Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • How do you find a dinosaur?

    どうやって恐竜を見つけるのか?

  • Sounds impossible, doesn't it?

    無理そうですよね?

  • It's not.

    でも そうでもありません

  • And the answer relies on a formula that all paleontologists use.

    その答えは古生物学者なら 誰でも使う ある公式のおかげです

  • And I'm going to tell you the secret.

    これから秘訣をお話しします

  • First, find rocks of the right age.

    まず 正しい年代の岩石を見つけること

  • Second, those rocks must be sedimentary rocks.

    次に その岩石が堆積岩であること

  • And third, layers of those rocks must be naturally exposed.

    それから 堆積岩の地層が 自然に露出したものであること

  • That's it.

    それだけです

  • Find those three things and get yourself on the ground,

    その3つを備えた場所に行けば

  • chances are good that you will find fossils.

    化石が見つかる可能性は高まります

  • Now let me break down this formula.

    その公式を一つずつ見ていきましょう

  • Organisms exist only during certain geological intervals.

    生物は それぞれ特定の 地質時代に生息します

  • So you have to find rocks of the right age,

    だから自分の興味に応じて

  • depending on what your interests are.

    正しい時代の岩石を 見つけ出さねければなりません

  • If you want to find trilobites,

    三葉虫を見つけようと思ったら

  • you have to find the really, really old rocks of the Paleozoic --

    とっても とっても古い古生代の岩石-

  • rocks between a half a billion and a quarter-billion years old.

    5億年前〜2.5億年前の岩石を 見つけなければなりません

  • Now, if you want to find dinosaurs,

    でも恐竜を見つけたいのなら

  • don't look in the Paleozoic, you won't find them.

    古生代の岩石を探しても 見つかりません

  • They hadn't evolved yet.

    まだ恐竜は出現していませんから

  • You have to find the younger rocks of the Mesozoic,

    より新しい 中生代の岩石 さらに その中でも

  • and in the case of dinosaurs,

    恐竜の場合なら

  • between 235 and 66 million years ago.

    2億3千5百万年〜6千6百万年前の 岩石を探さなくてはなりません

  • Now, it's fairly easy to find rocks of the right age at this point,

    正しい年代の岩を見つけるところまでは まあまあ簡単です

  • because the Earth is, to a coarse degree,

    なぜなら地球上どこでも ある程度の精度の地質図が

  • geologically mapped.

    作成されているからです

  • This is hard-won information.

    これは苦労して入手した情報です

  • The annals of Earth history are written in rocks,

    地球の年代記は 岩石に書きつけられ

  • one chapter upon the next,

    次々と重なっていって

  • such that the oldest pages are on bottom

    一番古いページが下で

  • and the youngest on top.

    一番新しいページが上になります

  • Now, were it quite that easy, geologists would rejoice.

    そんなに簡単なら 地質学者にとって喜ばしいことですが

  • It's not.

    実際は違います

  • The library of Earth is an old one.

    地球という図書館は とても古い上に

  • It has no librarian to impose order.

    順序を整理する図書館員もいません

  • Operating over vast swaths of time,

    長い時間の流れの中で

  • myriad geological processes offer every possible insult

    無数の地質学的過程が 古い岩石に

  • to the rocks of ages.

    あらゆる損傷をもたらします

  • Most pages are destroyed soon after being written.

    大半のページは書かれると すぐに壊されます

  • Some pages are overwritten,

    ページの中には何度も上書きされた

  • creating difficult-to-decipher palimpsests of long-gone landscapes.

    太古の光景を記録する羊皮紙のように 判読が難しいものもあります

  • Pages that do find sanctuary under the advancing sands of time

    時と共に積み重なった砂の下で 守られたページでも

  • are never truly safe.

    真に安全とは言えません

  • Unlike the Moon -- our dead, rocky companion --

    地球の相棒の月は 岩だらけで すでに死んでいますが

  • the Earth is alive, pulsing with creative and destructive forces

    地球は生きていて 創造と破壊の力がみなぎり

  • that power its geological metabolism.

    地質的な新陳代謝の源となります

  • Lunar rocks brought back by the Apollo astronauts

    アポロの宇宙飛行士が 持ち帰った月の岩石は全て

  • all date back to about the age of the Solar System.

    太陽系とほぼ同じ年齢を示していました

  • Moon rocks are forever.

    月の岩石は不変です

  • Earth rocks, on the other hand, face the perils of a living lithosphere.

    一方 地球の岩石は 岩石圏の活動により 危機に直面しています

  • All will suffer ruination,

    破断、圧縮、褶曲、熱などが 組み合わさることで

  • through some combination of mutilation, compression,

    岩石が破壊されるのです

  • folding, tearing, scorching and baking.

    だから 地球史という書物は 不完全で乱雑です

  • Thus, the volumes of Earth history are incomplete and disheveled.

    その図書館は膨大で素晴らしいですが

  • The library is vast and magnificent --

    老朽化しているのです

  • but decrepit.

    岩石に残された記録の 混乱と複雑さのせいで

  • And it was this tattered complexity in the rock record

    比較的最近まで その意味が捉えにくかったのです

  • that obscured its meaning until relatively recently.

