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  • Hi, I’m Oli. Welcome to Oxford Online English! In this lesson, you can learn how to speak

  • more fluently in English.

  • How long have you been studying English? Do you find that sometimes that even though you

  • study hard, you can’t speak fluently? Do you learn lots of grammar and vocabulary,

  • but you find it difficult to make sentences when you speak.

  • In this lesson, were going to talk about fluency and what you can do to change this

  • situation and improve your English fluency.

  • Part one: what is fluency?

  • Sometimes, when people talk about fluency, they just mean speaking a language well. For

  • some people, speaking English fluently just means having a good general level of English.

  • However, fluency is more specific than that. Fluency means you can speak smoothly, without

  • stopping or hesitating.

  • There are two sides to fluency. One side is physical: your mouth needs to produce and

  • connect English sounds and words in a fast, smooth way.

  • The other side of fluency is mental: your brain needs to find the right words and build

  • English sentences quickly and smoothly.

  • To improve your fluency, you need to work on both sides: physical and mental.

  • But first

  • Part two: rule number one: get out there!

  • There are many things you can do to improve your English fluency.

  • However, if you want to become more fluent, there’s really one thing you have to do.

  • Get out there and speak English. Talk to people and have conversations regularly. Nothing

  • else you can do is as important as this.

  • Reading English will improve your reading. Practicing listening will improve your listening.

  • But what about speaking? Nothing will help your speaking except speaking.

  • Speaking English is a practical skill. It’s not an academic subject; it’s not something

  • you can learn from a book.

  • It’s more like doing a sport or playing a musical instrument: you need to practice

  • regularly to make any progress.

  • How regularly? As often as you can!

  • There’s no maximum, but I’d recommend you need to spend at least 2-3 hours a week

  • speaking English if you want to improve.

  • So, how can you do this?

  • Go to classes, talk to expats in your city, join groups or activities with English-speakers,

  • find a conversation partner online, do a language exchange; there are many possibilities!

  • By the way, what you do doesn’t have to be language-focused. You can go to English

  • classes to practice your speaking, but anything you do which is in English and which will

  • make you speak English is just as good.

  • I’m going to take a guess here about what many of you are thinking right now: “But

  • I don’t have people to talk to”; “But I’m shy”; “But it’s too difficult.”

  • Let’s talk about that quickly.

  • Part three: get used to pressure.

  • Speaking a foreign language is hard. Situations which would be easy in your language can feel

  • difficult in another language. Situations which would feel difficult in your language

  • can feel almost impossible when you have to do them in a foreign language.

  • That’s how it is. It’s easy to imagine when you start learning another language that

  • you will reach a point where everything is easy and comfortable.

  • But unless you live in a foreign country and live completely inside that culture, that

  • won’t happen. Trust me—I’ve studied several languages at this point in my life,

  • and speak them quite well, but it never feels easy or comfortable.

  • Why are we talking about this? I’m trying to motivate you to go out and speak more,

  • practice more. To do that, you have to accept that it will feel difficult, uncomfortable

  • and intimidating a lot of the time.

  • That’s how it isdon’t let it stop you! You can still practice, you can still communicate,

  • and you can still improve.

  • I’ll give you an example of this from my own experience. I hate making phone calls

  • in another language. I don’t know why, but I find it particularly intimidating. I guess

  • because I can’t use context or facial expressions or anything like that to help me understand

  • or communicate.

  • I lived in Russia and I studied Russian. I hated making phone calls in Russian. Then

  • I lived in China and I studied Chinese. I hated making phone calls in Chinese. Now I’m

  • studying Greek. Guess what? I hate making phone calls in Greek, too.

  • It still feels just as difficult and just as intimidating. I haven’t learned any tricks

  • to make it easier. All I’ve done is that I accept that this is how it feels. That’s

  • it. I still do it, because I have to sometimes.

  • I just accept that I’m going to feel nervous or uncomfortable, and I have to speak and

  • communicate anyway.

  • And I do! It doesn't stop you. Feeling nervous does not stop you communicating.

  • This will be the same for you sometimes. It might be phone calls; it might be something

  • else.

  • The key point? You have to accept and learn to deal with that pressure. Don’t think:

  • it feels scary, so I won’t do it. It won’t feel less scary in the future. The only way

  • to make it easier is to go out and do it.

  • If you do that, you'll feel more confident. It will get a little bit easier with time.

  • Okay, so you know the most important point about fluency, but is there anything else

  • you can do to practice? Yes, there is!

  • Part four: speed reading.

  • Find a text in English. It can be something from a textbook, from a newspaper, from a

  • blog, or anywhere.

  • The text should be fairly easy for you. Don’t choose something with a lot of new words or

  • something which is way above your current English level.

