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  • Obrigado, all my Portuguese-speaking friends out there.

  • Big besos out to you guys in Brazil.

  • Hi. Thanks for watching.

  • I'm going to teach you something that maybe you've heard before.

  • But it's a little bit difficult in English.

  • You are lucky, like other languages, for example, Spanish and French, we have a lot of words

  • in English that are very similar in Portuguese and English, so if you change the accent a

  • little, use your hands a lot, people will probably be able to understand you, but sometimes

  • this is not the case, that's why we have created these things called "false friends".

  • Now, false friends are words that you think you can use because they sound almost the

  • same in English, but the meaning is completely different, so it can lead to some mistakes.

  • But if you make a mistake, who cares?

  • Really? Come on. You're learning a language, don't worry.

  • But I'm here to teach you how to correct some mistakes that you might make.

  • And thanks to Hinata and William for helping me out with this one.

  • Let's go to it.

  • So, false friends, they're not your friends, they are your enemies.

  • Okay, so the first one-we're going to start, yeah?-is: "cafeteria".

  • In your country, in Brazil, maybe in Portugal, I don't know, a cafeteria is a coffee shop,

  • so it's a place where you can go and get a delicious coffee, maybe get some delicious

  • Brazilian treats, like queijo de p�o, p�o de queijo, mm-hmm, maybe some honey moons,

  • delicious, but in English, "cafeteria", the exact same spelling, check it out: "cafeteria",

  • "cafeteria", uh-oh in English, a cafeteria, it is not a coffee shop, it is actually a

  • lunch room.

  • So, if you have a job...

  • Oh, do you have a job? Cool.

  • In Canada sometimes there is a lunch room, but all of the time in a school in Canada

  • children or students go and eat together...

  • They can eat lunch, they can eat dinner in one room, and we call this a cafeteria.

  • So, a cafeteria is a lunch room or a common room for eating.

  • Many businesses will have a cafeteria.

  • It's definitely not a coffee shop. It's pretty terrible.

  • Coffee shops are more fun than a lunch room I think.

  • The next one, in your country you can enjoy a delicious "caf�", which means coffee for

  • you, and Brazilian coffee - woo, that stuff gets you going in the morning. Cool.

  • But in English, a "caf�" is not a drink, like a coffee, a cafis a small restaurant

  • where you can buy coffee or sweets, it's like a Portuguese bakery.

  • So, a "caf�" is a restaurant in English, and "caf�" is not coffee in English.

  • You also have to be careful of your pronunciation of this word.

  • It is not: "cough", that's a cough.

  • We have to say: "coffee".

  • We don't have to say: "coffeeee"-hi, Vinnie-but you have to say: "coffee".

  • If you just say: "cough", then that's not a good thing.

  • You don't want to go to a cafand ask for a cough, because then you'd be sick.

  • Next one, you guys use as toothpaste. Right?

  • So "pasta", "pasta", "pasta", you guys know as a paste, like a gel, kind of a semi-liquid material.

  • But we always use it as a food, a very delicious Italian food called pasta.

  • You guys probably know that already because you eat a lot of pasta maybe.

  • But in English this is paste, pasta is the food.

  • You don't want to eat that stuff.

  • The next word: "dente". Yeah? You're brushing your dentes, there. Yeah? Okay.

  • So, "dente" in Portuguese means tooth or teeth, I guess just one.

  • In English it doesn't mean teeth, it means a dent.

  • To help you out with this word: "a dent" is an indentation.

  • That's the same in Portuguese.

  • So, an indentation means dent.

  • This is...

  • If you're driving your car and somebody hits your car, just a minor accident, then you

  • will have a dent in your car.

  • A dent means an indentation or it's pushed in in one area.

  • It's not completely broken, it's just pushed in or there's an indentation.

  • So it has nothing to do with your teeth.

  • It does sound like this word and the spelling is very, very similar, so be careful of that

  • false friend.

  • This is a fun one, I kind of like this.

  • I like the pronunciation of this word.

  • I have to look in my book.

  • You guys say: "balcom".

  • Mm-hmm.

  • When you guys walk into a bar you go up to the "balcao" and you order a delicious beer.

  • But not in English.

  • A "balcao" in Portuguese means a counter in a bar, this is fun.

  • We actually call the counter in a bar a bar.

  • So, if we walk into a bar or a pub or a nightclub, and we go up to the counter, we call that

  • a bar.

  • If you go into a restaurant somebody might say to you: "Would you like to sit at the

  • bar or in the restaurant?"

  • And you're a little bit confused because sitting at the bar might seem a little uncomfortable

  • because it's...

  • Got to balance.

  • But be careful, a "balcony" in English, it's very similar to a terrace.

  • So, a "balcao" sounds like "balcony", but a balcony in English is something that is

  • like an outside little portion of your house, a "terrace" is another word we can use for it.

  • That's the same in Portuguese.