    自然は蔵書目録を 与えてくれなかったので

  • Nature provided no card catalog for geologists --

    地質学者が考案する必要がありました

  • this would have to be invented.

    シュメール人が粘土板に 考えを記録することを思いついてから

  • Five thousand years after the Sumerians learned to record their thoughts

    5千年経っても

  • on clay tablets,

    人間にとって地球史という書物は 謎のままでした

  • the Earth's volumes remained inscrutable to humans.

    私たちに地質を読み解く力はなく

  • We were geologically illiterate,

    我が地球に残された記録にも気付かず

  • unaware of the antiquity of our own planet

    遠い昔と自分たちとの繋がりにも

  • and ignorant of our connection

    無知でした

  • to deep time.

    開眼したのは19世紀になってからでした

  • It wasn't until the turn of the 19th century

    まず ジェームズ・ハットンは 『地球の理論』で

  • that our blinders were removed,

    地球には 始まりの痕跡も 終わりの兆しも

  • first, with the publication of James Hutton's "Theory of the Earth,"

    見当たらないと述べました

  • in which he told us that the Earth reveals no vestige of a beginning

    次にイギリス本土全体の 初の地質図となる

  • and no prospect of an end;

    ウィリアム・スミスの 地図が出版されたことで

  • and then, with the printing of William Smith's map of Britain,

    初めて私たちが

  • the first country-scale geological map,

    どこに どういう種類の岩石があるのかを 予測できるようになりました

  • giving us for the first time

    これを契機に こう言えるようになったのです

  • predictive insight into where certain types of rocks might occur.

    「そこに行けば ジュラ紀の地層に なっているはずだ」とか

  • After that, you could say things like,

    「あの丘を越えれば 白亜紀の地層が見つかるはずだ」と

  • "If we go over there, we should be in the Jurassic,"

    だから 三葉虫を発掘したいなら

  • or, "If we go up over that hill, we should find the Cretaceous."

    正しい地質図を入手し

  • So now, if you want to find trilobites,

    古生代の岩石のある所へ行ってください

  • get yourself a good geological map

    皆さんが私のように 恐竜を見つけたいのなら

  • and go to the rocks of the Paleozoic.

    中生代の岩石のある所へ行ってください

  • If you want to find dinosaurs like I do,

    無論 化石は砂や泥からできた

  • find the rocks of Mesozoic and go there.

    堆積岩の中にしか見つかりません

  • Now of course, you can only make a fossil in a sedimentary rock,

    花崗岩のように

  • a rock made by sand and mud.

    マグマから作られた火成岩や

  • You can't have a fossil

    熱や圧力によって作られた変成岩には 化石は見つかりません

  • in an igneous rock formed by magma, like a granite,

    さらに 砂漠へ行かなければなりません

  • or in a metamorphic rock that's been heated and squeezed.

    ただし砂漠だけに恐竜がいた という意味ではありません

  • And you have to get yourself in a desert.

    恐竜は全ての大陸の

  • It's not that dinosaurs particularly lived in deserts;

    考えうる あらゆる環境下で 生きていました

  • they lived on every land mass

    今は砂漠になっている場所に 行くべきだという意味です

  • and in every imaginable environment.

    岩石を覆う植物が多すぎず

  • It's that you need to go to a place that's a desert today,

    浸食により常に新しい骨が 地表に露出する所だからです

  • a place that doesn't have too many plants covering up the rocks,

    だから この3つを探しましょう

  • and a place where erosion is always exposing new bones at the surface.

    目指す年代の

  • So find those three things:

    堆積岩で 砂漠にあるものです

  • rocks of the right age,

    そして自分で その場所に行き

  • that are sedimentary rocks, in a desert,

    文字どおり歩き回って

  • and get yourself on the ground,

    岩から突き出した骨を 見つけるのです

  • and you literally walk

    この写真は私が パタゴニア南部で撮ったものです

  • until you see a bone sticking out of the rock.

    地面にある小石はすべて

  • Here's a picture that I took in Southern Patagonia.

    恐竜の骨の破片です

  • Every pebble that you see on the ground there

    適切な状況下にいれば

  • is a piece of dinosaur bone.

    化石が見つかるかどうかは 問題ではありません

  • So when you're in that right situation,

    化石は見つかるものです

  • it's not a question of whether you'll find fossils or not;

    それより 科学的に重要なものが 見つかるかどうかが問題です

  • you're going to find fossils.

    この点を解決する 4つ目の公式をお話ししましょう

  • The question is: Will you find something that is scientifically significant?

    こういうことです

  • And to help with that, I'm going to add a fourth part to our formula,

    他の古生物学者から 出来る限り遠くへ離れること

  • which is this:

    (笑)

  • get as far away from other paleontologists as possible.

    他の古生物学者が 嫌いなわけではありません

  • (Laughter)

    比較的調査が進んでいない所に行けば

  • It's not that I don't like other paleontologists.

    化石が見つかるだけでなく 科学に貢献する

  • When you go to a place that's relatively unexplored,

    新しい発見の可能性が ずっと高くなるからです

  • you have a much better chance of not only finding fossils

    これが恐竜を見つける 私の方法で

  • but of finding something that's new to science.

