Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • I have been asked to talk to you today about an essay that I wrote for "The New York Times"

    今日はニューヨーク・タイムズ紙に書いた エッセイの話をしたいと頼まれました

  • last year which went under a rather dramatic heading.

    昨年はかなり劇的な見出しの下で行われました。

  • It was called, "Why you will marry the wrong person."

    "間違った人と結婚する理由 "と呼ばれていました。

  • And perhaps we can just begin -- we're among friends -- by just asking how many of you

    私たちは友人の間にいますが、あなた方の中には何人いるのかと聞いてみましょう。

  • in the room do feel on balance that you have married the wrong person?

    部屋の中では、あなたは間違った人と結婚したことをバランスよく感じていますか?

  • [ Laughter ] I mean, where are my friends?

    友達はどこにいるの?

  • Yeah, a lady there, a couple people there.

    女性が数人いたわ

  • Five, ten.

    5、10

  • I see 30 people in the room, and so we always have to triple that.

    30人も入っているのを見ているので、いつも3倍になってしまいます。

  • [ Laughter ] So there's a pretty hefty majority.

    かなりの多数派だな。

  • But I'm here to give counsel and to give consolation for this situation.

    しかし、私はこの状況を慰め、助言をするためにここにいます。

  • You know, there's a lot of anger around our love lives privately held.

    ラブライブを非公開にしていることに怒りの声が上がっていますが

  • But a lot of us go around feeling quite enraged, angry privately, about the way that our love

    しかし、私たちの多くは、私たちの愛がどのように行われているかについて、個人的に怒りを感じています。

  • lives have gone.

    人生が終わってしまった。

  • My task today is to turn that anger into sadness.

    今日の私の課題は、その怒りを悲しみに変えることです。

  • If we -- [ Laughter ]

    If we -- [ Laughter ]

  • If we manage to turn rage into grief, we will have made psychological progress.

    なんとか怒りを悲しみに変えることができれば、心理的な進歩があったことになります。

  • And this is the task today.

    そして、これが今日の課題です。

  • What lies behind rage very often is an unusual quality because we tend to think that very

    怒りの背後にあるものは、非常に多くの場合、私たちは非常に考える傾向があるので、異常な品質です。

  • angry people are sort of dark and pessimistic characters.

    怒っている人は、ある種暗くて悲観的なキャラクターです。

  • Absolutely not.

    絶対にダメだ

  • Scratch the surface of any regularly angry person and you will find a wild optimist.

    定期的に怒っている人の表面をスクラッチすると、野生の楽天家を見つけることができます。

  • It is, in fact, hope that drives rage.

    怒りを駆り立てるのは、実は希望なのです。

  • Think of the person who screams every time they can't find their house keys or every

    家の鍵が見つからないたびに悲鳴を上げる人のことを考えてみてください。

  • time they get stuck in traffic.

    渋滞に巻き込まれた時

  • These unfortunate characters are evincing a curious but reckless faith in a world in

    これらの不幸な登場人物たちは、好奇心旺盛だが無謀な信仰心を世界に呼び覚ましている。

  • which keys never go astray, the roads to mysteriously traffic-free.

    どのキーが迷子になることはありません、不思議なことに交通のない道。

  • It is hope that is turbo charging their rage.

    それはターボが彼らの怒りを充電していることを希望しています。

  • So if we are to get a little bit less sad and -- a little less angry about our love

    だから、もし私たちが少しだけ悲しみを減らして -- 私たちの愛について少しだけ怒りを減らすために

  • lives, we will have to diminish some of our hopes.

    生活をしていく上では、ある程度の希望を薄めていかなければならないでしょう。

  • It's very hard to diminish hope around love because there are vast industries designed

    膨大な産業が設計されているので、恋愛にまつわる希望が薄れてしまうのはとてもつらいことです。

  • to inflate our expectations of love.

    愛への期待を膨らませるために

  • There's a wonderful quote from the German philosopher Theodor Adorno who in the 1960s

    ドイツの哲学者テオドール・アドルノの素晴らしい言葉があります。

  • said the most dangerous man in America was Walt Disney.

    アメリカで最も危険な男はウォルト・ディズニーだと言っていました。

  • And the reason for his attack on Walt was because he believed that Walt was the prime

    そして、ウォルトを攻撃した理由は、ウォルトがプライムであると信じていたからです。

  • agent of hope and, therefore, of rage and, therefore, of bitterness.

