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  • Hi there. My name is Emma and in today's video we will be looking at the IELTS, which is

  • a test that ESL students take when they want to immigrate to certain countries such as

  • Canada, Australia, England. It's also a test some universities require students take. So

  • if you want to study at an overseas university, you may have to take this test. So we will

  • be looking at specifically the speaking section of this test, part three. So the speaking

  • task has three different parts to it; part one, part two, part three. We will be looking

  • at part three. Okay, so first I will explain what happens in part three of the IELTS speaking

  • test, and then I will look at some tips on how to do well, and also things you should

  • not do. So let's get started. First of all, it's important

  • to know how long this test, this part of the test will take. It takes between four to five

  • minutes. Okay? And it's different than part two. In part two, the student is expected

  • to speak for about two minutes and there's no interruption. In this part of the IELTS,

  • it's more like an interview. The examiner asks you some sort of question, you respond.

  • They ask you another question or they might ask you to go deeper into the first question.

  • Okay? What types of questions are there? Well, sometimes

  • they'll ask you to predict something, to analyze something, to compare. They might ask you

  • to give your opinion. Often times, you're looking at the future as well. So for example:

  • what sports do you think will be played in the future? Okay? So often --future questions.

  • Part three is based on a theme. In part two, you're given something to describe often -- it

  • might be a historical building, it might be a teacher you really liked, it might be an

  • object precious to you. Part three continues from part two, so whatever you talked about

  • in part two, you're going to talk about in part three, but at a more abstract level.

  • So what do I mean by this? Well, if in part two you talked about your favourite teacher,

  • in part three you might be talking about education. You might talk about how it is different today

  • than it used to be. Okay? So you might be looking at education.

  • Some of the topics you may look at in part three: technology is very common, education,

  • environment, TV influence, leisure activities, shopping, sports, transportation. So these

  • are all very common topics, and so you'll be asked between four to six questions on

  • these types of topics. So an example you may be asked: "How are education

  • priorities different from those in the past?" Okay? So again, you have to state your opinion

  • for this question. All right, so let's look at some of the "Dos" and "Don'ts" for this

  • part of the IELTS. Okay, so let's look at some of the things

  • you should do. Okay? So there's our smiley face, this is a good idea. The first one is:

  • listen for keywords in the question. Okay? Sometimes you may not understand what the

  • question is... try to listen for the keywords of the question. Do you hear the word "education",

  • "school"? Listen and this will help you to understand the question better. If you still

  • don't understand the question: ask. Okay? This is very important. It's okay to ask the

  • examiner to repeat the question. If you don't understand, you can also ask for clarification.

  • It's better to ask if you don't understand than to answer something completely different

  • and wrong. Okay? So it's always better to ask.

  • When you do answer the question, make sure, again, you don't give these short yes/no answers.

  • Expand, give detail. Okay? Give examples, give reasons. It's very important to support

  • your points. For example: maybe they ask you if girls and boys should go to separate schools.

  • Okay? If you're asked that, you might say: "I think girls and boys should go to separate

  • schools for three reasons. First of all, girls learn better when they're separated from boys.

  • In my own experience, when I was a student, I was always distracted by boys." So you see

  • what I mean? Give details, give examples. Stick to the topic. This is very important.

  • If you're asked about education, talk about education. Don't talk about your pets, don't

  • talk about your hair; stick to education. I think this is actually the most important

  • point out of all of them: think you're... Think you will do well. What do I mean by

  • that? I think the IELTS isn't only testing you on your English, it's also testing you

  • psychologically. Okay? You need to think positively. You need to think you will do well. If you

  • think you will do well, you will definitely do better.

  • Okay, another point: it's important to build vocabulary before you do the IELTS. So you're

  • being marked on four things. You're being marked on pronunciation, you're being marked

  • on grammar, you're being marked on vocabulary, and you're being marked on fluency and coherence.

  • So that last one is together. So, these are the four different areas you're being marked

  • in. It's good if you focus partially on building your vocabulary beforehand; this is a good

  • way to prepare. You know you're going to be marked on this, so why not think about words

  • that have to do with technology? Practice these words in conversation. For example:

  • "technophobe", "cutting-edge", "state-of-the-art". All of these words will help you increase

  • your vocabulary score if you're asked about technology. Find words that have to do with

  • education, with leisure activities, transportation. So this is a very important thing to do as well.

