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  • - First of all, I wanna just thank you all

  • for the privilege to be here, not only hopefully

  • to serve you for a few minutes here,

  • but also to attend.

  • I have some friends that have gone to TED in the past

  • and I been thinking about coming and I was on the edge

  • and then I got invited and I said I wanna come.

  • So I've attended about two-thirds of this

  • and I've gotten an enormous amount,

  • not only from the speakers,

  • but from so many people that I've met.

  • I don't think in all the places I've spoken

  • or been around, and I've been privileged

  • to be in a lot of great places as I'm sure you have,

  • I've ever seen such a concentration of both talent,

  • brains, but also passion and a common value.

  • There's a community here about contribution

  • and is really beautiful.

  • So I thank you, I'll be back as a participant myself

  • on an ongoing basis and I thank everybody

  • for their participation as well very much.

  • (clapping)

  • Thank you.

  • I have to tell you I'm both challenged and excited.

  • My excitement is I get a chance to give something back.

  • My challenge is the shortest seminar

  • I usually do is 50 hours.

  • (audience laughs)

  • I'm not exaggerating, I do weekends,

  • I do more than that obviously, coach people,

  • but I'm into immersion because how'd you learn language?

  • You didn't learn it by just learning principles,

  • you got in it and you did it so often

  • that it became real and my stuff isn't preprogrammed.

  • Something happens in the room, I ask a question

  • and I play off what's going there.

  • And 17 minutes, that's not gonna happen.

  • I know we're gonna put the principles across

  • and I'm beyond respectful to the format.

  • I've gotten great value from it,

  • although Lisa Randall, I felt very tough for

  • how to explain Einstein's theories in 18 minutes.

  • To make sure that you're served though,

  • 'cause I really came here to serve,

  • is I put some tapes in your box but I want you know

  • that if you wanna use NET time, I call it,

  • no extra time to learn some of these things

  • and use them on a deeper level.

  • If you call my office and you're from TED,

  • you're on the list, you can get any product I have.

  • There's no charge for it.

  • If you ever wanna come to a seminar

  • I'd love to have you as my guest as well

  • for something of more depth.

  • So my gift to you.

  • (clapping)

  • Thank you, thank you.

  • So, the race begins.

  • I've probably put a lot in here

  • 'cause I really wanna try and serve you

  • and I hope it doesn't just sound like philosophy

  • since we can't do the interaction at the same level,

  • although I hope you'll participate with me a bit.

  • The bottom line of why I'm here is that

  • I'm really in a position, I'm not here to motivate you

  • obviously, you don't need that.

  • A lot of times that's what people think I do

  • and it's the furthest thing from it.

  • What happens though is people say to me,

  • "I don't need any motivation!"

  • And I say, well that's interesting, that's not what I do.

  • I'm the why guy.

  • I wanna know why you do what you do.

  • What is your motive for action?

  • What is it that drives you in your life today,

  • not 10 years ago, or you running the same pattern?

  • Because I believe that the invisible force

  • of internal drive, activated,

  • is the most important thing in the world.

  • I'm here because I believe emotion is the force of life.

  • All of us here have great minds.

  • Most of us here have great minds (chuckles), right?

  • I don't know if I'm in the category,

  • but we all know how to think and with our minds

  • we can rationalize anything, we can make anything happen.

  • I agree with what was described a few days ago

  • about this idea that people work in their self-interest,

  • but we all know that you don't work

  • in your self-interest all the time.

  • Because when emotion comes into it the wiring changes

  • in the way it functions.

  • So it's wonderful for us to think intellectually

  • about how the life of the world is,

  • and especially those who are very smart.

  • We can play this game in our head

  • but I really wanna know what's driving you,

  • and what I'd like to maybe invite you to do

  • by the end of this talk is explore

  • where you are today for two reasons.

  • One, so that you can contribute more.

  • And two, so that hopefully we can not just understand

  • other people more but maybe appreciate them more

  • and create the kinds of connections that can stop

  • some of the challenges that we face in our society today

  • that are only gonna get magnified

  • by the very technology that's connecting us.

  • 'Cause it's making us intersect

  • and that intersection doesn't always create the view

  • of everybody now understands everybody

  • and everybody appreciates everybody.

  • I've had obsession basically for 30 years,

  • and that obsession has been what makes the difference

  • in the quality of people's lives?

  • What makes the difference in their performance

  • 'cause that's what I got hired to do.

  • I gotta produce the result now,

  • that's what I've done for 30 years.

  • I get the phone call when the athlete is burning down

  • on national television and they were ahead

  • by five strokes and now they can't get back on the course.

  • And I gotta do somethin' right now

  • to get the result or nothing matters.

  • I get the phone call when the child's gonna commit suicide

  • and I gotta do somethin' right now.