    希望のエージェントであり、それゆえに怒りのエージェントであり、それゆえに恨みのエージェントでもある。

  • And he thought that it was the task of philosophy to let us down gently, which is what I'm going

    そして、私たちを優しく降ろしてくれるのが哲学の仕事だと考えていたのです。

  • to be doing today.

    今日のために

  • So remember the theme of the talk, "Why you will marry the wrong person."

    そこで今回のトークのテーマである "ダメな人と結婚する理由 "を思い出してみてください。

  • There are a number of reasons why this is going to happen to you or has maybe already

    これがあなたの身に起こるか、あるいはすでに起こっているかの理由はいくつかあります。

  • in the privacy of your heart happened to you.

    あなたの心の中では、あなたに何が起こったのでしょうか?

  • I should say that it's not that bad.

    と言うべきかと思います。

  • And the reason is that all of us will not manage to find the right person, but we will

    そして、なぜかというと、すべての人が、自分に合った人を見つけることには成功しませんが

  • probably all of us manage to find a good-enough person.

    おそらく、私たちは皆、十分に良い人を見つけることができます。

  • And that's success as you will come to see.

    そして、それはあなたが見ることができるようになる成功です。

  • [ Laughter ] One of the reasons why we are not going to

    私達が行かない理由の一つは

  • be able to pull this one hope as successfully as we might have hoped at the early -- at

    この一つの希望を成功させることができるかどうかは、私たちが初期の段階で期待していたかもしれません。

  • the outset of our teenage hurdle when we were contemplating love is that we are very strange.

    恋愛を熟考していた頃の10代のハードルの高さの発端は、私たちがとても不思議な存在であるということです。

  • I'm very strange, and you're very strange.

    私はとても不思議な存在で、あなたはとても不思議な存在です。

  • You don't let on.

    あなたはそれを許しません。

  • We're not going to do anything very dangerous, but we are basically psychologically quite

    あまり危険なことをするつもりはありませんが、基本的には心理的にかなり

  • strange.

    奇妙な

  • We don't normally know very much about this strangeness.

    この奇妙さについては、普段はあまり知らない。

  • It takes us a long, long time before we are really on top of the way in which we are hard

    私たちが本当に自分の硬さに気づくまでには、長い長い長い時間がかかります。

  • to live with.

    一緒に暮らすために。

  • Does anyone in this room think that they're quite easy to live with on balance?

    ここにいる人はバランス的にかなり生きやすいと思ってるのかな?

  • Yeah?

    そうなんですか?

  • Oh, my goodness.

    あーあ、いいなー。

  • Okay.

    いいわよ

  • I don't want to be rude, but please come see me afterwards.

    失礼かもしれませんが、終わってから会いに来てくださいね。

  • [ Laughter ] I know -- I know that you're not easy to live

    私は知っている、あなたは簡単には生きられないことを知っている。

  • with.

    と一緒に。

  • And the reason is that you're Homo sapiens and, therefore, you are not easy to live with.

    そして、ホモ・サピエンスであるがゆえに、生きづらいというのがその理由です。

  • No one is.

    誰もいない

  • But there's a wall of silence that surrounds us from a deeper acquaintance with what is

    しかし、何が何であるかをより深く知ることから、私たちを取り巻く沈黙の壁があります。

  • actually so difficult about us.

    実際には私たちのことでとても難しいです。

  • Our friends don't want to tell us.

    私たちの友人は、私たちに言いたくないのです。

  • Why would they bother?

    なぜ彼らは気にするのか?

  • They just want a pleasant evening out.

    彼らはただ楽しい夜の外出を望んでいるだけです。

  • Our friends know more about us and more about our flaws.

    私たちの友人は、私たちのことをもっと知っていて、私たちの欠点をもっと知っています。

  • Probably after ten minutes' acquaintance, a stranger will know more about your flaws

    ひとめぼれして知らぬ人のほうがあなたの欠点をよく知っているかもしれない

  • than you might learn over 40 years of life on the planet.

    地球上での40年以上の人生を学ぶよりも

  • Our capacity to intuit what is wrong with us is very weak.

    私たちの何が悪いのかを直感する能力は非常に弱い。

  • Our parents don't tell us very much.

    うちの親はあまり教えてくれません。

  • Why would they?

    なぜそんなことを?

  • They love us too much.

    彼らは私たちを愛しすぎています。

  • They know.

    彼らは知っている

  • They conceived.

