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  • Hello, this is Ray!

  • Today I want to talk about some Chinese words that are very hard to translate into English.

  • Translation requires certain skills and knowledge.

  • Being good at Chinese and English doesn't equal to a good translator.

  • Translation is an ability developed through a long time of training and experience.

  • But no matter how experienced you are,

  • There are just some words in Chinese that are very hard to translate into English.

  • I think there are two possibilities:

  • First, the word has too many meanings under different circumstances.

  • So there isn't an exact corresponding word in English

  • that has the same variety of meanings.

  • Second, the concepts of the word might not exist in foreign countries.

  • Therefore, it is hard to translate the word due to cultural differences.

  • I've collected some Chinese words that are difficult to translate,

  • and I'm just going to translate them no matter how bad the translation is.

  • Well I mean, to "explain", to explain in English.

  • I also hope to discuss with you guys.

  • "加油" could mean...good luck,

  • cheer up,

  • encourage to do better,

  • or to do your best...

  • Way too many meanings!

  • Oh I know, you can say "fighting"

  • "Fighting!"

  • Nope, that's Korean.

  • If we look at these meanings separately,

  • you can say "good luck" for "祝好運"

  • "cheer up" for "安慰人"

  • "keep it up" for "勉勵人"

  • "go for it" for "鼓勵人".

  • Another explanation is that,

  • you can describe it as "我支持你"

  • In English, that is "I'm rooting for you".

  • The word "靠杯" is from Taiwanese.

  • The usage is really complicated.

  • It's even hard to explain it in Chinese, you know what I'm saying?

  • How about you tell me what exactly does "靠杯" mean?

  • For example, you can tell someone to stop "靠杯".

  • Or you can describe a person as "靠杯".

  • They mean different things.

  • And there are many Facebook pages that belong to "靠杯" series.

  • "靠杯" girlfriend.

  • "靠杯" boyfriend.

  • "靠杯" husband.

  • "靠杯" wife.

  • "靠杯" NTHU.

  • "靠杯" engineers.

  • "靠杯"...planet!

  • "靠杯" planet, and 靠杯 planet.

  • There is really no such a word in English that contains those meanings.

  • But we can try to break it down.

  • When "靠杯" is used as a verb, it means "抱怨".

  • In English it could be "complain", "whine", or "grumble".

  • Thus if you want to tell a person to stop "靠杯" or "抱怨"

  • You could say "stop complaining"

  • "stop whining" or "stop grumbling".

  • If you want to describe a person as "靠杯",

  • it should mean he is really "機車",

  • at the same time,

  • a bit funny also.

  • How do you even translate it?

  • How the hell am I supposed to do with it?

  • Ok, so if we want to describe a person as "機車",

  • we can just use the word "annoying".

  • But there is more to that, which is the meaning "funny".

  • Alright, annoying and funny at the same time.

  • Oh, okok, I know how to do this.

  • I get it.

  • The best solution is to put "annoying"

  • and "funny"

  • together as

  • "annoyingly funny"

  • ......

  • Yep, I suck, but whatever.

  • This one is actually not that hard.

  • It's just hard to translate into something that is easy to understand.

  • "孝順" in English is "filial piety".

  • Let's break it down, filial means son and daughter.

  • Piety means respect, or even veneration.

  • Why is it hard to understand? Because even if you translate in this way,

  • it's still hard for foreigners to get it,

  • since it's not a common word.

  • I think it might be that in our culture,

  • filial piety is highly valued.

  • It's probably not very common in foreign countries.

  • In western culture, kids are eager to be independent.

  • They don't usually live with their parents when they become adults.

  • They gather with families only on important holidays and festivals.

  • Yeah, so, I AM a filial son.

  • I still live with my parents till now.

  • Alright, this word can also be used in many situations.

  • But the most common one is to express appreciation.

  • For example,

  • I work hard and upload videos on time every week.

  • There might be people want to say "辛苦了" to me.

  • I don't know, I mean

  • there MIGHT be people who want to say that to me

  • right?

  • If you want to express "謝謝一個人付出的努力"

  • you could say "thanks for your hard work".

  • Another situation is that

  • when someone achieved something after a demanding process.

  • In this case, you can say

  • "Nice work!", "Well done!" or just "You did it!"

  • I think the word "中二" is also really deep.

  • It has many meanings. Like what?

  • For example, self-centered, delusional, childish,

  • and wants to attract attentions by all kinds of weird acts.

  • Try describe this kind of people.

  • I'm not sure whether this word comes from Japan or Korea.

  • Because in those two languages,

  • they both have the exact same word.

  • 중2병 & ちゅうにびょう

  • Alright, so if you want to express

  • all the characteristics above at once, you can say

  • You are a self-centered

  • delusional, childish, attention-seeking brat.

  • Phew, it feels good right.

  • Or you can just use a very recent usage.

  • We Asian cultures do affect English sometimes.

  • It is called, "Eighth Grade Syndrome".

  • That is the American version of "中二病".

  • I'm not bullshiting right here. I'm not.

  • You can google it, there is actually people using that word.

  • "默契" is like, having deep understanding of each other,

  • and work very well together.

  • This kind of relationship is like plant and

  • I

  • plantie, this plant right here, plantie.

  • So to describe "默契" you can use "mutual understanding",

  • and "make a great team".

  • Ok, it sounds bad when saying them separately.

  • There is another way to say this,

  • "to have great chemistry with someone".

  • It means two people get along very well.

  • But usually, it is used between a boy and a girl.

  • Therefore, if you happen to be describing

  • the "默契" between you and your lover,

  • then it's appropriate to say that.

  • Alright, today I talked about so many Chinese words that are hard to interpret.

  • Do you feel like I just randomly came up with the translations?

  • Oh no, I mean, did I answer you guys' questions?

  • Although we've talked about today,

  • I believe that there are still many Chinese words that are hard to translate left.

  • If you have some examples, please leave the message to tell us.

  • Maybe we could do an episode 2!

  • If you like this video, press like!

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  • you can click the button right here to subscribe to our YouTube channel!

  • We have new video come out every Monday and Thursday, at 9 o'clock!

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  • Just type in "阿滴英文" or "Ray Du English" to find us!

  • And that’s a wrap, thank you guys for watching, as always

  • and I’ll catch you guys next time! See ya!

Hello, this is Ray!

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A2 初級

翻訳するのが難しい中国語の単語 (Difficult Chinese Words to Translate)

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    Yo-Yo幽幽 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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