Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Good afternoon. As you are all aware, we face difficult economic times.

    こんにちは皆さんもご存知のように 厳しい経済状況に直面しています

  • I come to you with a modest proposal for easing the financial burden.

    財政負担を軽減するためのささやかな提案をしに来ました。

  • This idea came to me while talking to a physicist friend of mine at MIT.

    このアイデアは、MITの物理学者の友人と話しているときに思いつきました。

  • He was struggling to explain something to me.

    彼は私に何かを説明するのに苦労していました。

  • A beautiful experiment, that uses lasers to cool down matter.

    レーザーを使って物質を冷やすという美しい実験です。

  • He confused me from the very start,

    彼は最初から私を混乱させた

  • because light does not cool things down.

    なぜなら、光は物を冷やさないからです。

  • It makes it hotter. It is happening right now.

    暑くなります。 今まさに起きていることです。

  • The reason that you can see me standing here

    ここに立っている私を見ることができるのは

  • is because this room is filled with more than one hundered quintillion photons.

    この部屋には5億分の1以上の光子が 充満しているからです。

  • And they are moving randomly through the space, near the speed of light.

    そして、光の速さに近い空間をランダムに移動している。

  • All of them are different colours.

    どれも色が違います。

  • They are rippling with different frequencies.

    周波数を変えて波打っています。

  • And they are bouncing off every surface, including me.

    そして、彼らは私を含め、あらゆる表面を跳ね返している。

  • Some of those are flying directly into your eyes,

    中には直接目に飛び込んでくるものもあります。

  • and that is why your brain is forming an image of me standing here.

    だからあなたの脳は私がここに立っているイメージを形成しているのよ

  • Now, laser is different.

    さて、レーザーは違います。

  • It also uses photons,

    また、光子を利用しています。

  • but they are all synchronized.

    が、すべて同期しています。

  • If you focus them into a beam

    ビームに集中させれば

  • what you have is an incredibly useful tool!

    あなたが持っているものは、信じられないほど便利なツールです

  • The control of the laser is so precise,

    レーザーの制御がとても正確です。

  • that you can peform surgery inside of an eye.

    目の中の手術をすることができます。

  • You can use it to store massive amounts of data,

    大量のデータを保存するのに使えます。

  • and you can use it for this beautiful experiment,

    と、この美しい実験に使うことができます。

  • that my friend was struggling to explain.

    と、友人が説明するのに苦労していました。

  • First, you trap atoms in a special bottle, that uses electromagnetic fields

    まず、特別なボトルに原子を閉じ込め、電磁場を使って

  • to isolate the atoms from the noise of the environment.

    環境のノイズから原子を分離するために

  • And the atoms themselves are quite violent,

    そして、原子自体がかなり凶暴です。

  • but if you fire lasers

    レーザーを撃てば

  • that are precisely tuned to the right frequency,

    正確に正しい周波数にチューニングされています。

  • an atom will briefly absorb those photons and tend to slow down.

    原子はそれらの光子を一時的に吸収し、減速する傾向があります。

  • Little by little it gets colder until eventually it approaches absolute zero.

    少しずつ寒くなり、最終的には絶対零度に近づく。

  • Now, if you use the right kind of atoms and you get them cold enough,

    さて、原子の種類を正しく使って、十分に冷やすことができれば

  • something truly bizarre happens.

    本当に奇妙なことが起こる

  • It's no longer a solid, a liquid or a gas,

    もはや固体でも液体でも気体でもない。

  • it enters a new state of matter, called a superfluid.

    それは超流動体と呼ばれる新しい物質の状態に入ります。

  • The atoms lose their individual identity,

    原子は個々のアイデンティティを失う。

  • and the rules from the quantum world take over.

    と量子世界からのルールが引き継がれます。

  • And that's what gives superfluid such spooky properties.

    それが超流動体に不気味な性質を与えているのです。

  • For example, if you shine light through a superfluid,

    例えば、超流動体に光を当てるとします。

  • it is able to slow photons down to 60 km/h.