    彼らは妊娠しました。

  • Of course, they followed us from the crib.

    もちろん、ベビーベッドからもついてきてくれました。

  • They know what's wrong with us.

    何が悪いのか分かっている

  • They're not going to tell us.

    彼らは私たちには言わないでしょう。

  • [ Laughter ] They just want to be sweet.

    彼らは甘くなりたいだけだ。

  • And our ex-lovers, a vital source of knowledge.

    そして、元恋人たちの重要な知識源。

  • They know.

    彼らは知っている

  • Absolutely they know.

    絶対に彼らは知っています。

  • [ Laugher ] But do you remember that speech that they

    あのスピーチを覚えているか?

  • gave?

    くれたのか?

  • It was moving at the time when they said that they wanted a little space and were attracted

    ちょっとしたスペースが欲しいと言っていた時に動いていて、惹かれたのは

  • to travel and were interested in the culture of southeast Asia.

    旅行に行きたくて、東南アジアの文化に興味を持っていました。

  • Nonsense.

    くだらない

  • They thought lots of things were wrong with but they weren't going to be bothered to tell

    いろんなことが悪いと思っていたけど、言われても困ると思っていた。

  • you.

    あなたのことです。

  • They were just out of there.

    彼らはちょうどそこから出ていました。

  • Why would they bother?

    なぜ彼らは気にするのか?

  • So this knowledge that is out there is not in you.

    だから、そこにあるこの知識は、あなたの中にはありません。

  • It's out there, but it's not in you.

    それはそこにあるが、あなたの中にはない。

  • And so, therefore, we progress through the world with a very -- a low sense of what is

    そのため、私たちは世界の中で、何が何であるかについて、非常に...低い感覚を持って進んでいます。

  • actually wrong with us.

    実際には間違っています。

  • Not least all of us are addicts.

    少なくとも全員が中毒者というわけではありません。

  • Almost all of us are addicts, not injecting heroin as such but addicts in the sense we

    私たちのほぼ全員が中毒者であり、ヘロインを注射するのではなく、私たちの意味での中毒者です。

  • need to redefine what addiction is.

    中毒とは何かを再定義する必要があります。

  • I like to define addiction not in terms of the substance you're taking.

    摂取している物質ではなく、依存症の定義が好きなんです。

  • In other words, I'm a heroin addict.

    つまり、ヘロイン中毒なんです。

  • I'm a cocaine addict.

    私はコカイン中毒者です。

  • No.

    駄目だ

  • Addiction is basically any pattern of behavior whereby you cannot stand to be with yourself

    中毒は基本的に自分と一緒にいることができないようにするための行動パターンです。

  • and sort of the more uncomfortable thoughts and, more importantly, emotions that come

    そして、より不快な考えや、より重要な感情のようなものが出てきます。

  • from being on your own.

    一人でいることから

  • And so, therefore, you can be addicted to almost anything so long as it keeps you away

    だから、それがあなたを遠ざけている限り、あなたはほとんど何にでもハマることができます。

  • from yourself, as long as it keeps you away from tricky self-knowledge.

    自分自身から、トリッキーな自己認識から遠ざかる限りは。

  • And most of us are addicts.

    そして、私たちのほとんどは中毒者です。

  • Thanks to all sorts of technologies and distractions, et cetera, we can have a good life where we

    技術や気晴らし、エトセトラのすべての種類のおかげで、私たちは私たちがどこで良い生活を送ることができます。

  • will almost certainly be guaranteed not to spend any time with ourselves except maybe

    はほぼ確実に自分自身との時間を過ごさないことが保証されています。

  • for certain kind of airlines still don't have the gadgets to distract us.

    特定の種類の航空会社のためにまだ私たちを気をそらすためにガジェットを持っていません。

  • But otherwise, you can be guaranteed you don't have to talk to yourself.

    でも、そうでなければ、独り言を言わなくてもいいことは保証されています。

  • And this is a disaster for your capacity to have a relationship with another person because

    そして、これはあなたが他人との関係を持つことができる能力のための災難です。

  • until you know yourself, you can't properly relate to another person.

    自分のことを知らないと、他人との関わり方がうまくできない。

  • One of the reasons why love is so tricky for us is that it requires us to do something

    恋愛が厄介な理由の一つは、何かをしなければならないからです。

  • we really don't want to do, which is to approach another human being and say "I need you.

