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  • - [Alison] Hello everybody, and welcome to "Marketing Your New Online Store."

  • If you're just launching your online storefront, I'm sure you're chomping at

  • the bit to start making sales, and we're going to talk about the various ways you

  • can use digital marketing to do just that. In today's webinar, we'll start by meeting

  • our digital marketing experts. Then we'll quickly go over each marketing channel so

  • you'll have a foundational understanding of what we mean when we refer to things

  • like SEO, PPC feeds, and then each specialist will share tips for using each

  • channel effectively. And last but not least, we'll answer your questions. So go

  • ahead and start typing those questions into the Q&A box in the webinar software.

  • We're going to have a lengthy Q&A at the end of the webinar, but we might get a

  • chance to answer some questions during the presentation as well.

  • So let's start by meeting the webinar team. Hello again, my name is Alison,

  • and I'm going to moderate today's webinar. I'm a Search Marketing Manager here at

  • Volusion, and I'm passionate about strategy, content, and helping small

  • to medium businesses outwit larger corporations. I'm originally from Central

  • California, but I've been in Texas for over eight years now and started

  • spontaneously saying "ya'll" a few years ago. So it's a done deal, I'm a Texan.

  • - [Sean] It wasn't spontaneous at all. It's been a long time coming. Howdy,

  • everybody. My name is Sean, and I'm the Paid Search Specialist for today.

  • I've been at Volusion for four years. I've worked specifically with shopping feeds

  • and product listing ads for the last two. I'm certified in all things Google,

  • AdWords, Analytics, and Shopping. And I'm a big fan about using

  • data-driven marketing automation strategies to help online businesses.

  • When I'm not behind my two monitors at work, I'll be out hiking

  • around in the greenbelts here in Austin, Texas.

  • - [Kavi] Hey, I'm Kavi. I'm one of the SEO Specialists here at Volusion.

  • My background is actually in publishing, but a few years ago, I took my writing

  • skills and turned those plus my love of data into a career in digital marketing.

  • And yes, you are reading that last bullet point correctly.

  • I've never seen "Jaws," "The Shining," or "Groundhog Day."

  • - [Samantha] And I'm Samantha. I am an SEO Specialist and one of the resident social

  • media gurus here at Volusion. I recently just moved to Texas from Long Island,

  • New York, and I have about four years working in social media, SEO,

  • and marketing. I've had experience dealing with clients in a multitude industries

  • from fashion to industrial fasteners. Oh, and a fun fact, I hate cilantro.

  • Apparently, they say it's a genetic thing.

  • - [Alison] Interesting. All right. So now that we've met our team of experts,

  • let's talk about the different marketing channels. We can start with the text ads

  • that often appear on the right-hand side and on the top of search results.

  • - [Sean] Alison, that's going to be me. So pay-per-click ads are going to be those

  • hyperlinked text ads that appears at the top or the side of search result pages,

  • as you can see in the highlighted box to the right here. These ads are the most

  • ubiquitous of the web, and if you haven't clicked on them, you've definitely seen

  • them before. These are going to be really short ads with only two lines of text and

  • use targeted keywords to drive really qualified traffic to your store. Keywords

  • are words and phrases that match your ads to the terms people are searching for.

  • And from this example, you'll see that we're searching for telescopes, and the ad

  • experience matches that. You're only going to be paying for ads when someone clicks

  • onto it and visits your website, rather than just having to pay a set rate.

  • And lastly, PPC is a great marketing technique to oust your competition quickly

  • because your ads can very quickly appear on the front page.

  • - [Kavi] All right. And SEO stands for search engine optimization. It's a set of

  • strategies that can affect the organic or unpaid results that make up the majority

  • of your average search results page. You can see where those organic results begin

  • for our telescope example here inside this green box. So unlike PPC or shopping

  • feeds, SEO is a slow and steady process. Results don't happen overnight.

  • Best practices are always changing. But when results do appear, they can provide

  • a lasting value long after you've started your SEO campaign. So by performing a few

  • technical changes to your website and featuring fresh, compelling content on

  • your landing pages, you can help the search engines recognize what each page is

  • about and why it should be considered worthy of appearing in the search results.

  • One thing to keep in mind, this is a common misconception that a lot of people

  • have starting out with SEO. SEO is not about tricking or gaming the search

  • engines into ranking your site higher than a competitor's. It's about

  • working along with the search engines' sophisticated algorithms to increase

  • your site's traffic and revenue.

  • - [Sean] Excellent. Moving away from organic and back to paid search for just a

  • moment, shopping feeds, or data feeds as I'll be calling them, are image-based ads

  • that appear at the top or right-hand side of the search result pages. Because they

  • have an image, they can really stand out, especially on mobile devices, and do a

  • great job of showing off your products. These ads are pretty simple and only

  • provide the product image, the product title, its price, and your domain name.

