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  • A Resource-Based Economy in its working state is really quite simple

  • deceptively simple given the complexity, imbalance

  • confusion and uncertainty of the monetary-market system

  • that we all endure today:

  • a method I will point out as I go along

  • that is completely decoupled from the natural world, from human needs.

  • It exists as a mere abstraction floating in the air.

  • In Part Three: Objections and Projections

  • which will hopefully be a little bit fun

  • I will touch upon some of the more common criticisms of this direction

  • along with what we, those of us that identify with this

  • in a very sincere way, are likely to expect

  • as this direction gains more attention across the world.

  • I think it's really important we come to terms with the inevitable hostility

  • that arises when we broach the deep-seeded subjects that we do.

  • It's important to remember that we are all victims of culture

  • as has been pointed out by previous speakers

  • and while many people are indeed

  • coming to terms with the growing social problems

  • and do see the Zeitgeist Movement, the Venus Project and the Resource-Based Economy

  • as a viable solution, there are also many

  • that have a very powerful identification with the current model

  • and in all seriousness, view our work as an extreme threat

  • to their identity, and it's something that unfortunately I think will grow.

  • [applause] You're applauding that?

  • You're funny.

  • Then in Part Four, I will talk briefly about the transition

  • something that's also been alluded to very well.

  • I come at it from a similar angle although a little more general.

  • The complexity and lack of predictability it holds is often illusive

  • to those that immediately hear about this information

  • and ask the immediate question "How do we do it? " Changing the world is not easy

  • especially when the concept presented is probably the most radical

  • social shift this species has ever faced or considered.

  • But this is why we're here. The core interest of the Zeitgeist Movement is...

  • The defining interest is to put our heads together

  • to work together, to figure out how to actually get this done.

  • That's why we're here.

  • If anyone, by the way, is simply waiting for me to tell them what to do

  • or anyone else to guide their way, sorry you're going to be disappointed.

  • The Zeitgeist Movement is not a follow-the-leader movement.

  • The only way this movement will work is if each one of you in this audience

  • each one of you listening to this webcast or viewing this event archive

  • in the future, sees the merit of this and is prepared

  • to take the time and sacrifice to become an expert

  • on this material and be able to transmit it to your fellowman in a fluid way.

  • [applause] Thank you.

  • I've ended two of my previous films with "The Revolution is now" and I want to clarify:

  • The Revolution is a revolution of thought.

  • It's a revolution of creativity, of ingenuity, a revolution of consciousness.

  • I want to make it very, very clear that this

  • is an information-based movement. It's an enlightenment of understanding

  • what can be if we cared enough.

  • Part One: A Self-Generating Model

  • A wise man once said "The most profound understandings

  • tend to be the most obvious, yet overlooked."

  • I want everyone to keep that in mind as I run down the following section

  • for as elementary as what I'm about to point out may seem

  • these issues are far from being given the relevance they deserve.

  • You know that 'of course mentality'.

  • Those who say that tend to not understand what you are saying.

  • Natural Law:

  • A natural law is a property of what we call nature

  • or the whole of the physical phenomenon around us

  • to which we are symbiotically connected.

  • Classic example is the law of gravity.

  • [It] doesn't matter how much faith I have

  • to believe I can jump up right now and dance on the ceiling.

  • The law of gravity simply won't allow it.

  • Since the effects of gravity are also measurable and predictable

  • becoming a tool, this knowledge becomes the basis of inference

  • which we use to make more accurate decisions.

  • Once this law was discovered, all sorts of possibilities began to emerge

  • and the world became a little bit more intelligent about what was possible

  • and what wasn't, when it comes a phenomenon related to it.

  • It builds up upon... We build upon natural law.

  • As another example, before the germ basis of disease

  • was discovered by Louis Pasteur, there were many ineffective

  • and outright dangerous treatments for human sickness

  • (as anyone who studies medical history will know)

  • and we look back at these strange

  • suspicious and often superstitious methods

  • and wonder, how could we possibly have been so misinformed?

  • Yet, we seldom recognize this trend as a universal

  • and how it applies to us today. Most rarely consider

  • that many of our current modern practices might be in the same boat

  • to be looked back upon by future human societies which will wonder

  • "What the hell were they thinking?

  • Didn't they see the natural law referent for that issue?"

  • Etcetera.

  • The point here is that the evolution of scientific discoveries

  • discoveries which always originate from feedback

  • from the natural world, constantly refine our understandings

  • (if we're open to receive it, which is a conversation in and of itself).

  • It creates dependable, testable reference

  • that we can use to assist in our reasoning about the problems

  • solutions or even invention.

  • The process of transfer or reason from a given law

  • to an extrapolated conclusion

  • is called inferential logic

  • as if anyone's ever studied these things in college.

  • Nearly every man-made thing you see in the modern world

  • is essentially a product of this reasoning.

  • Everything. However there is a one area of human life

  • which we all have to admit goes virtually untouched

  • by the natural law 'reference'

  • and the extrapolation of this reasoning

  • and that is our Social System.

  • Somehow human organization is excluded here.

  • For some reason the social arrangement that we utilize goes untouched

  • as evolution continues as information.

  • It exists as one of the most dated practices of organization I think we have left.

  • I can break off into many different areas from this point

  • in regard to how provably ineffective and archaic

  • the whole of human social management is conducted

  • from our prison systems

  • to the banking oligarchs that we blindly accept

  • to the grand distortion that I literally could talk for hours on end

  • and if you hadn't seen my prior presentations, 'Social Pathology'

  • I strongly suggest them, but that's not the point

  • of what this presentation is about because I want to hone in.

  • I want to narrow it down to one thing

  • and that is universal human needs.

  • Many, throughout modern history, have been trying

  • to find a universal distinction for what we call human nature

  • a very open word these days used almost flagrantly by the population.

  • The question becomes "What traits are universal

  • across the whole of the human species? " You really can't define human nature

  • without that essentially being the case.

  • Rather than speculate, which is what the great majority of public does

  • (and I'm going to talk about it later as an argument that moves against us.

  • People often bring this up. ) let's actually think about

  • what we actually know.

  • Human nature in a general sense is at least

  • a set of immutable human needs

  • that run through the species without exception.

  • Needs which not only govern our physical health (which is the first thing

  • most people think of when they think of a human need such as food)

  • but can actually also trigger different predictable behavioral

  • and physiological tendencies that are quite elusive in the organism

  • that are not readily apparent in the sense of causality

  • that we typically think of.

  • Furthermore, it isn't just those needs must be met

  • in a traditional 'input' sense. There's also the very real need

  • for all of us to have protection against other forms of stimulus

  • that can corrupt and distort us.

  • As will be touched upon in a moment, certain environmental or social stressors

  • for example, can create profound

  • yet initially unnoticed consequences in human development

  • and it's a very misunderstood and underappreciated fact.

  • Needless to say, if I don't get proper nutrition: water, air

  • I will cease to exist over time.

  • If I'm exposed to substances that are chemically toxic

  • to my biology, such as ingesting mercury

  • I will likely get very sick or have permanent brain damage.

  • If I suffer serious vitamin deficiency as a child

  • there's a predictable detrimental outcome for my personal health

  • such as stunted growth or immunity deficiencies.

  • Human needs do not stop at that basic level.

  • Humans are bio-psychosocial organisms

  • meaning we are affected by our environment, symbiotically

  • in very subtle and complex ways.

  • and before I continue... Who's water is this? It's mine? Beautiful.

  • (Audience member) It's all ours.

  • [applause]

  • For instance

  • if a mother in the late stages of pregnancy

  • suffers extreme emotional stress

  • flooding her system with cortisol (a stress hormone)