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  • Lord to goodness, not again.

  • - Howdy, Drago. - Morning, Curly.

  • Makes seven times this month he come home swaggled.

  • - Only six. - Seven.

  • Six. Once was his birthday, that don't count.

  • Give me my buggy whip.

  • Didn't have anything for breakfast but two raw eggs and a mug of honey.

  • - No. - Curly.

  • Yes, Boss?

  • Don't say it's a fine morning, or I'll shoot you.

  • Get out of here, Bunyan.

  • - Good morning. - Morning.

  • Carlos, what are you doing up there?

  • I hope I get it this time, Mr McLintock.

  • My brothers, they got the big hats already.

  • All right, let them have at it.

  • Get over.

  • Ain't you gonna let me drive? You promised me you would sometime.

  • No.

  • Boss, you better watch that turn on the road!

  • You're gonna kill both of us one of these days.

  • Thank you, Mr Boss!

  • You got cattle in the back, Boss.

  • Give it up.

  • Keep them going.

  • Fifteen cents a pound, all the way to Kansas City.

  • Now, Boss, there's one old pensioner I wished you'd pass up.

  • - Bunny? - Yeah.

  • Wish I knew where I'd seen his face before.

  • He ain't an old-timer,

  • he's just been around town a couple of years.

  • You have no milk of human kindness.

  • Morning, Mr McLintock.

  • - Morning, Bunny. - Well, I can see you're in good health.

  • Never felt better, contrary to what you may hear.

  • Me, my kidneys ain't what they used to be,

  • - and my liver's being leaving me bilious. - Drago.

  • - Hello, Ben. - Hey, McLintock.

  • - Drago, throw that in the buggy. - Yes, sir.

  • - That's a scrubby bunch of sooners. - They are, at that.

  • That ought to make Douglas happy. Lining his pockets with land fees.

  • What are we gonna do?

  • I don't know what you're gonna do, Ben. Me, I do nothing.

  • Two hundred families, a quarter of beef a week for a family.

  • If they last two years, that can be a sizeable number.

  • I've got 20 head to

  • one of any other brand on the Mesa Verde. I'm not hollering.

  • Some of us haven't got all the money in the world,

  • and some of us ain't old and tired, and feel like being put upon.

  • You interest me, Young Ben. Go on.

  • So the first time I find one of our hides wearing our brand

  • hung on one of them settlers' fences, I aim to kill me a ploughboy.

  • You do what you want, McLintock. We'll do what we want.

  • Fellows my age generally call me G.W. Or McLintock.

  • Youngsters call me Mr McLintock.

  • All right, Mr McLintock.

  • Not because I'm afraid of you. You're the big he-stud of this country,

  • and I reckon a fellow my age should call you mister.

  • He's full grown now, G.W. He's a half owner of this spread.

  • I made him a full partner the day the doc gave me the long face.

  • Well, you want him to vote

  • the first time this territory becomes a state, don't you?

  • Of course I do.

  • If these settlers get burned out, there'll be a lot of hollering

  • that this country's too wild to be a state.

  • We'll go on being a territory some more,

  • with a lot of political appointees running it,

  • according to what they learned in some college,

  • where they think that cows are something you milk

  • and Indians are something in front of a cigar store.

  • I'm looking to you to hold Young Ben down.

  • I'll do what I can.

  • Come on over to the house once in a while, we'll rack up a few hands of stud.

  • G.W., that'd be just fine.

  • It's a nice morning, ain't it, Boss?

  • Everybody's entitled to their own opinion.

  • Like that again? Here's something that'll cheer you up.

  • About 1,000 head, I figure they'll bring about $12.50.

  • They're not as fat as I'd like to ship.

  • - They all off the North Range? - Yes, sir.

  • Settlers. Every one of them with a plough and a Bible,

  • and not the slightest idea what the range is for.

  • Drago!

  • - Drag out that hogleg. - Yes, sir.