  • Sit down with a timer. Read the text aloud. Time yourself.

  • Now, read it again. Try to beat your previous time!

  • Keep going like this. See how fast you can read the text.

  • What’s this for?

  • Remember that part of fluency is physical. Your mouth needs to produce English sounds

  • and English words fast and smoothly.

  • Speed reading like this is a good way to practice that side of fluency.

  • This way of practicing is really useful because you can do it almost anywhere and you can

  • also do as much or as little as you have time for. You can do five minutes practice or fifteen

  • minutes, or half an hour. It’s all helpful!

  • Let’s see another good technique like this:

  • Part five: using songs.

  • Find a song in English. Choose something which you like.

  • Find the lyrics online. If you don’t know where to look, just put the song title and

  • the wordlyricsinto Google. Youll find them.

  • Play the song. Read the lyrics. Sing!

  • Like with speed reading, this is a good technique to practice the physical side of fluency.

  • When you sing a song, you have to go at the speed of the song.

  • Start with slower songs, then choose faster ones. Try to choose something that’s possible

  • but challenging, so you can sing the song, but it’s difficult to go fast enough.

  • Again, this will really help with your physical fluency. It’s also easy to do; you can do

  • one song a day, and I promise you that you will feel a difference quite quickly. I used

  • this technique a lot when I was learning Chinese, and it really helped.

  • Speed reading and singing songs are good for physical fluency, but what about the mental

  • side of fluency?

  • Let’s see what you can do to improve that.

  • Part six: learn language in chunks.

  • Here’s a question: how do you learn vocabulary?

  • When I see students learning vocabulary, often it looks like this.

  • People write down the English word, the translation in their own language, and then they try to

  • memorise it.

  • Okay, but what does that have to do with fluency?

  • Think about it: if you learn language like this, youre making your brain do things

  • in a very unnatural and complicated way.

  • First of all, youre learning each word individually. But, when you speak a language,

  • you don’t need individual words, you need phrases and sentences.

  • Secondly, if you do this, youre learning English through your own language. Youre

  • not learning to speak English, youre trying to learn to translate your language into English

  • in your head.

  • So, does this sound familiar? You have a sentence in your head in your own language. You move

  • through the sentence, translating each word into English.

  • If you don’t know the translation of a word, you get stuck, you feel bad about your English,

  • and you stop speaking.

  • You need to break this habit if you want to speak fluently. First of all, this way of

  • thinking and speaking is always slow. It will always be slow, because youre trying to

  • do too many things at once.

  • Youre trying to think and remember things in two languagesit’s too difficult for

  • anybody.

  • So what can you do?

  • We said before that you need phrases and sentences when you speak. So, learn language in phrases

  • and sentences.

  • For example, imagine that someone asks you:

  • "What are you doing this weekend?"

  • Look at three answers:

  • "I’m going to see some old friends." "I’m thinking of going for a bike ride."

  • "I might do some odd jobs around the house."

  • Now, make your own sentences:

  • "I’m going to ________." "I’m thinking of ________."

  • "I might ________."

  • Try to make two or three sentences for each one, so that you use different endings.

  • Now think: if someone asks you this question:

  • "What are you doing this weekend?"

  • If you remember language in big pieces, you only have to remember two things:

  • "(I’m going to) + (see some old friends)." "(I’m going to) + (have dinner with my family)."

  • "(I’m going to) + (watch some old movies)."

  • That makes it easy to respond to questions like this fluently.

  • On the other hand, if you make a sentence in your head in err... your language in your

  • head, and then translate each word into English, it’s much more complicated. You don’t

  • just have to remember two things; you have to remember many things.

  • So, try to learn vocabulary in this way. Take a sentence like:

  • "I went for a walk yesterday."

  • Keep the basic sentence form, but change part of it:

  • "I ________ yesterday."

  • Now, make 2-3 different sentences:

  • "I took an exam yesterday." "I was lazy all day yesterday."

  • "I cooked a spicy curry yesterday."

  • Now, practice and remember the sentences and phrases. This is a much more natural way to

  • learn vocabulary.

  • If you learn vocabulary like this, it will be much easier to respond fluently, because

  • you won’t need to think in your own language and translate. Youll remember the whole

  • phrases and sentences that you need.

  • Okay, that’s the end of our lesson. I hope you learned something about spoken fluency

  • and how you can improve your fluency in English!

  • You can find more free English lessons on our website: Oxford Online English dot com.

  • Thanks for watching, see you next time!

Hi, I’m Oli. Welcome to Oxford Online English! In this lesson, you can learn how to speak

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英語を流暢に話す - 英語の流暢さを向上させる方法 (Speak English Fluently - How to Improve Your English Fluency)

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    Darren に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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