  • Okay, another thing you should do: relate

  • the question you're asked to your own life. So if they ask you about technology, bring

  • examples of technology you use. Use examples of technologies you use, I mean. Use your

  • own experiences. And if you don't have a lot of experiences in terms of what they're asking

  • -- if they're talking about sports, you hate sports, you don't have anything to say about

  • sports -- again, you can make it up. Use your friend's experiences, use what you know from

  • the news. It's good to use real-life examples. Okay, this is another important point: it's

  • good to divide up your answer. Okay? So when they ask you a question, instead of just getting

  • right into it, you can say: "There are three ways that such and such works.", "There are

  • three problems with transportation in Toronto.", "There are several points I'd like to talk

  • about." Okay? So it's good to divide up what you're going to say by giving a number for

  • your answer. Another good thing to do is... This part of

  • the IELTS often requires you to use modals. So what are modals again? "Can", "could",

  • "may", "might", "should" -- these are modals. You're going to be using them in this part

  • of the IELTS. So brush up on that. Okay, practice using them. For example, maybe they're asking

  • you: "Who makes the best teachers?" You could say: "Parents may make the best teachers."

  • Okay? So use modals. Also learn opinion expressions. So don't just

  • keep saying: "I think", "I think", "I think". Use something else. "If you ask me", "In my

  • opinion", "It seems to me that", "It appears to me that", these are all good expressions

  • to use. "I think" is a little bit boring. Okay?

  • So now let's look at some of the "Don'ts", things you should not do for this part of

  • the IELTS. Okay, so what shouldn't you do in this section of the IELTS? Okay, so I have

  • "Don'ts" and an angry face. This is what you should not do.

  • So first of all, don't memorize answers. This is not the way to do well on the IELTS. Okay?

  • If you memorize answers, and if the examiner notices that you're sort of speaking funny

  • and thinks you've memorized an answer, they're going to change the subject. So it's good

  • not to memorize answers because you'll probably have a lot more difficulty if you do. It's

  • better, again, to spend your time learning vocabulary, practicing speaking with your

  • friends, practicing answering these types of questions, giving your opinion, but don't

  • memorize answers. Don't worry if you make mistakes. Okay? If

  • you make a mistake, if you can correct it and it won't take a lot of time - just quickly

  • correct it. If it's one of those mistakes that if you try to correct it, it's going

  • to cause a lot of problems, confusion - just leave it. It's okay if you make mistakes,

  • just keep going. Okay? Don't go off topic. So if you're talking about

  • education, don't start talking about sports. Stick to what they're asking you. Don't change

  • the question either; if they ask you a question, answer that question.

  • Don't use too many "umms" and "ahhs". Okay? Some "umms" and "ahhs" are okay, but if every

  • question you're saying: "Umm, I think, uhh, ehh that umm, uhh really that uhh", it's not

  • going to get you a good mark. So if you're one of those people who use "umms" and "ahhs"

  • a lot, try to focus before the IELTS on using them less. What you can always do is tape

  • record yourself speaking -- this is something I really recommend for the IELTS -- tape record

  • yourself, listen to your strengths: what are you good at? And what are your weaknesses?

  • Be honest -- everyone has weaknesses. So listen and try to practice beforehand to fix those

  • weaknesses. Okay? Don't use "I think" too much. "I think" gets

  • very boring. This is another thing ESL students often love

  • to do: they want to get more time and have more time to think of an answer so they use

  • these types of sentences in order to give themselves more time, they might say: "Oh,

  • that's a good question." It's okay to say that, but don't say it for every question.

  • Okay? If you need to buy that much time, don't just keep saying: "Oh, that's a good question.

  • Yeah, that's an interesting question. That's a good question." It's not going to help your

  • mark. If you use that, use it once. Okay, don't worry if you have an accent.

  • We all have accents. It's okay if you have an accent. In terms of your pronunciation mark,

  • the main thing they're looking for is that you speak clearly and they can understand

  • what you're saying. Okay? Oh, I think I said this twice, yes. So this

  • is a very important point; I've wrote it here twice. Don't worry if you make mistakes. Okay?

  • Treat this almost like a conversation. You know, it's good to support what you're saying,

  • it's good to make clear arguments. And so don't get too worried about this section of

  • the IELTS. Practice is the most important thing. Practice giving your opinion to your

  • friends, to your family, to anyone who will listen to you. Practice in English.

  • And if you want to see some of the questions you may get, come visit www.goodluckielts.com.

  • This site is wonderful, it has many good tips on how to do well on the IELTS and it also

  • has good practice questions. So maybe do some of those practice questions, and tape record

  • yourself while you do them. Okay? Another thing you can do is you can come visit

  • us at www.engvid.com. We will have a quiz there that will check to make sure you know

  • how to do your best on the IELTS. Okay, so until next time, good luck on the IELTS. I

  • know you're going to do great. Just practice, take a deep breath, and you're going to do

  • fine. So take care, and until next time.

Hi there. My name is Emma and in today's video we will be looking at the IELTS, which is

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A2 初級

IELTS Speaking Task 3 - 高得点を取る方法 (IELTS Speaking Task 3 - How to get a high score)

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    黃湘 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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