  • Get me some attention.

  • People, people!

  • Come on, all of you. Gather round.

  • People, come on. Gather round.

  • I'm McLintock.

  • You people plan to homestead and farm the Mesa Verde.

  • Yes, sir. The government give us each 160 acres.

  • The government never gave anybody anything.

  • Some years back, a lot like you came in.

  • They had a pretty good first year. Good summer, easy winter.

  • But the next year, the last rain was in February,

  • and by June, even the jack rabbits had sense enough to get off the Mesa.

  • Folks, do you know who that is? That's McLintock.

  • George Washington McLintock.

  • I told them that, Douglas.

  • He controls the water rights on 200 square miles of range.

  • You know that lumber you got? It came from his land,

  • cut by his loggers and milled in his mills.

  • Douglas, I come close to killing you a couple of times when we were younger.

  • Saddens me I didn't.

  • Can you imagine a man who owns all that,

  • and mines, too, I forgot to mention them.

  • All that, and he's begrudging poor people

  • a measly 160 acres.

  • That right, Mr McLintock?

  • - You begrudge us a little free land? - There's no such thing as free land.

  • If you make these homesteads go, you'll have earned every acre of it.

  • But you just can't make them go on the Mesa Verde.

  • God made that country for buffalo. Serves pretty well for cattle,

  • but it hates the plough.

  • And even the government should know

  • that you can't farm 6,000 feet above sea level.

  • - Any trouble, Mr McLintock? - No trouble, Jeff.

  • - How about you, Douglas? - Douglas?

  • Just plain Douglas? And you call him Mr McLintock.

  • Why?

  • Well, Douglas, I guess it's because he earned it.

  • - Mr McLintock? - Yeah.

  • I'm a good hand with cattle, Mr McLintock. I'd like a job.

  • Well, you look strong enough. You come in with those sooners?

  • Yes, sir, but we don't have a homestead, and...

  • Can't use you.

  • Tough life, ain't it, sonny?

  • Hell, ain't much future in being a farmer around these parts.

  • Ladies, this is the finest Chantilly lace available anywhere.

  • - Chantilly, Mr Birnbaum. - Well, believe me, it's the best.

  • Excuse me, please. Look around, take your time.

  • Drago, I got 1,000 Havana cigars and 12 of those hats for you over there.

  • Them twelve big hats ain't gonna last long

  • the way some folks have been dipping into that redeye these days.

  • Good morning, G.W.

  • Good morning. I stole some stick candy.

  • Please help yourself. Come on in.

  • Davey, you can forget about saddling up the horse. Come in here!

  • - Problem? - Yes.

  • Well, if I were blacks, I'd move the queen's bishop to king four.

  • Yeah, you might be right.

  • You know, I was just starting to work this out when the letter came.

  • Letter?

  • - It was... - What happened? Don't you...

  • - Morning, Mr McLintock. - Morning, Davey.

  • You being here saved me a trip.

  • That hat and suit of clothes you picked out on my birthday,

  • well, instead of this cowboy hat

  • I'd like to have this one, if it's all right with you, sir.

  • That's all right with me, Davey.

  • Of course, that looks like the kind of a hat

  • a fellow would wear down Main street

  • - to start a fight. - I don't need a city hat for that.

  • All I got to do is walk down the street

  • and some wiseacre will call me an Indian, and just like that, the fight's on.

  • Davey, the letter. It's for you, and you are an Indian.

  • Yes, I know I'm an Indian. But I'm also the fastest runner in town.

  • I've got a college education, and I'm the railroad telegrapher.

  • But does anybody say, "Hello, college man," or, "Hello, runner,"

  • or, "Hello, telegrapher"? No, not even, "Hello, knothead."

  • Davey.

  • It's always, "Let the Indian do it."

  • Will you go out in the store and help the ladies?

  • All right. I'm also bookkeeper, part-time clerk.

