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  • Carb-Loaded: A Culture Dying to Eat

  • This is Lathe

  • I've know him and his wife for almost 20 years.

  • In fact, about ten years ago

  • we started our own company together.

  • In 2009, Lathe was 36 years old

  • and weighed 165lbs.

  • He pretty much ate the standard American diet,

  • exercised regularly,

  • and was precisely the same weight he was

  • throughout his senior year of high school.

  • But then Lathe received some shocking news.

  • Okay, you're Mister Poland...Uhhh

  • Ah yes, you have diabetes!

  • Anyway, with no family history of the disease,

  • and a diet that most nutritionists would consider healthy,

  • shouldn't Lathe be the last person with diabetes?

  • How did this happen?

  • Is Lathe an exception to the rule,

  • or part of an emerging trend?

  • Did this have something to do with his

  • so called "heart-healthy" diet?

  • and most importantly..

  • (interupts) Hey real quick, do we...

  • do we go straight here, or do we take this left?

  • Hmmm, yeah I would take the left up ahead

  • Okay good, uh sorry! What were you saying?

  • No worries, I was just thinking.

  • How many of the health problems we are witnessing today

  • are a result of our modern food culture?

  • That's a good question.

  • Definitely!

  • Hey did you take that left?

  • ♪♪ Up beat electronic music♪♪

  • Carb-Loaded: A Culture Dying to Eat

  • With advances in medicine, it would seem

  • that people should be healthier now then ever before.

  • However it's starting to appear the opposite is the case.

  • Most experts agree we have a serious problem.

  • We are seeing an epidemic explosion of chronic diseases

  • such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer

  • The list goes on and on.

  • We've talking about epidemic obesity forever.

  • We started talking about pandemic obesity

  • because much of the world's population is now effected

  • In the United States, where rates of obesity are high

  • and maybe stabilizing at that very high level,

  • we really have hyper endemic obesity- a fixed high level.

  • Once we start feeling like we're plateauing,

  • it starts to head back up again in different age groups.

  • We are in a crisis.There's no other way to put it, we are in a crisis.

  • A look at our society reveals an alarming rise in heart disease,

  • hypertension, cancer, alzheimer's

  • obesity, fatty liver disease

  • and, of course, diabetes.

  • Are you serious? It says here

  • there is more than one kind of diabetes?

  • That's true, and diabetes has been plaguing mankind

  • for a very long time. In fact,

  • diabetes was first mentioned in medical literature

  • almost 2,000 years ago.

  • The term diabetes was first coined

  • of Aretaeus of Cappadocia

  • in the early second century.

  • In 1675, the word "Meletus"

  • (which means "sweet like honey")

  • was added by Thomas Willis

  • after discovering the urine of his patients

  • was sweet.

  • How would he even figure that out?

  • (Slurping sound)

  • 100 years later, and the presence of excess sugar in a diabetic's

  • urine and blood was confirmed. Hence the sweetness.

  • What could possibly cause a person's blood or urine to be sweet?

  • To find out, we will need to meet an important character,

  • the pancreas

  • The pancreas is part of the endocrine system

  • and produces important enzymes and hormones

  • that help us break down foods.

  • This includes insulin which regulates the body's glucose

  • or "sugar level"

  • A healthy pancreas

  • is able to produce these enzymes and hormones,

  • at the right time

  • in the right quantities,

  • in order to properly digest the food we eat.

  • When a person has Type 1 diabetes,

  • the pancreas is being attacked by the body's own cells,

  • and can no longer produce insulin

  • to remove sugar from the blood stream.

  • In the case of Type 2 diabetes,

  • due to the volume and frequency of insulin being released,

  • receptor cells become less sensitive to the insulin

  • this "insulin resistance" results in less sugar

  • being removed from the blood. Sadly, over

  • 360 Million people worldwide find themselves

  • in this situation.

  • Regardless of the specific type,

  • overall diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S.

  • and the 8th leading cause of death worldwide.

  • You may be surprised to learn that obesity rates are growing faster

  • in the youngest members of our society. Since the year 2000,

  • pre-diabetes and diabetes cases in children have nearly tripled.

  • Two to five year olds lead this frightening trend.

  • A closer look reveals there's even an epidemic of obese infants.

  • We have tripled obesity rates in the last 30 years in our children

  • There are one in three children now with a weight issue,

  • either overweight or obese.

  • The Centers for Disease Control have said that of the children born

  • in the year 2000, one out of every three Caucasians, and one out of every

  • two African Americans and Hispanics are going to get diabetes

  • in their lifetime. They've gone further to say that this is the same

  • generation that will be the first in our countries history to die at a

  • younger age than their parents because of what we feed them.

  • This used to be a disease that was past 65, it was old people that

  • had diabetes, and so this shift in the age group is

  • what's very frightening.

  • When 8 year olds are getting adult onset diabetes,

  • due largely to epidemic obesity,

  • stands to reason that 10 years later

  • by the time they turn 18, they will have coronary disease.

  • They'll start turning up in our emergency rooms.

  • Should current trends persist into the not too distant future,

  • the day may well dawn when angina

  • is an adolescent right of passage along side acne.