    それは光子を時速60kmまで遅くすることができます。

  • Another spooky property is that it flows with absolutely no viscosity or friction,

    もう一つの不気味な性質は、粘性や摩擦が全くない状態で流れるということです。

  • so if you were to take the lid of that bottle it won't stay inside.

    だから、あなたがそのボトルの蓋を取っていた場合は、それが中にとどまることはありません。

  • A thin film will creep up the inside wall, flow over the top

    薄い膜が内側の壁を這い上がり、上に流れていきます。

  • and right out to the outside.

    外側に出て

  • Now, of course, at the moment that it does at the outside environment

    今はもちろん、外部環境で行う瞬間に

  • and its temperature rises by even a fraction of a degree,

    と、その温度がほんのわずかでも上昇します。

  • it immediately turns back into normal matter.

    すぐに普通の物質に戻ってしまいます。

  • Superfluids are one of the most fragile things we've ever discovered.

    超流動体は、私たちがこれまでに発見した中で最も壊れやすいものの一つです。

  • And this is the great pleasure of science,

    そして、これが科学の大いなる楽しみです。

  • the defeat of our intuition through experimentation.

    実験による直感の敗北

  • But the experiment is not the end of the story,

    しかし、実験をして終わりではありません。

  • because you still have to transmit that knowlege to other people.

    なぜなら、その知識を他の人に伝えなければならないからです。

  • I have a PhD in Molecular Biology.

    私は分子生物学の博士号を持っています。

  • I still barely understand what most scientists are talking about.

    ほとんどの科学者が何を言っているのか、まだほとんど理解できていません。

  • So, as my friend was trying to explain that experiment,

    それで、友人がその実験を説明しようとしていたので

  • it seemed like, the more he said, the less I understood.

    彼が言えば言うほど 理解できなくなっていくように思えた

  • Because, if you're trying to give someone the big picture of a complex idea,

    なぜなら、もしあなたが複雑な考えの全体像を誰かに伝えようとしているのであれば。

  • to really capture its essence, the fewer words you'd use, the better.

    その本質を捉えようとするならば、使う言葉は少ない方が良いでしょう。

  • In fact the ideal may be to use no words at all.

    実際には全く言葉を使わないのが理想かもしれません。

  • I remember thinking

    と思ったのを覚えています。

  • "My friend could have explained that entire experiment with a dance."

    "My friend could have explained that entire experiment with a dance.&quot.

  • Of course, there never seem to be any dancers around when you need them.

    もちろん、必要な時にダンサーがいるようには見えません。

  • Now, the idea is not as crazy as it sounds.

    今は、その発想が狂っているというほどではありません。

  • I started a contest four years ago called "Dance Your PhD".

    私は4年前に"Dance Your PhD"と呼ばれるコンテストを始めました。

  • Instead of explaining the research with words, scientists have to explain it with dance.

    研究を言葉で説明するのではなく、科学者はダンスで説明しなければならない。

  • Suprisingly, it seems to work.

    意外にも、うまくいくようです。

  • Dance really can make science easier to understand.

    ダンスは本当に理科をわかりやすくしてくれます。

  • But don't take my word for it.

    しかし、私の言葉を鵜呑みにしないでください。

  • Go on the internet and search for "Dance Your PhD".

    インターネットで検索して、"Dance Your PhD"に移動します。

  • There are hundreds of dancing scientists waiting for you.

    何百人もの科学者が待っています。

  • The most suprising thing that I 've learnt while running the contest,

    コンテストを運営している間に学んだ最も驚くべきこと。

  • is that some scientists are now working directly with dancers on their research.

    科学者の中には、今ではダンサーと直接研究をしている人もいます。

  • For example, at the University of Minnesota there is a biomedical engineer

    例えば、ミネソタ大学にはバイオメディカルエンジニアがいて

  • named David Odde, and he works with dancers to study how cells move.

    ダンサーと一緒に活動し、細胞の動きを研究しています。

  • They do it by changing their shape.