  • So be careful.

  • If you're going to the balcao, you're not going to get a drink.

  • You're going to go outside for some fresh air. Balcao.

  • Next one, this is a very common mistake that I hear a lot, and it's kind of funny.

  • "Pretender", oh, let me check my pronunciation, please.

  • "Pretendor", thank you. "Pretender".

  • "Pretender", when you talk about it in Portuguese it means you intend to do something, you want

  • to do something or you will do something.

  • You're going to try.

  • But in English it sounds and looks very similar to the word "pretend", the verb "to pretend".

  • This is almost an opposite kind of meaning.

  • If you pretend to do something, you're not actually doing it, you are using your imagination

  • and you're not at all doing it in real life.

  • So, for example, I can pretend I am a horse.

  • But I don't intend to be a horse.

  • I can never...

  • I can never be a horse.

  • I'm cool with that.

  • I'd like to be a unicorn actually.

  • So, I would like to pretend to be a unicorn. Right?

  • But if you pretend to do something it's completely different, so be careful.

  • You want to do it, not pretend to do it.

  • Possibly the most comedic, which means funny for me when I think about all the Brazilians

  • around the world who come to English-speaking countries, and I think about you guys going

  • in and out of doors.

  • You are... Yeah, how many times do you get the door in your face?

  • But don't worry because I do this all the time, and I can read English.

  • So if you have a door slammed in your face because you think that "puxar" means pull,

  • but in English, it means push, then you're...

  • You're... Nope.

  • So: "puxar" in Portuguese means pull.

  • So you're pulling this way.

  • But actually it means push.

  • So it's the complete opposite.

  • So you would end up smashing your face in the door.

  • The next one that is fun as well is "empurrar".

  • "Empurrar" means...

  • Does not mean pull.

  • What? What? No, I'm confused. Hold on.

  • Empurrar in Portuguese means you push, and it sounds like "pull" in English, but it's not.

  • So, how about we do this?

  • Just try the door a little bit.

  • Don't look at the sticker, if it says "push" or "pull", just kind of try, you know, like

  • kick it with your leg or something, or...

  • You know?

  • And get your bum into it, and see what happens.

  • Or you could just wait for someone to open it, but don't feel bad because it's very confusing

  • for me, too.

  • I'm... I don't know if I'm pushing or pulling anymore.

  • Oh goodness, how are you guys ever going to get in a door?

  • Smashing your head?

  • I smashed my head on many doors.

  • I see people do this all the time.

  • I will see "pull" and be like: "Well, I can't I open the door.

  • Yeah, okay."

  • So, to recap: "puxar", yeah, this, this.

  • I don't even know what I'm doing anymore.

  • Just be careful.

  • Next one: "colar". Okay? It means...

  • You guys use it as a verb to glue something, but it's very, very close to the English word "collar".

  • Now, collar is the part of your shirt, so you can have a wide collar like in the 70s,

  • be like: "Whoa, disco mamma", or you can have a button-down collar.

  • The collar is a thing that is always on a shirt.

  • I don't have a collared...

  • I've lost my collar.

  • But it definitely does not mean the verb "to glue".

  • That's completely different and you don't want glue on your shirt because then you couldn't

  • get it off, it's pretty hot.

  • Wouldn't be very good.

  • This one I know is very confusing, and I can see why: "livaria".

  • Let's check this, this spelling.

  • "Livaria", sounds like "diarrhea", I like it.

  • "Livaria" in Portuguese is a bookstore, a place where you go and buy a book.

  • It sounds very similar to the English word: "library", but a library, free books, woo-hoo.

  • You don't have to buy the books there, you borrow the books.

  • So that means that you go and you give the librarian a book, you have the library card,

  • ding, and you get the book and you take it home.

  • That's borrow. Okay?

  • And then you go and you give it back, that's what "borrow" means.

  • You take it and you give it back.

  • So, you can't buy the books at a livaria.

  • You can borrow them.

  • The last one: "fabrica", it's a factory.

  • Okay?

  • It's a place where they make things.

  • Mm-mm, not in English.

  • "Fabrica" is very close to the English word "fabric" which means material.

  • So the fabric, for example, of my sweater, what's it made of?

  • Unicorn hair, of course.

  • Unicorn hair sweater, amazing.

  • The fabric means the material or what things are made out of, predominantly clothes, what

  • clothes are made out of.

  • Is it cotton, is it silk?

  • It's probably made in a factory, but it isn't a place, it's a thing.

  • I hope that I've confused you further with the push and the pull thing, because I don't know.

  • But I want you to understand that learning English is always difficult.

  • You're going to make mistakes; it's okay.

  • Enjoy, have fun.

  • I know you will. Until next time, bye.

Obrigado, all my Portuguese-speaking friends out there.

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ポルトガル語を話す人のための私の英語のヒント (My English tips for Portuguese speakers)

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    列空坐 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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