  • PPC, the text ads we just saw, can advertise services or locations, like

  • plumbers in your areas or restaurants nearby. Shopping feeds are a little bit

  • different because they're going to be an ecommerce-first type of advertising. That

  • means they can only show products. Lastly, these ads are not keyword based like PPC,

  • so you don't have to research any keywords or do much extra work.

  • Instead, your ads are going to be served to clients based on Google

  • matching your products with search terms.

  • - [Samantha] The last marketing tool we're going to be discussing is social media.

  • And social media doesn't have its own place in the search results, but it

  • definitely has a special place in the consumer's heart. The whole idea of social

  • media is to make your customers love you by showing them how valuable they are.

  • This mutual respect fosters trust between the customer and the brand, which is why

  • about 81% of small businesses use social media. When you're a small business,

  • customer relations and business reputation on social media are very important.

  • In fact, shoppers are more likely to make a purchase after reading something

  • they saw on social media. So you want to make sure that you're representing

  • yourself well. When it comes down to it, social media is an avenue for promotion,

  • but it's also an effective customer service tool and a great way for brands

  • to get noticed. It does not discriminate by the size of your business.

  • Small and large brands both have a chance for success on social media.

  • Oh, and as a bonus, it allows you to direct people to your online store.

  • - [Alison] Excellent. All right. So let's talk about the strategies and tactics you

  • can use today to start marketing your online store. We've broken each channel

  • into three parts: Overview, Tips, and Takeaways. We'll also be providing you

  • with some resources. But before we do just that, I want to give

  • you some homework for tonight. If you do one thing today, please install Google

  • Analytics on your store. This way you can begin gathering data immediately and track

  • your store's performance over time. Volusion offers some easy do-it-yourself

  • instructions linked here, and the Volusion Tech Support Team can certainly assist you

  • with this. But trust me, it's literally copy and pasting. So you can do it,

  • and it's free. But if this is too intimidating, we also offer an

  • implementation service. But again, it's copy and pasting. It's free. I promise

  • you, you can do it on your own, which is great, because the data Google Analytics

  • provides is priceless. You'll learn everything from visitor demographics

  • and behavior to which channels are driving your traffic and conversions. So you'll

  • want to monitor your traffic data over time so you can make informed marketing

  • decisions in the future. We recommend that you explore Analytics in bite-size pieces

  • just to avoid being overwhelmed. There are a bunch of wonderful free tools out there

  • to help you learn the ropes. I recommend starting with this Metrics Webinar and

  • Google's free training resources. All of these links are not clickable now, but

  • they will be when we send you out the slideshow after the webinar concludes.

  • All right. So let's get to why you're really here. Marketing your store and

  • driving sales. We're going to start with pay-per-click, also known as PPC.

  • - [Sean] Excellent. Thanks Alison. As mentioned earlier, if you're a new store

  • just getting started or even an older, established store, PPC is a cornerstone to

  • any marketing strategy. Getting started with pay-per-click advertising can seem a

  • bit daunting, but it's really not too much to it. You're going to begin the

  • process by creating a campaign and then subdivide that campaign into

  • something called ad groups. Many of you may already be familiar with

  • AdWords and kind of know this, but ad groups are the subdivision where you

  • actually create the ads, add in your two witty lines of text as well as your call

  • to action. This is also where you're going to be setting your keywords. PPC is going

  • to be great to bring highly qualified traffic, and a reason for that is just how

  • flexible that it is. These ad types can change very quickly to accommodate store

  • changes, like a flash sale, as well as for seasons and holidays like Black Friday or

  • the Christmas shopping season. There really is a ton of flexibility of what you

  • can do. You can raise and lower daily budgets with a few clicks, test new ad

  • text, and add in new keywords. PPC is going to be great for marketing new

  • stores. You can direct the customer to any part of your store. And this means that

  • the landing page, the first page that the customer sees after clicking your ad can

  • be the homepage, an article, a category, or even a product page, anywhere on your

  • site. There will, of course, be better places to send them than not, so you can

  • try out a lot of different things and test a lot. So focus on popular categories and

  • higher margin products, it's always a great place to start. Lastly, it's going

  • to be great for gathering quality data about your store's traffic. Because the

  • data is tangible and quick, you can make a lot of great decisions that contribute as

  • you continue to build your store. So let's go ahead and consider some tips

  • to get started. First, you're going to want to make sure that your store is

  • presentable. Take your customers to an attractive and functional website.

  • Of course, it doesn't have to be perfect, and you're never going to be truly

  • finished building your store. But you still want your new customers to have a

  • really good experience when they get there. Second, you really want to organize

  • your categories and subcategories well. Think about your online store like a

  • real store. Different aisles or different categories and different shelves are the

  • different subcategories. So you're going to want to separate your products in

  • an appropriate way. If you sell apparel, you want to separate that from your sports

  • equipment and gear. If you have men's and women's lines of clothes, make sure that

  • they are not all jumbled together. For an example, let's look at considering

  • gift baskets. If you sell gift baskets, this would be your aisle, and the

  • different types -- baby gift baskets, movie gift baskets -- would be their own

  • subcategories and their own shelves. For PPC, if someone is searching for wedding

  • gift baskets, you want to show them products specific to that search.

