Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Hi, I'm Rob and welcome to another Woodward English video.

  • Today we're going to learn about the correct pronunciation

  • of ED at the end of words in English.

  • In English there are many words that end inED

  • There are regular verbs in the past tense

  • for example: wanted, helped, called.

  • There are regular past participles

  • needed, looked, cleaned

  • and they're also many adjectives that end in ED

  • for example infected, relaxed, closed.

  • Did you notice how the ED was pronounced in three different ways?

  • How is the ED pronounced in the first column?

  • wanted, needed, infected

  • The ED sounds like /id/

  • wanted, needed, infected

  • How is the ED pronounced in the second column?

  • helped, looked, relaxed

  • the ED sounds like a T or a /t/ sound

  • helped, looked, relaxed

  • How is the ED pronounced in the third column?

  • called, cleaned, closed

  • The ED sounds like a D or /d/

  • called, cleaned, closed

  • So why do you pronounce the ED at the end of words in three different ways?

  • Well first we need to learn about the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless sounds in English.

  • A VOICED sound means that it uses the vocal cords

  • and it produces a humming sound or a vibration here in your throat.

  • Put your fingers on your throat here and pronounce the letter L

  • You notice there's a vibration here in this part of your neck.

  • This is because it is a voiced sound.

  • A voiceless sound, sometimes called an unvoiced sound,

  • is when there's no vibration here and the sound comes from your mouth.

  • For example, if we pronounce the letter P

  • Where does this sound come from? It comes from the front of your mouth.

  • It doesn't come from here ... /p/ ... no it doesn't sound good.

  • /p/ from the front of your mouth

  • Now try this with the other letters and you'll feel the difference

  • between a voiced sound and an unvoiced sound.

  • For example .../sh/

  • the SH sound .../sh/ ... Where does it come from?

  • It comes from your mouth. It doesn't come from here, it comes from your mouth.

  • So it is a voiceless sound.

  • How about F .../f/... the F sound .../f/...

  • Where does the sound come from? Does it come here? .../f/... No, it comes from your mouth again.

  • So it is a voiceless sound.

  • How about the N sound the .../n/... /n/... sound.

  • You notice it vibrates a little here .../n/...

  • So N, the .../n/... sound is a voiced sound.

  • And the .../z/... sound the Z the .../z/... or the S sometimes .../z/...

  • It comes from here so it is a voiced sound.

  • Now we know the difference between voiced and voiceless sounds,

  • we can now look at the following rules about the correct

  • pronunciation of ED in English

  • If the last letter of the word ends in a T or D, like WANT or NEED

  • then the ED is pronounced as an .../id/... sound

  • wanted, needed

  • The .../id/... or the ED

  • adds an extra syllable to the word.

  • want (one syllable), wanted (two syllables)

  • need (one syllable), needed (two syllables)

  • So if the word ends in D or T

  • then you add the .../id/... sound to the end.

  • If the last letter of the word ends in a voiceless sound

  • like the P in help

  • Then the ED is pronounced as a .../t/... sound

  • so help becomes helped

  • It is important to know that we do not add an extra syllable

  • With the word help he say helped which is one syllable

  • and not "help-ed", two syllables that doesn't sound good

  • Let's go through the list and pay attention to the sound of the ED ending.

  • helped, looked, sniffed, laughed

  • the GH here is pronounced like an F so it is laughed

  • washed, watched, kissed, danced, fixed

  • They all end in a .../t/... sound

  • If the last letter of the word ends in a voiced sound

  • like the L in call

  • then the ED is pronounced as a .../d/... sound.

  • So call becomes called

  • Again it is important to remember that we do not add an extra syllable, no.

  • So the word call, we say called (one syllable)

  • and not "call-ed" which is two syllables and incorrect.

  • Let's go through the list and pay attention to the sound of the ED ending.

  • called, cleaned, offered, damaged, loved

  • used... here the S sounds like a .../z/... sound

  • used, amazed, rubbed

  • They all end in a D sound a .../d/... sound

  • Also, when a word ends in a vowel sound,

  • we use the voiced D or the .../d/... pronunciation for ED

  • play ends in a AY sound

  • so play becomes played

  • free becomes freed, try becomes tried,

  • follow becomes followed, continue becomes continued

  • So let's look at some example sentences.

  • Listen to the pronunciation of the words ending in ED.

  • I waited for two hours.

  • She kissed her baby.

  • It rained last night.

  • Now, if you said /rain-t/ instead of /rain-d/

  • people will understand you

  • if you pronounce it with a /t/ ending instead of a /d/ ending.

  • But if you say /rain-id/ with 2 syllables instead of /rain-d/ with one syllable,

  • then people will normally NOT understand you

  • It seems like a small insignificant thing

  • but it is the difference between people understanding you

  • or people having no idea what you're saying.

  • So remember it's important that the .../id/... sound with the extra syllable

  • is only after words ending in T or D

  • I hope this lesson helped you

  • If you enjoyed this video, remember to click the Like button down the bottom

  • and share with your friends.

  • Have an awesome day!

Hi, I'm Rob and welcome to another Woodward English video.

字幕と単語

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

B1 中級

英語でのEDの発音 - EDの語尾の発音方法 (ED pronunciation in English - How to pronounce ED endings)

  • 117 16
    YANG に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語