    私たちが本当にしたくないことは、他の人間に近づいて「あなたが必要だ」と言うことです。

  • I wouldn't really survive without you.

    あなたがいなければ、私は本当に生き残れない。

  • I'm vulnerable before you."

    "私はあなたの前では弱っている"

  • And there's a very strong impasse in all of us to be strong and to be well-defended and

    そして、みんなの中には、強くなるための、しっかりとした防衛力と

  • not to reveal our vulnerability to another person.

    他人に自分の弱さを明かさないこと。

  • Psychologists talk of two patterns of response that tend to crop up in people whenever there

    心理学者は、いつでもそこにある人々に現れる傾向がある応答の2つのパターンの話をします。

  • is a danger of needing to be extremely vulnerable, dangerously vulnerable, and exposed to another

    は、非常に脆弱で危険な状態にあることを必要とし、他の人に晒される危険性がある

  • person.

    人の人になります。

  • The first response is to get what psychologists call anxiously attached.

    最初の反応は、心理学者が不安そうにくっついていると呼ぶものを手に入れることです。

  • Attachment theory, some of you may know.

    愛着理論、ご存知の方もいらっしゃるでしょう。

  • So when you are anxiously attached to somebody, rather than saying, "I need you,I depend on

    だから、誰かに執着しているときは、「あなたが必要だから、頼っている」というよりも、「あなたが必要だから、頼っている」と言ったほうがいいのです。

  • you," you start to get very procedural.

    "あなた "は、非常に手続き的になり始めます。

  • You say, "You are ten minutes late," or, "The bin bags need to be taken out."

    "10分遅れだ "とか "ゴミ袋を出してくれ "とか

  • Or you start to get strict when actually what you want to do is to ask a very poignant question:

    あるいは、実際に何をしたいのかというと、非常に痛烈な質問をすることです。

  • Do you still care about me?

    まだ私のこと気にしてるの?

  • But we don't dare to ask that question, so instead we get nasty.

    しかし、その質問をする勇気がないので、代わりに意地悪をしてしまう。

  • We get stiff.

    凝り固まってしまう。

  • We get procedural.

    手続き的なものを手に入れる。

  • The other thing -- the other pattern of behavior, which psychologists have identified -- and

    もう一つは--心理学者が特定した行動のもう一つのパターン--と

  • it tends to apply to people who are in this room, in other words, A types, very outgoing

    この部屋にいる人に当てはまる傾向があります。

  • types, strivers -- you become in relationships -- tell me if I'm wrong, you become what is

    タイプ、努力家、人間関係の中では、間違っていたら教えてください、あなたは何になるのですか?

  • known as avoidant, which means that when you need someone, it's precisely at that moment

    咄嗟に人が必要な時は咄嗟に避ける

  • that you pretend you don't.

    見て見ぬふりをしていると

  • When you feel more vulnerable, you say, "I'm quite busy at the moment.

    弱気になると、「今は結構忙しいんですよ。

  • I'm fine.

    私は大丈夫です。

  • Thanks.

    ありがとうございます。

  • I'm busy today."

    "今日は忙しい"

  • In other words, you don't reveal the need for another person, which sets them off into

    言い換えれば、あなたは他の人のための必要性を明らかにしない、それは彼らをオフに設定します。

  • a chain of wondering whether you are to be trusted.

    信用されるかどうかの連鎖。

  • And it's then a cycle of low trust.

    そして、それは低信頼のサイクルになってしまいます。

  • So we get into these patterns of not daring to do the thing that we really need to do,

    だから、本当にやるべきことをやる勇気がないというパターンに陥ってしまうのです。

  • which is to say even though I'm a grown person, maybe I have got a beard, maybe I have been

    というのは、大人になってもひげを生やしているかもしれないし、もしかしたら

  • alive for a long time, I'm 6'2", et cetera, I'm actually a small child inside and I need

    長い間生きていて、私は6フィート2インチ、エトセトラ、私は実際には小さな子供の中にあり、私は必要としています。

  • you like a small child would need its parent.

    小さな子供のようなあなたには親が必要です。

  • This is so humbling that most of us refuse to make that step and, therefore, refuse the

    これは、私たちのほとんどがその一歩を踏み出すことを拒否するほど謙虚であり、したがって

  • challenge of love.

    愛の挑戦

  • In short, we don't know very much how to love.