    彼らは形を変えることでそれをしています。

  • When a chemical signal washes up on one side

    化学的な信号が片側に洗い流された場合

  • it triggers the cell to expand its shape on that side,

    それは、セルがその側でその形状を拡大することをトリガーにしています。

  • because the cell is constantly touching and tugging at the environment.

    なぜなら、細胞は常に環境に触れ、引っ張られているからです。

  • So, that allows cells to ooze along in the right directions.

    そうすることで、細胞が正しい方向に沿ってにじみ出ることができるのです。

  • But what seems so slow and graceful from the outside is really more like chaos inside.

    しかし、外見からはゆっくりと優雅に見えるものが、実は内部では混沌としているのです。

  • Because cells control their shape with a skeleton of rigid protein fibres.

    なぜなら、細胞は硬いタンパク質繊維の骨格で形をコントロールしているからです。

  • And those fibres are constantly falling apart.

    そして、それらの繊維は常にバラバラになっています。

  • But just as quickly as they explode, more proteins attach to their ends and grow them longer.

    しかし、爆発するのと同じように、より多くのタンパク質が末端に付着し、それを長く成長させます。

  • So it's constanlty changing, just to remain exactly the same.

    だから、それは全く同じままであるために、それはconstanlty変化しています。

  • David builds mathematical models of this, and then he tests those in a lab,

    デイビッドはこれの数学モデルを作って研究室でテストしています

  • but before he does that, he works with dancers to figure out

    でも、その前にダンサーと協力して

  • what kinds of models to build in the first place.

    そもそもどんなモデルを作ればいいのか

  • It is basically efficient brainstorming.

    基本的には効率的なブレーンストーミングです。

  • And when I visited David to learn about his research,

    そして、彼の研究を知るためにデビッドを訪れたとき。

  • he used dancers to explain it to me rather than the usual method, PowerPoint.

    彼は通常の方法ではなく、ダンサーを使って説明してくれました。

  • And this brings me to my modest proposal.

    そして、これが私のささやかな提案です。

  • I think that bad PowerPoint presentations are a serious threat to the global economy.

    私は、悪いPowerPointプレゼンテーションは、世界経済への深刻な脅威であると思います。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • It does depend on how you measure it, of course,

    もちろん測り方にもよりますが。

  • but one estimate has put the drain at 250 million dollars per day.

    しかし、ある試算では、1日あたり2億5000万ドルの排水量になっています。

  • Now that assumes half hour presentation for an average audience of four people

    今、それは4人の平均的な聴衆のための30分のプレゼンテーションを想定しています。

  • with salaries of 35.000 dollars.

    35.000ドルの給料で

  • And it conservatively assumes that about a quarter of the presentations are complete waste of time.

    そして、プレゼンテーションの約4分の1は完全な時間の無駄であると保守的に仮定しています。

  • And given that, there are some, apparently, 30 million PowerPoint presentations

    そして、それを考えると、いくつかの、明らかに、3000万人のPowerPointプレゼンテーションがあります。

  • created every day, that would indeed add up to an annual waste of a hundred billion dollars.

    毎日のように作られたものは、年間1000億ドルの無駄遣いにもなります。

  • Of course that's just the time we're losing sitting through presentations.

    もちろん、プレゼンテーションのために座っているだけでは時間が足りません。

  • There are other costs.

    他にも費用がかかります。

  • Because PowerPoint is a tool, and like any tool, it can and will be abused.

    PowerPointはツールであり、他のツールと同じように、それは悪用されることができますし、そうなるでしょう。

  • To borrow a concept from my country's CIA,

    私の国のCIAの概念を借りると

  • it helps you to soften up your audience,

    聴衆を柔らかくするのに役立ちます。

  • it distracts them with pretty pictures, irrelevant data.

    綺麗な写真や無関係なデータで気が散ってしまう。

  • It allows you to create the illusion of competence,

    能力があるかのような錯覚を起こすことができます。

  • the illusion of simplicity, and most destructively,

    シンプルさの錯覚、そして最も破壊的に。

  • the illusion of understanding.

    理解の錯覚

  • So now my country is 15 trillion dollars in debt.

