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  • - Yes, I believe in the Internet.

  • I believe it'll get increasingly popular,

  • and we're doing some neat, new things

  • to take advantage of that.

  • When you have the level of success that we've had,

  • when you have a business that's important as this

  • with this many competitors,

  • you're going to have people saying some nasty things.

  • The lives all over the world should be

  • treated with the same value that we treat lives

  • here in the rich world.

  • If you ask people across the United States,

  • "Is the future going to be better than the past?",

  • most say no.

  • - He's an American entrepreneur,

  • author, investor, and philanthropist.

  • In 1975, he co-founded Microsoft which went on to become

  • the world's largest PC software company.

  • He's currently the richest person in the world

  • with an estimated net worth of $84 billion dollars.

  • He's Bill Gates, and here's my take on

  • his top 10 rules for success, volume two.

  • Rule number two is my personal favorite,

  • and stick around all the way to the end

  • for a special bonus clip.

  • As always, as Bill is talking,

  • if he says something that really resonates with you,

  • please leave it in the comments below

  • and put quotes around it

  • so other people can be inspired as well.

  • Enjoy.

  • (inspirational music)

  • - You really have to believe

  • the Internet's going to be mainstream,

  • a lot of people are going to get out there and use it,

  • and that they're going to be willing

  • to pay for some content.

  • - [Charlie] Is that the operating idea that you have?

  • - Each of these businesses

  • is an entrepreneurial business.

  • The overreaching theme is that yes,

  • I believe in the Internet.

  • I believe it'll get increasingly popular,

  • and we're doing some neat, new things

  • to take advantage of that.

  • - You've got a lot of cash on hand.

  • Yes?

  • - Right.

  • - [Charlie] All right (laughing).

  • It puts you in an enviable position.

  • You can experiment with a lot of entrepreneurial ideas

  • and see what sticks and what flies.

  • - We're in business to make money.

  • - [Charlie] The other thing is providing

  • such a cash flow for you.

  • - [Bill] Well, it all belongs to the shareholders.

  • - [Charlie] Yes.

  • - We're not dilettantes.

  • - [Charlie] No, I know.

  • - We are business people, and

  • it is true that if you find an idea

  • that requires three or four years

  • of improvement and patience and really sticking with it

  • that we're very good at that.

  • Take Windows, which we bet our company on.

  • Everybody who doubted that would succeed,

  • IBM did not support us in that.

  • It took longer than we expected,

  • over four years before finally

  • graphical interface got popular

  • and now people take it for granted.

  • It's part of every personal computer,

  • and you just expect it to be there.

  • That was one of the grand successes of the company.

  • In the same way we're betting on the Internet,

  • that our tools there will be popular

  • and that a few of these content plays

  • that we've decided to get involved in,

  • that the scale and the users

  • will make those into great businesses.

  • Well, certainly every product we do

  • is absolutely as capable as it can possibly be.

  • There's no holding back.

  • The people at Microsoft

  • come into work everyday

  • building the best products they can,

  • and they're very proud.

  • Go into schools and see how kids are using this stuff.

  • Go and ask people about how their jobs have changed

  • because of the personal computer.

  • - [Interviewer] Sure.

  • - We're sitting there listening to our customers

  • saying how they'd like to make things better.

  • We do absolutely our best job.

  • In fact, that's why we've been successful.

  • Anybody who holds back in this business

  • isn't going to be around for long because

  • this is a business where you always have to be

  • moving at a very rapid pace.

  • - You have, for years, ever since you were a little boy,

  • I hear, have been called a nerd.

  • Do you care?

  • Does it hurt you?

  • - Well, nerd means a lot of things.

  • I'm somebody who can

  • sit and read a book about science for hours on end.

  • I don't mind being labeled as somebody

  • who finds that interesting.

  • - [Barbara] There is hardly a day

  • in which something is not written about Microsoft.

  • It has become almost a frenzy.

  • You are being called the evil empire.

  • Forget being called a nerd.

  • You are now being called arrogant, greedy, the Devil.

  • You've read all this stuff

  • or heard that this has been said.

  • What do you say about all of this?

  • - Well, it's a very competitive business.

  • - That's all?

  • - [Bill] Oh no, absolutely.

  • When you have the level of success that we've had,

  • when you have a business that's important as this

  • with this many competitors,

  • you're going to have people saying some nasty things.

  • You have to learn a little bit

  • not to take it too personally.

  • - You went to Harvard and you dropped out.

  • Have you ever thought how your life could be better off

  • if you had gotten your Harvard degree?

  • - [Bill] Well, I'm a weird dropout

  • because I take college courses all the time.

  • I love learning company courses and things,

  • so I love being a student.

  • There were smart people around.

  • They fed you.

  • They gave you these nice grades that made you feel smart.

  • I feel it was unfortunate

  • that I didn't get to stay there

  • but I don't think I missed any knowledge because

  • whatever I needed to learn

  • I was still in a learning mode.

  • People who have been successful are often,

  • not always, pretty fanatical about

  • the thing they're trying to do.

  • I remember one industry panel

  • where there were about seven people and the debate was

  • would the computer interface be this character-mode thing

  • or would be it be graphic user interface?

  • At the time, the graphic user interface stuff was so slow

  • it was laughable.

  • Writing software for it was so bad.

  • It was Windows 1.0.

  • The people on the panel were saying, "No, no.

  • "This is kind of a stupid thing."

  • I would say, "No, believe me.

  • "This'll be great."

  • One of the guys on the panel said,

  • "Hey, Bill is wrong,

  • "but Bill works harder than the rest of us.

  • "Even though it's the wrong solution,

  • "he's likely to succeed."

  • That was the best compliment I ever had.

  • Just by working day and night,

  • I could send the industry in some direction.

  • I was fanatical in that period of time, that is,

  • I didn't believe in vacation.

  • I didn't believe in weekends.

  • It turned out that worked for me that

  • we got our company going at a speed

  • that allowed it to make mistakes faster

  • than other people were and kind of see those mistakes.

  • - [Charlie] Do you worry about Linux as a competition

  • for operating systems?

  • - [Bill] Yes.

  • We've competed against various forms

  • of Unix over the years,

  • and Linux is growing in popularity

  • and definitely a competitor.