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  • Every year, we get a lot of requests to do sponsored shows

  • and we end up turning the vast majority of them down.

  • But every once in a while,

  • somebody approaches us and suggests something really interesting,

  • like those Punic Wars episodes we did.

  • It's usually something that, as soon as they pitch the idea,

  • we all go, "Wow, why didn't we think of that?"

  • Well, recently, the folks at Unity asked us to do a series on

  • creating your first game.

  • Frankly, I'm actually shocked we haven't addressed that before now, so

  • time to fix that!

  • The truth is, I have run into too many people

  • who at some point decided that they wanted to make games.

  • And they picked up an engine, and they started diving in

  • and they quit before they ever finished their first game

  • because the experience was just frustrating.

  • It seemed like it was going nowhere.

  • And I don't know if we can help, but

  • this team has quite a lot of collective game-making experience,

  • so hopefully some of our advice here will help you avoid the common pitfalls.

  • The first thing you're gonna wanna be careful about

  • is scope.

  • Many, many people pick up a game engine dreaming of making the types of games they play.

  • Unfortunately, this often just is not possible.

  • Games like God of War or Final Fantasy

  • are made by teams of at least 40 people,

  • sometimes way more than 40 people

  • over the course of several years.

  • Even if you're just amazing and you throw your whole life into creating your game,

  • you're not gonna make a God of War or a Final Fantasy.

  • Not even close, and especially not on your first attempt.

  • Truth is, you're not even gonna create something like Super Mario Bros. as your first game.

  • You *may* create like, 1 level's worth of Super Mari Bros.

  • but even that's kinda pushing it.

  • Your goal with your first game should be to get something built that you could actually play,

  • even in the most rudimentary fashion, as soon as possible.

  • Think of your first game as a learning exercise, not your master work.

  • If you start with a huge project, you'll find that you don't even know where to begin

  • and you'll get bogged down doing little bits and pieces that have no tangible result,

  • and it will seem like you're not making any progress at all,

  • and you'll hit roadblocks that you don't know how to overcome,

  • simply to be left flailing for what to even work on next

  • Trust me, Keep It Simple.

  • If your first attempt at making a game turns out to be

  • a one room platformer with bad collision that you took three weeks to build,

  • be proud of that, because you built it. You actually got it done.

  • You made a game.

  • That's more than most people ever manage.

  • So play it, and show it to your friends

  • and don't worry when they don't understand it or are critical because they're still thinking in terms of

  • the big budget games they're used to playing.

  • *You* know how much work went into making that game,

  • and more importantly, you know that next time you'll be able to do it even better and faster.

  • Soon, you'll be building games that people are asking you to let them play.

  • Second thing to keep in mind,

  • (and, I know that this is gonna sound weird but) don't go into your first game with a specific idea.

  • Learn what you can do, and design around that.

  • Don't lock yourself into an idea and beat your head against it for weeks or months.

  • Instead, learn a few tricks

  • watch a few tutorials, then start working towards something you're pretty sure you can build.

  • It's okay if there are still a few parts of it you have no idea how to even start to do

  • but make sure it's only a few parts when you're breaking your projects down and planning things out.

  • Which, of course, brings us to tutorials.

  • Any major engine has tons of people who happily make tutorials about pretty much everything.

  • Go find them. Watch them. Study them.

  • Then, if you're stuck or if you can't find an answer to your question, just ask.

  • You'd be shocked at how many people are happy to help you through things

  • if you just post on a forum or throw your thoughts onto the message boards.

  • And don't be afraid of coding.

  • Lots of people say that they can't code, but if you design your game right,

  • you would be shocked at how little coding you actually have to do to get something done.

  • It's a small enough amount that any of you out there watching this right now *can* handle it.

  • Again, just start small, keep it simple.

  • You'll learn as you go, and here especially there are plenty of sites out there that'll help get you started.

  • StackExchange is a fantastic place to look if you have questions.

  • Which leads us nicely into one of the big ones:

  • Design your game around *your* skills.

  • Part of understanding your scope is understanding your resources and, in this case, *you* are your resources.

  • Are you a great artist but you've never coded in your life?

  • In that case, have your game lean on your art skills

  • while pushing you just enough on the code side that you learn some new things.

  • Are you somebody who can't draw or model or animate?

  • That's alright. There are plenty of games out there that get away with what you'd call minimum graphics.

  • Accept that, and embrace it as part of your design.

  • Constraints force us to be creative.

  • And if there's something you really just *have* to have,

  • if there's some coding task or some piece of art that you game just can't live without

  • but you just don't have the chops to do it yourself, go to the asset store.

  • There is an amazing amount of stuff that you can get there for next to nothing.

  • James just talked to a professional studio that picked up their entire voice chat code from the asset store

  • for less that it would've cost them all to go to the movies.

  • James really wishes he had this sort of thing when he started out working in games. So take advantage of it.

  • Finally, don't give up.

  • There is a lot of life that's gonna get in the way.

  • Most people start out doing this between juggling a job or a full school schedule

  • and it's very, very easy to let days and then weeks pass before you get back to working on your game.

  • It's gonna be a struggle at first, no question.

  • I wish I had more comforting words for you, but all I can say is that most things worth doing are a struggle.

  • and if you stick with it,

  • maybe one day you'll have the option to make games *instead* of having to do all that other stuff.

  • But that's it for the basics.

  • I know that was all broad, basic stuff that most of you probably already knew

  • but I think it is important to start there, because when you're deep in the process of making a game,

  • it's often that real high level basic stuff that people forget.

  • But, join us next episode for more of the practical nuts-and-bolts of making your first game.

  • See you next week!

Every year, we get a lot of requests to do sponsored shows

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A2 初級

初めてのゲームを作る。基本 - ゲーム開発の始め方 - 追加クレジット (Making Your First Game: Basics - How To Start Your Game Development - Extra Credits)

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    ping に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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