    だから今、私の国は15兆ドルの借金を抱えている。

  • Our leaders are working tirelessly to try and find ways to save money.

    私たちのリーダーたちは、お金を節約する方法を見つけようと、たゆまぬ努力をしています。

  • One idea is to drastically reduce public support for the Arts.

    ひとつのアイデアは、芸術に対する国民の支持を激減させることです。

  • For example, our National Endowment for the Arts, with its 150 million dollar budget.

    例えば、1億5千万ドルの予算を持つ芸術のための国立基金。

  • Slashing that programme would immediately reduce the national debt by about 0.011%.

    このプログラムを削減すれば、すぐに国の債務は約0.011%削減される。

  • One certainly cannot argue with those numbers.

    確かにその数字には反論できません。

  • However, once we eliminate public funding for the Arts, there will be some drawbacks.

    しかし、芸術への公的資金をなくしてしまえば、欠点も出てくるでしょう。

  • The artists on the street will swell the ranks of the unemployed.

    路上のアーティストが失業者のランクを膨らませる。

  • Many will turn to drug abuse and prostitution,

    多くの人が薬物乱用や売春に手を染めるだろう。

  • and that will inevitably lower propery values in urban neighbourhoods.

    そして、それは必然的に都市部の近隣地域の適正値を下げることになります。

  • All of this could wipe out the savings we are hoping to make in the first place.

    これで、そもそも期待していた貯金が全て帳消しになってしまう可能性があります。

  • I shall now therefore humbly propose my own thoughts,

    そこで、私は謙虚に自分の考えを提案したいと思います。

  • which I hope will not be liable to the least objection.

    少しでも異論がないことを願っています。

  • Once we eliminate public funding for the artists, let's put them back to work,

    芸術家の公的資金をなくしたら、彼らを仕事に戻そう。

  • by using them instead of PowerPoint.

    PowerPointの代わりにそれらを使用することによって。

  • As a test case, I propose we start with American dancers.

    テストケースとして、アメリカのダンサーから始めることを提案します。

  • After all, they are the most perishable of their kind,

    何と言っても、彼らは彼らの中でも最も生鮮的な存在です。

  • prone to injury and very slow to heal due to our health care system.

    怪我をしやすく、健康管理体制が整っているため治りが非常に遅い。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Rather than dancing our PhDs,

    私たちの博士号を踊るよりも

  • we should use dance to explain all of our complex problems.

    複雑な問題をすべてダンスで説明するべきです。

  • Imagine our politicians using dance to explain why we must invade a foreign country,

    政治家がダンスを使って外国を侵略しなければならない理由を説明するのを想像してみてください。

  • or bail out an investment bank.

    または投資銀行を救済する。

  • It'd sure help.

    それは確かに助けになります。

  • Of course some day, in the deep future, a technology of persuasion,

    もちろん、いつかの深い未来には、説得の技術がある。

  • even more powerful than PowerPoint may be invented,

    パワーポイントよりもさらに強力なものが発明されるかもしれません。

  • rendering dancers unnecessary as tools of rhetoric.

    ダンサーをレトリックの道具として不要にする。

  • However, I trust that by that day,

    しかし、私はその日までに、そのことを信じています。

  • we shall have passed this present financial calamity.

    私たちは、この財政難を乗り越えなければなりません。

  • Perhaps by then, we will be able to afford the luxury of just sitting in an audience,

    おそらくその頃には、ただ観客席に座っているだけの余裕ができるようになっているのではないでしょうか。

  • with no other purpose than to witness the human form in motion.

    人間の形が動いているのを目撃すること以外の目的はありません。

  • (Music)

    音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

Good afternoon. As you are all aware, we face difficult economic times.

こんにちは皆さんもご存知のように 厳しい経済状況に直面しています

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 音楽 ダンサー 原子 プレゼンテーション 光子 流動

TEDx】John Bohannon & Black Label Movement - Dance Your PhD

  • 1185 39
    李應振 に公開 2020 年 08 月 06 日
動画の中の単語