    要するに、恋愛の仕方をあまり知らないということです。

  • And it sounds very odd because imagine somebody said, look, all of us probably in this room

    そして、それは非常に奇妙に聞こえる 誰かが言ったことを想像してみてください、見て、私たちはおそらくこの部屋にいる全員が

  • would probably need to go to a school of love.

    恋愛の学校に行く必要があるのかもしれません。

  • We think, What?

    私たちは、何を考えていますか?

  • A school of love?

    恋愛の学校?

  • Love is just an instinct.

    恋愛は本能でしかない。

  • No, it's not.

    いや、そうじゃない。

  • It's a skill, and it's a skill that needs to be learned.

    スキルとして身につけておかなければならないものです。

  • And it's a skill that our society refuses to consider as a skill.

    そして、私たちの社会がスキルとして考えることを拒否しているのです。

  • We are meant to always just follow our feelings.

    私たちは常に自分の気持ちに従うことを意味しています。

  • If you keep following your feelings, you will almost certainly make a big mistake in your

    自分の気持ちを追い続けていると、ほぼ確実に自分の中で大きな失敗をすることになります。

  • life.

    の生活を送ることができます。

  • What is love?

    愛とは何か?

  • Ultimately love, I believe, is something -- first of all, there is a distinction between loving

    究極的には、愛は、私は信じて、何かである - まず第一に、愛することの区別がある

  • and being loved.

    と愛されています。

  • We all start off in life by knowing a lot about being loved.

    人は誰でも、愛されることをたくさん知ることから人生のスタートを切ります。

  • Being loved is the fun bit.

    愛されることは楽しいことです。

  • That's when somebody brings you something on a tray and asks you how your day at school

    誰かがトレイの上に何かを持ってきて学校での一日はどうだったかと聞くのよ

  • went, et cetera.

    行け、等々。

  • And we grow up thinking that that's what is going to happen in an adult relationship.

    そして、大人の関係ではそうなると思って育つのです。

  • We can be forgiven for that.

    それはそれで許せます。

  • It's an ununderstandable mistake, but it's a very tragic mistake.

    理解不能なミスではあるが、非常に悲惨なミスである。

  • And it leads us not to pay attention to the other side of the equation, which is to love.

    そして、それは、私たちを愛するという方程式の反対側に注意を払わないことにつながります。

  • What does it really mean "to love"?

    本当の意味での「愛すること」とは?

  • To love ultimately is to have the willingness to interpret someone's on the surface not

    最終的に愛するということは、表面上の解釈ではなく、人の解釈をしようとする意志を持つことです。

  • very appealing behavior in order to find more benevolent reasons why it may be unfolding.

    展開されるかもしれない理由をより多くの慈悲深い理由を見つけるために、非常に魅力的な行動。

  • In other words, to love someone is to apply charity and generosity of interpretation.

    言い換えれば、人を愛するということは、慈愛と寛大な解釈を適用することである。

  • Most of us are in dire need of love because actually we need to be -- we need to have

    私たちのほとんどは、実際に私たちがする必要があるため、愛の悲惨な必要性である - 私たちは持っている必要があります

  • some slack cut for us because our behavior is often so tricky that if we don't do this,

    私たちの行動は厄介なことが多いので、これをしなければ、私たちのためにいくつかの弛みをカットします。

  • we wouldn't get through any kind of relationship.

    どんな関係になっても、私たちは乗り切れません。

  • But we're not used to thinking that that is the core of what love is.

    でも、それが愛とは何かの核心だと考えるのには慣れていません。

  • Core of what love is, is the willingness to interpret another's behavior.

    愛とは何かの核心は、他の人の行動を解釈しようとする意志です。

  • What we tend to be very bad at is recognizing that anyone that we can love is going to be

    私たちが苦手としがちなのは、愛することができる人は誰でも

  • a perplexing mixture of the good and the bad.

    良いものと悪いものが入り混じった不可解なもの

  • There's a wonderful psychoanalyst called Melanie Klein, who was active in the '50s and '60s,

    メラニー・クラインという素晴らしい精神分析家がいて、50~60年代に活躍していました。

  • originally from Vienna, active in North London studying how children learned about relationships

    ウィーン出身で、ノースロンドンで子どもたちが人間関係を学ぶ方法を研究しています。

  • from the parental situation.

    親の事情から。

  • And she came up with a very fascinating analysis.

    そして、彼女はとても魅力的な分析をしてくれました。

  • She argued that when children are small, very small, they don't really realize that a parent

    彼女は、子供がとても小さい時には、親の存在を実感していないと主張しました。

  • is one character.

