a story today. Why a story? I'll tell you the story. I will explain the phrasal

  • verbs, and then you can check after if you understood.

  • One time, a long time ago -- say, year 2000 -- in a country called America -- and for

  • some people who are complaining about me saying "America", "America" is what we call the United

  • States of America because we live in Canada. British people also call it "America". Foreign

  • people, you have a different way of calling our country, so it wouldn't be common for

  • you to know this. So I can also say, in "the United States of America" they decided -- or

  • actually, they figured out how to make more money and do less work, which they thought

  • was brilliant. So they decided to contract out all of the work from their country to

  • foreign countries. When they contracted out all of this work, some of the other American

  • people that still lived there thought that they had really -- they had sold them out.

  • They thought the companies were sellouts and had sold them out. The companies just wanted

  • to sell out all of their products -- sell out of all of their products and wanted to

  • do it as cheaply as possible. Now, because of that, what little workers remained had

  • to work extra, extra hard, and they got burned out. It was really, really terrible, but the

  • companies still wanted to make money -- wanted to roll out new products. Eventually, in the

  • year 2008, all of these companies, including the banks, needed bailouts. And that's when,

  • boys and girls, we paid for all of their decisions that they figured out.

  • Now, some of you are going, "What the heck is this guy talking about?" So the first thing

  • I want to do is go over what does "out" mean. Because, I mean, I know you know "contract"

  • or "figure" or "sell", "burn", but maybe you don't know how they are modified by "out".

  • And this is a business -- business phrasal verbs, so let's go to the board, okay?

  • When we look at "out", you can see the arrow is moving. There's a room or something, a

  • building, and the arrow is moving up this way. So the first one we look at is "outward

  • movement". "Ward" means "direction". So it means "direction out", okay?

  • The second means "not being inside". Duh! (In Canada, "duh" means "stupid". So you don't

  • go "duh" because then I'll think you're stupid.) Anyway. Sorry. "You're stupid." -- correct

  • way of doing it. So it means "not being outside". So if you move outside, then you're not inside.

  • Kind of seems obvious, right? It also means "excluding" because anything

  • that's not in the room is not part of the room. So it's "excluded", "not part of", yeah?

  • "Completing": Well, when you close the door, the room is completed, and there's no access

  • to it, "completing". And "doing thoroughly". Okay, you got me.

  • I don't know why "doing thoroughly". It just means "completing". "Doing thoroughly" is

  • similar to "completing". It means "going through the job completely, in all ways". So when

  • you do something "thoroughly", you do it properly, or you do a complete job. They seem similar.

  • Don't worry. I'll explain. First, let's talk about "contract out". What

  • does that mean? Well, a "contract" -- you'll notice I have a contract up here. It's a document

  • between two or more parties, saying they will work together, "con" meaning "with", and "tract"

  • means to "pull together". Well, when we contracted -- sorry, companies contract work. What it

  • means is to give a job to somebody outside of your company. So it means people in your

  • company don't get the work; you give it to someone else, okay? So in some instances,

  • some companies decided to make other countries make the product, and they would just sell

  • the product. So jobs were lost because it was "contracted out" -- given to another company.

  • Go look in the video on layoffs, which is in "phrasal verbs". You'll like it. I'll explain

  • what a "layoff" is. Next, "figure out". "Figure out" means to

  • -- well you can see here, "doing thoroughly". It means to "go through an idea or a problem

  • completely". Not just parts because when you figure something out, someone might say to

  • you, "How did you figure it out?" And they expect you to say, "Well, I did this, then

  • I did this, then I did this." Right? So you go "thoroughly" through the problem and examine

  • it to get the correct answer. So now, you're going to say something like,

  • "Okay, well, what does it have to do with' selling out'?" Well, if you "sell out" of

  • a product -- which is the first meaning, to "sell out of a product" -- it means there's

  • none left. "Thoroughly", "thoroughly" -- completely gone, nothing left, thorough, right? A "thorough"

  • job is a "complete" job -- nothing left, which is good. So you "sell out", and the pasta

  • is "sold out". The second meaning for "sell out" is this.

  • And I should put this here. It means "not being inside". And you'll notice that I put

  • "not being inside" here so you'll see there's one and two. Well, if you're a "sellout",

  • it means you have values or principals, things you think are true that you must do -- when

  • you're a "sellout", you get rid of those, or you exchange those values for money. So

  • when sometimes companies sell out, or, you know, a rock star he's like, rocking out,

  • and then he goes "Pepsi". You go, "what a sellout". He was a rocker. Then he sold out

  • to get a million dollars from Pepsi. Many of our companies sold out their workers

  • because they wanted to make more money, and the value was, "Deal with America, only America."

  • And they went, "But make it in China 'cause it's cheaper." That was a great American value

  • gone, like, "built in America" -- gone. They "sold out". They were outside of their values

  • because values you must stay in to make them true, all right? So being -- sorry. "Doing

  • thoroughly" is when you sell -- get rid of merchandise, so you've reduced your merchandise.