  • And in 29 years, I'm very grateful to tell ya,

  • I've never lost one in 29 years.

  • Doesn't mean I won't someday, but I haven't done it.

  • And the reason is the understanding of these

  • human needs that I wanna talk to you about.

  • When I get those calls about performance,

  • that's one thing, like how do you make a change?

  • But also, I'm looking to see what is it

  • that's shaping that person's ability to contribute?

  • To do something beyond themselves.

  • So maybe the real question is,

  • I look at life and say there's two master lessons.

  • One is, there's the science of achievement

  • which almost everybody in this room has mastered

  • to an amazing extent.

  • That's how do you take the invisible and make it visible.

  • How do you take what you're dreamin' out

  • and make it happen?

  • Whether it be your business,

  • your contribution to society,

  • money, whatever it is for you.

  • Your body, your family.

  • But the other lesson of life that is rarely mastered

  • is the art of fulfillment.

  • 'Cause science is easy, right?

  • We know the rules, you write the code,

  • you fold the, and you get the result.

  • Once you know the game, you just,

  • you up the ante, don't you?

  • But when it comes to fulfillment, that's an art,

  • and the reason is it's about appreciation

  • and it's about contribution.

  • You can only feel so much by yourself.

  • I've had an interesting laboratory to try

  • to answer the question of the real question

  • which is what's the difference in somebody's life

  • if you look at somebody like those people

  • that you've given everything to.

  • Like all the resources they say they need.

  • You gave them not a hundred-dollar computer,

  • you gave them the best computer.

  • You gave them love, you gave 'em joy,

  • you were there to comfort them.

  • And those people very often,

  • and you know some of them I'm sure,

  • end up the rest of their life with all this love,

  • education, money, and background,

  • spending their life going in and out of rehab.

  • And then you meet people that've been through ultimate pain.

  • Psychologically, sexually, spiritually,

  • emotionally abused, and not always,

  • but often they become some of the people

  • that contribute the most to society.

  • So the question we gotta ask ourselves really is,

  • what is it?

  • What is it that shapes us?

  • We live in a therapy culture, most of us don't do that,

  • but the culture's a therapy culture and what I mean by that

  • is the mindset that we are our past.

  • Everybody in this room, you wouldn't be in this room

  • if you bought that theory,

  • but the most of society thinks biography is destiny.

  • The past equals the future.

  • Of course it does if you live there.

  • But what people in this room know

  • and what we have to remind ourselves though,

  • 'cause you can know something intellectually.

  • You can know what to do and then not use it, not apply it.

  • So really we're gonna remind ourselves

  • is decision is the ultimate power.

  • That's what it really is.

  • Now when you ask people,

  • have you failed to achieve something?

  • How many have ever failed to achieve

  • something significant in your life, say aye.

  • - [Audience] Aye.

  • - Thanks for the interaction on a high level there.

  • (audience laughs)

  • But if you ask people why didn't you achieve something?

  • Somebody who's working for you,

  • or a partner, or even yourself,

  • and you failed to achieve a goal,

  • what's the reason people say they failed to achieve?

  • What do they tell ya?

  • Tell me, come on, out loud.

  • Didn't know enough.

  • Didn't have the knowledge.

  • Didn't have the, money.

  • Didn't have the, time.

  • Didn't have the, technology.

  • I didn't have the right manager.

  • - [Voiceover] Supreme Court.

  • - Didn't have the Supreme Court.

  • (laughing loudly)

  • (clapping and cheering)

  • And,

  • what do all those, including the Supreme Court,

  • have in common?

  • They are a claim to you missing resources,

  • and they may be accurate.

  • You may not have the money,

  • you may not have the Supreme Court,

  • but that is not the defining factor.

  • (audience laughs)

  • And you correct me if I'm wrong.

  • The defining factor is never resources,

  • it's resourcefulness.

  • And what I mean specifically rather than just some phrase,

  • is if you have emotion, human emotion,

  • something that I experienced from you day before yesterday

  • at a level that is as profound as I've ever experienced,

  • and if you'd communicated with that emotion

  • I believe you would've won.

  • (audience cheers)

  • But, how easy for me to tell him what he should do.

  • (audience laughs)

  • Idiot, Robbins.

  • But I know, when we watch the debates,

  • when we watched the debate at that time,

  • there were emotions that blocked people's ability

  • to get this man's intellect and capacity

  • and the way they came across to some people on that day.

  • 'Cause I know people that wanted to vote

  • in your direction and didn't, and I was upset.

  • But there was emotion that was there.

  • How many know what I'm talkin' about here, say aye.

  • - [Audience] Aye.

  • - So emotion is it, if we get the right emotion

  • we can get ourselves to do anything.

  • We can get through it.

  • If you're creative enough, playful enough,

  • fun enough, can you get through to anybody, yes or no?

  • - [Audience] Yes.