  • It's going to be more qualified and they're likely to enjoy the

  • experience a little bit better. The third tip about PPC is try to keep

  • your CPCs, your cost-per-click bids, as low as you can while still getting the

  • traffic that you want. If you're just getting started, a rookie mistake that I

  • see far too often is that you're going to be overpaying for traffic because you want

  • people to get in the door. Instead, try to slow it down and focus on building a

  • sustainable and successful campaign. With this, experiment with ad position.

  • It doesn't always really pay, nudge, nudge, to be in the first spot. You're

  • going to want to see a good ROI, a return on investment, at a lower spot without

  • spending as much. So just don't overspend when you don't have to. And with that, try

  • to be more specific than too broad. You don't necessarily want anyone coming to

  • your store. I know it may seem like that. But instead, you're trying to advertise to

  • people who are looking to buy your specific products. PPC doesn't take a

  • shotgun approach to getting people into the door. A way to avoid the shotgun

  • approach is to add negative keywords into your account. Negative keywords are the

  • complete opposite of keywords. They are words and phrases that you don't want to

  • show up for. Common examples include the words "cheap," "used," or places like

  • "Craigslist" and "Walmart. " These people who are searching for "gift basket

  • Walmart" already have a destination in mind, and you don't want to pay for clicks

  • along the way when someone may just be searching and browsing around.

  • As a final takeaway, I want to say that PPC is going to be a great way to meet a

  • new audience through compelling text ads. It brings really quality traffic to your

  • site very quickly. But before you start paying for traffic, remember to have your

  • site in its best form. Structure your categories and subcategories as best they

  • can be to align your products with your campaigns and your ad groups. And finally,

  • try to offer some stuff that's going to stand out from your competition.

  • Well, I've added just a few little resources for you as well when this slide

  • deck and webinar are made available after we wrap up. These few little hyperlinks

  • include the AdWords Keyword Planner that will help you get an idea of how much

  • you'll be paying for your keywords, as well as some new ones you can add to your

  • account. I've also included a list of a few blogs and webinars that we've done

  • here at Volusion and will give you ideas of how to start as well as one of my

  • favorite articles about PPC Strategies for Procrastinators. This article is about

  • getting started in the holiday season in, like, November, but the basic steps

  • provide you the ability to create a brief skeleton and the same type

  • of structure you'd be doing when you're just getting started.

  • So I definitely recommend that third link.

  • - [Alison] Awesome. Thank you, Sean. And just as a happy reminder, as questions

  • come up, you know, regarding PPC, SEO feeds, please send those on in.

  • No question is too basic. We'll tackle them all.

  • All right. So now, let's take a minute to transition from the paid side of things to

  • what we call the natural, or organic, search results. Kavi will give us

  • an overview of SEO strategies for getting your store featured

  • in Google's natural or organic search results.

  • - [Kavi] Okay. Thank you, Alison. SEO is a great search marketing tactic for

  • ecommerce stores in almost any industry. Search engine visibility is an absolute

  • must for getting brands discovered, and that's true whether you sell sundresses or

  • networking cables or anything in between. No matter what your site is about, you're

  • going to need some unique and relevant content to signal to your customers and

  • also to the search engines what you're selling and why it's great. Before

  • beginning an SEO overhaul, though, you do want to do some thinking about customer

  • behavior. Make sure your site looks and feels like a place where people want to

  • shop and actually make purchases, as Sean said before, because the search engines

  • can tell how much time visitors spend on your site and how often they just leave

  • the store without buying anything. So think about things like: Does your site

  • use a responsive template? Will customers have a good shopping experience if they're

  • on a desktop or a mobile platform? Those are important considerations for the

  • search engines, so they should be important to you as well. The way the

  • search engines treat your site and, as a result, your traffic and your revenue will

  • improve the more customers interact meaningfully with your online store.

  • In my opinion, the best thing about SEO is that it costs nothing but your time and

  • your brain power. When it's done right, it's a totally free way to improve your

  • presence in the search results and to attract new customers. SEO can definitely

  • be time-consuming, but the time and energy you spend is definitely worth the return.

  • I saw a recent digital marketing study that shows 88% of all shoppers do some

  • research online before making a purchase, even if that purchase ends up happening in

  • a brick-and-mortar store instead of online. So in order for potential

  • customers to discover your brand during that online research period, they have to

  • be able to find you using channels like Google Search. Think about the actual

  • phrases that your ideal customer is typing into Google. Think about what makes your