  • "Not being inside" is when you sell out your values, okay? So you notice we're going through

  • here, and you're going, "Oh, my gosh, James, they match up." Of course. Teaching is what

  • I do. Okay, so the next one we're going to do is

  • -- uh-oh, I forgot to put this one because this is a funny one to be honest. It's a little

  • funny because I have to explain it, so I'm going to do this one last, okay? In business

  • meetings, people will often say, "I would like to point out." If you watch them in court,

  • if you want to be a lawyer, always, "Judge, I would like to point out that my client was

  • a good man and is a good man." And you'll go, "What does he mean just pointing? I don't

  • understand. I see fingers going here and here." "Point out" means two things: No. 1, it means,

  • "I want to -- because there is something in here. I want to make your attention come to

  • -- come to it. Or I want to call your attention to it, so please look at it." The second meaning

  • of "point out" is, "I want to make a comment." So if I say to you, "I would like to point

  • out that yellow doesn't look good", I'm making a comment on my opinion. Or I could say to

  • you, "I would like to point out in section B-14" -- I want you to look at it. It's important

  • you look at it, okay? So "point out" has two meanings, and it means "not being inside".

  • So I'm taking the context, or I'm taking subject or the book we're looking at, and I'm taking

  • that information out so it's not inside, so you can be aware of it.

  • "Burn out": Remember we said the word "completing"? Well, when you "burn yourself out", it means

  • to "be physically or mentally fatigued". In this case it means extremely tired. When you're

  • "burnt out", it means you have no more energy to either think or no more energy to work.

  • Your body is -- it doesn't work anymore, so you're "burnt out". Many athletes after playing

  • many, many years, they're "burnt out"; they cannot do the game anymore. It doesn't work.

  • But to "burn out" at work in -- I think it's called "karoshi" in Japanese. Please correct

  • me if I'm wrong. And basically, workers who die from working -- it's crazy, they work,

  • work, work, work, work. It's like, "What happened to Johnny?" "Karoshi. Ha ha ha ha ha!" Now

  • work! Back to work!" Okay? You need some time off. Also, check that video out. So anyway,

  • "burn out". So we talked about "completing". "Burning the candle" -- no more left, okay?

  • And finally, "not being inside", "rolling out". If any of you have the new -- I must

  • look like a sellout because I keep putting Apple products up here. I didn't buy it -- buy

  • it for that. But if you buy an Apple product, and you're waiting for the newest one to come

  • out, you would say "I'm waiting for it to 'roll out'." It means for the company to launch.

  • "Launch" means "start", so when they're going to "roll out" the new product. And "rolling"

  • is this: It means they're going to start selling the new product. I'm waiting for the company

  • to "roll it out", the Apple 7, or to "launch it". Cool?

  • Now the one I took my time on -- and it was very important in my story -- was "bailout".

  • "Bail" is really funny because "bail" means, in English -- let's say there's lots of water,

  • and you need to move the water. Well, you take what's called a "pail", which is something

  • that looks like this, you know. It's got a little handle. I'm sure you've seen these

  • at your house, right? And then you put it in the water, you get the water, and then

  • you throw the water away. And that's called "bailing", okay? So it's really taking something

  • to move something somewhere else. Confusing? It should be. You take something to move water,

  • which is something, and you put it over there. Why is this important? When you "bail someone

  • out", it means they're in a bad situation, you give them some help or some money to move

  • them out of that situation. See? "Outward movement", moving him out of trouble. My man

  • is drowning. The water is over his head. You need to take the water out so he can -- he

  • can breathe. In the year 2008, something strange happened. Multimillion, multibillion, multitrillion-dollar

  • banks were having trouble. They needed to be "bailed out". That means our governments

  • took money from us -- gave it to them to get them out of trouble. Just saying, okay? But

  • you can also use "bail out" not just for money, but if someone needs help. "Jones and Smith

  • are really busy, and I don't think they have the ability to do the work. We're going to

  • need to 'bail them out'". Okay, that means, "help them".

  • Remember the story -- how I talked about bailing out the banks, and they contracted out work?

  • Now, go quiz yourself, right? What's "burn out"? What's "roll out"? Go to -- I just love

  • writing this down for people, especially people who hate this part. Excuse me, Mr. E. Go to

  • www.engvid.com, "eng" as in "English", "vid" as in "video", Okay? I'm sure you can figure

  • out how to do it. Unlike other people, we don't contract out the work here. We do it

  • ourselves, okay? And I ain't no sellout because Apple has not paid me. I want my ducats. I

  • want my dollars. Maybe we'll explain one day "ducats" and "dollars". It's another word

  • for "money" if you're a rap guy, okay? Anyway, have a good one. Take care. Mr. E, you sellout.

  • I know you, trying to roll out a product behind my back. Just pointing it out, son, just pointing it out.

"Going out with my baby. Going out to -- " Hi. James from www.engvid.com. Excuse me for a

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A2 初級

"OUT」句動詞 - ビジネス英語 ("OUT" Phrasal Verbs - Business English)

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    吳秉恆 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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