  • Always, "Let the Indian do it."

  • A lady brought that out here this morning,

  • asked for it to be taken out to the home ranch for you.

  • Handsome lady. Kind of tall, with red hair.

  • Called me Mr Birnbaum, just as if she'd never seen me before,

  • and as if that veil that covered her face would keep me from recognizing her.

  • I thought she was in New York or Europe, or someplace.

  • So did I.

  • Jake, you better throw in a couple extra cases of the boss's favourite bourbon.

  • That stuff sure gets used up fast out at our place.

  • Which reminds me, you better start tapering off.

  • - Katherine's in town. - Katy?

  • Ladies.

  • Morning.

  • - Morning, Mr McLintock. - Morning, Mr McLintock.

  • - Good morning. - Morning, Mac.

  • - Hi, Mac darling. - Fauntleroy.

  • Good morning, G.W.

  • What are you doing in here? Why aren't you out at the desk?

  • Just helping out the bartender.

  • Yeah, I see a busy day. Give me the key to Room 17.

  • What?

  • 17, and don't advertise it.

  • Here they come, Mr McLintock.

  • Set them up.

  • - Beer. - Whisky.

  • Day off?

  • Off day.

  • Wonder what he's so preoccupied about?

  • - Haven't you heard? - No. What?

  • - Katy's back in town. - Katy?

  • Yes, dear. The social arbiter.

  • - Hi, sonny. - Good morning.

  • He sure is a polite one.

  • Mr McLintock, I don't wanna bother you...

  • I'm sorry, boy. I told you, no job.

  • Katherine.

  • George Washington McLintock.

  • I thought you'd want this.

  • First dig of the spur.

  • But who am I to upset your plans?

  • - Don't you feel kind of silly? - I never feel silly.

  • It's because you have no sense of humour.

  • Why couldn't we sit down in the hotel dining room

  • and talk about whatever it is you want to talk about?

  • Or why couldn't you just come over to the house?

  • And have everybody know that we're meeting?

  • Everybody knows, and what's the difference? We're married.

  • That is something I should like to change.

  • You know the answer, Katy.

  • That isn't why you sent for me.

  • Let's get to the rat-killing.

  • That's just the kind of remark that's always endeared you to me.

  • - Let us open the discussion. - Very well.

  • Our daughter is coming home in a few days. Rather, she's coming here.

  • It was a slip of the tongue that made me refer to this ugly hamlet as home.

  • Our daughter. Is it so hard to say her name? It's Becky.

  • Rebecca! I hate that name.

  • Anyway, she's coming home,

  • and I hoped to persuade you to let her live with me,

  • part of the time in the capital, part of the time in New York,

  • and of course, Newport during the season.

  • You're whistling in the wind, Katy.

  • If she stays here,

  • she'll become just as crude and as vulgar as all of this country.

  • And if she goes your way, she'll be all show and no stay.

  • No go, Kate.

  • I hate you. Oh, how I hate you.

  • Half the people in the world are women.

  • Why does it have to be you that stirs me?

  • - You animal. - That's the story.

  • I saw your picture in the paper at the Governor's ball.

  • You were dancing with the Governor.

  • At least he's a gentleman.

  • I doubt that.

  • You have to be a man first before you're a gentleman.

  • He misses on both counts.

  • - Hey, Sonny. You gonna ask him again? - Nope.

  • Boy, you gotta pocket your pride, you gotta beg.

  • You better listen to an expert, sonny.

  • I'm telling you, you got to grovel. Human nature, gets him every time.

  • Mister, leave me alone.

  • Everybody does it, one way or another.

  • About that job, Mr McLintock.

  • I already told you, son. I've got no need for farmers,

  • - or use for them. - Just one minute, Mr McLintock.

  • My father died last month. That's how come we lost our homestead.

  • I've got a mother and a little sister to feed. I need that job badly.

  • - What's your name? - Devlin Warren.