    世界中で試しています

  • So that's my formula for finding dinosaurs,

    2004年 南半球の夏季に

  • and I've applied it all around the world.

    私は南アメリカの果て―

  • In the austral summer of 2004,

    アルゼンチンのパタゴニアの奥地まで

  • I went to the bottom of South America,

    恐竜が見つかることを期待して行きました

  • to the bottom of Patagonia, Argentina,

    そこには適切な年代の 陸成の堆積岩があり

  • to prospect for dinosaurs:

    砂漠であり

  • a place that had terrestrial sedimentary rocks of the right age,

    古生物学者がほとんど行かない所です

  • in a desert,

    そしてこれを見つけたのです

  • a place that had been barely visited by paleontologists.

    これは大腿骨 つまり腿の骨で

  • And we found this.

    巨大な植物食恐竜のものです

  • This is a femur, a thigh bone,

    その骨は2.2メートルの長さがあり

  • of a giant, plant-eating dinosaur.

    つまり7フィートを超えています

  • That bone is 2.2 meters across.

    ただ残念なことに これ1本だけでした

  • That's over seven feet long.

    私たちは掘りまくったのですが 周辺では別の骨は出ませんでした

  • Now, unfortunately, that bone was isolated.

    でも おかげで翌年も来て もっと調べたくなりました

  • We dug and dug and dug, and there wasn't another bone around.

    そして翌年の現地調査の初日に

  • But it made us hungry to go back the next year for more.

    私はこれを見つけました またもや2メートルもある大腿骨です

  • And on the first day of that next field season,

    今回は1本だけでなく

  • I found this: another two-meter femur,

    巨大な1体の植物食恐竜の145個の骨を

  • only this time not isolated,

    見つけることができました

  • this time associated with 145 other bones

    とても大変で 過酷な 3度の野外調査期間を終えると

  • of a giant plant eater.

    石切り場はこうなりました

  • And after three more hard, really brutal field seasons,

    私を取り巻いているのが 巨大恐竜の尻尾です

  • the quarry came to look like this.

    ここに横たわっている恐竜は新種で

  • And there you see the tail of that great beast wrapping around me.

    後に「ドレッドノータス・シュラニ」と 命名しました

  • The giant that lay in this grave, the new species of dinosaur,

    ドレッドノータスは鼻先から尻尾まで 26メートルあります

  • we would eventually call "Dreadnoughtus schrani."

    肩までが2.5階に相当します

  • Dreadnoughtus was 85 feet from snout to tail.

    肉付けして復元すると 体重は65トンありました

  • It stood two-and-a-half stories at the shoulder,

    ドレッドノータスは ティラノサウルスより 大きかったか よく聞かれます

  • and all fleshed out in life, it weighed 65 tons.

    ティラノサウルスの8~9倍の体重です

  • People ask me sometimes, "Was Dreadnoughtus bigger than a T. rex?"

    古生物学者の特権といえば

  • That's the mass of eight or nine T. rex.

    新種を発見した時 名前を付けられることがあります

  • Now, one of the really cool things about being a paleontologist

    私が日頃から残念に思っているのは この巨大な植物食恐竜が

  • is when you find a new species, you get to name it.

    復元図の中では 消極的でウスノロな 肉の塊として描かれることが

  • And I've always thought it a shame that these giant, plant-eating dinosaurs

    あまりに多い点です

  • are too often portrayed as passive, lumbering platters of meat

    (笑)

  • on the landscape.

    でも違うのです

  • (Laughter)

    大型草食動物は短気で 縄張り意識が強い場合があります

  • They're not.

    カバやサイや水牛に ちょっかいを出してはいけません

  • Big herbivores can be surly, and they can be territorial --

    イエローストンのバイソンは グリズリーよりも多くの人を傷つけます

  • you do not want to mess with a hippo or a rhino or a water buffalo.

    想像できますか? 65トンもある 牡牛のようなドレッドノータスが

  • The bison in Yellowstone injure far more people than do the grizzly bears.

    繁殖期に

  • So can you imagine a big bull, 65-ton Dreadnoughtus

    縄張りを守る姿を

  • in the breeding season,

    ドレッドノータスは ひどく凶暴だったことでしょう

  • defending a territory?

    周囲の生き物にとっては脅威である一方 自らは怖がるものが無かったことでしょう

  • That animal would have been incredibly dangerous,

    だから 「ドレッドノータス」

  • a menace to all around, and itself would have had nothing to fear.

    「何も恐れないもの」なのです

  • And thus the name, "Dreadnoughtus,"

    これほど巨大に成長するには

  • or, "fears nothing."

    ドレッドノータスのような動物は 効率的である

  • Now, to grow so large,

    必要がありました

  • an animal like Dreadnoughtus would've had to have been

    長い首と尻尾により体外へ熱を放出し

  • a model of efficiency.

    受動的に体温調整します

  • That long neck and long tail help it radiate heat into the environment,

    さらに その長い首で 非常に効率的に餌を摂ることができます