    は一文字です。

  • They actually do what she called split a parent into a good parent and a bad parent.

    実際に彼女が親を良い親と悪い親に分けると言ったことをしています。

  • And so this is when a baby is really at an infant stage.

    で、これは赤ちゃんが本当に乳児期に入った時の話なんです。

  • So what you do is you split into the good mother or -- and the bad mother.

    良い母親と悪い母親に 分かれるんですね

  • And it takes a long, long time.

    そして、それには長い長い時間がかかります。

  • Melanie Klein thought it might be until you are 4 until you actually realize that the

    メラニー・クラインは、実際に気づくまでは4歳までかもしれないと思っていました。

  • good and the bad mother are one person and you become ambivalent.

    良い母親と悪い母親が一人になってアンビバレントになる。

  • In other words, you become able to hate someone and really go off them and at the same time

    つまり、誰かを嫌いになって、その人から離れていくことができるようになると同時に

  • also love them and you are able not to run away from that situation.

    また、彼らを愛しているからこそ、その状況から逃げずにいられるのではないでしょうか。

  • You are able to say, "I love someone and hate them and that's okay."

    "好きな人も嫌いな人も、それでいいんだ "と言えるようになる。

  • And Melanie Klein thought this was an immense psychological achievement when we can no longer

    メラニー・クラインは、これは計り知れない心理的な成果だと考えていました。

  • merely divide people into absolutely brilliant, perfect, marvelous and hateful, let me down,

    単に人々を絶対的に輝かしく、完璧で、驚異的で、憎むべきものに分けるだけで、私を降ろしてください。

  • disappointed me.

    がっかりした

  • Everyone who we love is going to disappoint us.

    愛する人は皆、私たちを失望させてしまうのです。

  • We start off with idealization, and we end up often with denigration.

    最初は理想化から始まり、最後には否定に終わることが多いです。

  • The person goes from being absolutely marvelous to being absolutely terrible.

    人は絶対的に素晴らしいところから、絶対的にひどいところまで行く。

  • Maturity is the ability to see that there are no heros or sinners really among human

    成熟とは、人間の中には英雄も罪人もいないことを見抜く能力である。

  • beings.

    の存在。

  • All of us are this wonderfully perplexing mixture of the good and the bad.

    私たちは皆、良いものと悪いものが入り混じった、この素晴らしく不可解な混合物なのです。

  • And adulthood, true psychological maturity -- you may need to be 65 before it hits you.

    そして、成人期、真の心理的成熟 -- それがあなたを襲う前に、あなたは65歳になる必要があるかもしれません。

  • I'm not there yet -- is the capacity to realize that anyone that you love is going to be this

    私はまだそこにはいない--愛する人は誰でもこうなると気づく能力があるのか。

  • mixture of the good and the bad.

    良いものと悪いものが入り混じった

  • So love is not just admiration for strength.

    だから、愛とは強さへの賞賛だけではない。

  • It is also tolerance for weakness and recognition of ambivalence.

    また、弱さへの寛容さや、アンビバレンスの認識でもあります。

  • The reason why we are going to probably make some real mistakes when we choose our love

    恋愛を選ぶときに、おそらく本当の失敗をしそうな理由

  • partners, some of you in this room have made some stunning mistakes.

    パートナー この部屋にいる何人かは 驚くべき間違いを犯している

  • Now, why is this?

    さて、これはなぜでしょうか?

  • The reason is that we have been told that the way to find a good partner is to follow

    というのも、良いパートナーを見つける方法としては、次のように言われているからです。

  • your instinct; right?

    お前の本能だろ?

  • Follow your heart.

    自分の心に従ってください。

  • That's the mantra.

    それがマントラです。

  • And so we are all the time reminded that if we stop reasoning, analyzing -- By the way,

    だから私たちはいつも思い知らされているのですが、もし私たちが推論や分析をやめたら...

  • are there people in this room who think that you can think too much about your emotions?

    この部屋には、自分の感情を考えすぎてもいいと思っている人がいるのでしょうか?

  • That sort of view people get you can think too much.

    その種のビューの人々は、あなたがあまりにも多くを考えることができます取得します。

  • A few people.

    何人かの人。

  • Okay.

    いいわよ

  • You can't think too much.

    考えすぎてはいけません。

  • You can only overthink badly.

    下手に考えすぎても仕方がない。