  • That may sound imponderable,

  • but not all that long ago

  • the notion of adult onset diabetes in 8 year olds

  • would have been equally outrageous.

  • According to the CDC, if this keeps up, by the year 2050

  • 1 in 3 Americans will be diabetic

  • and nearly 1 in every 2 Americans will be obese.

  • Not overweight-

  • OBESE!

  • The U.S. and western civilization

  • and soon the entire world,

  • have an obesity and diabetes epidemic.

  • The obesity epidemic is fueling the numberof cases

  • that we see who have diabetes.

  • Diabetes in itself

  • is a risk factor for developing heart disease,

  • kidney failure, eye disease,

  • blindness, nerve damage, foot amputations

  • and so the implications of diabetes are tremendous.

  • Diabetes isn't just hurting our health

  • it's also emptying our pockets because

  • everyone ends up paying for diabetes.

  • By 2012, diabetes related costs in the United States,

  • reached an estimated 245 billion dollars.

  • That was a 41 percent increase

  • from just 5 years earlier.

  • That number includes direct medical costs,

  • absenteeism, diabetes related job loss,

  • and productivity loss due to premature deaths.

  • 1 out of every 5 dollars spent on health-care in the United States

  • goes to the care of people with diabetes.

  • The worldwide cost is over 470 billion dollars.

  • Should current trends persist to about the middle of this century,

  • 1 in 3 Americans will be diabetic. Now right now

  • out of a population of over 300 million there are about 27 million

  • diagnosed diabetics in the U.S. That's pretty bad! We're having trouble

  • paying the healthcare bills right now. 1 in 3 of us

  • would be over 100 million people.

  • I don't think there is any way to pay that bill.

  • I think we find ourselves on the front lines

  • of nothing less than homeland security.

  • So I think the fate of the nation hangs in the balance.

  • The cost of diabetes alone

  • is astronomically large, and it will impact

  • on society's ability to handle healthcare costs

  • and expenditures if we don't make change.

  • Of course, while diabetes and obesity

  • get most of the attention in the news,

  • many experts believe they are actually parts of a

  • much larger and more sinister pandemic, and

  • the name of this pandemic is Metabolic Syndrome.

  • Sufferers have symptoms like high blood pressure, high blood sugar,

  • excess body fat and abnormal cholesterol levels.

  • Over 124 million Americans

  • are sick from this under-reported condition. It is estimated that

  • 75 percent of our healthcare dollars are, in fact, spent on the

  • treatment of people suffering from Metabolic Syndrome. So there is an

  • entire population that is already sick and may not even be aware of it.

  • A common bias is that the overweight

  • and obese members of society are the sickest ones.

  • Incorrectly, thin people might, in fact, think of obesity as a way to

  • identify the sick people around them.

  • We see plenty of individuals who look great,

  • whose body mass index is in the normal range,

  • who don't have excessive body fat; and yet they're already

  • in trouble, and they don't know it

  • because their diets are such

  • that they are already changing their proteins

  • by having to much sugar in their bloodstream.

  • They are already developing fatty liver because they are eating

  • a lot of fructose for example.

  • This has been turned into a moralistic and character

  • type issue, where individuals who struggle with their weight

  • are "killing themselves" and are "lazy gluttons"

  • because we know there

  • are millions of "skinny fat" people who are

  • metabolically sick inside, but do not look

  • characteristically sick on the outside.

  • Now they are saying skinny people are fat

  • even though they are already skinny.

  • This IS serious!

  • In fact, it's seriously bringing me down.

  • I mean, does anyone even know how this happened?

  • How did this happen?

  • Experts agree there are many factors

  • that account for our current health crisis.

  • For people effected by diet related illness,

  • the answer is more than likely a combination of many factors.

  • And these can take place over

  • a long period of time.

  • A lifetime,

  • and even generations.

  • For example,

  • We're eating more food than ever before.

  • It's not just that fact that our

  • restaurant portions have grown dramatically,

  • but our home cooking portions have grown in turn.

  • We bring those portions sizes home with our eyeballs.

  • We see what we get on plates elsewhere,

  • and we bring them home to our own personal plates.

  • We've sort of defined a new norm with portions

  • where a very large plate of food

  • looks like a normal amount of food.

  • Whereas in the old days,

  • we would have looked at that and said, "Oh my God

  • that's enough to feed an army or a whole family!"

  • Now we look at that and say,

  • "That's my dinner"

  • If you take a study of

  • 'The Last Supper'

  • we end up finding that if you look

  • at just depictions of 'The Last Super'

  • over the last 1,000 years,

  • portion sizes have increased

  • 69 percent. Plate size increased 66 percent,

  • even bread size increased about 26 percent.

  • People have no idea

  • that with just the passing of every decade,

  • we put more and more on our plate.

  • I visited my parents in Germany

  • where I grew up,

  • and I have a plate in my hand

  • and I asked my mom,

  • "Where are the dinner plates?"

  • "Oh you are holding one in your hand"

  • "No, no that's an appetizer plate where's the dinner plate?"

  • and she said, "No, we have not changed our plates in 25 years.

  • This is a dinner plate that you are holding."

  • By virtue of having lived in this country for over ten years,

  • I've gotten used to the large portion sizes here.

  • But to truly understand the current health situation,