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  • RON WILCOX: As I drove home from work one day,

  • I reminded myself that my wife had an appointment

  • to get her hair cut.

  • It would be good, I thought, to make a positive comment

  • when I walk in the door.

  • When I walked in, I looked at her hair

  • and had absolutely no idea whether or not she had it cut.

  • Should I risk making a positive comment,

  • only to learn that her appointment had been canceled,

  • and be exposed for the well-intentioned fake

  • that I am?

  • I didn't want to do that, so I remained silent

  • and later found out that she did get her hair cut,

  • and I didn't notice.

  • It turns out that my lack of perception

  • is rooted in some basic psychology that

  • also occurs when we consider the prices we

  • see when we go shopping.

  • If you see a friend who normally wears their hair long

  • and they got a couple of inches cut off, you may not notice.

  • If you see another friend who wears their hair short

  • and they got a couple of inches cut off,

  • you will certainly notice right away.

  • Similarly, if you see a sale for $1 off on a box of cereal,

  • that might seem like a good deal--

  • a purchase worth making given the amount of money saved.

  • But if you happen to see a sale for $1 off on a nice shirt,

  • you'd probably laugh at it.

  • It would seem almost trivial.

  • We tend to experience many changes in life this way.

  • Changes seem big or small depending on how big or small

  • the current situation is.

  • However, the dollar you're saving

  • is the same dollar whether you save it

  • on a box of cereal or a shirt.

  • It just seems different in the context

  • of different sized purchases.

  • The famous psychologist Max Weber

  • studied this kind of effect and found

  • that it was true in a lot of situations, which

  • leads to some important behavioral phenomena

  • that we all need to watch out for.

  • When we spend a lot of money, it is very easy

  • to spend even more.

  • When you buy a car for perhaps $20,000,

  • you will be offered add-ons-- things

  • that you might purchase to make the car a little bit nicer.

  • On any other day, paying $150 for a leather

  • wrapped steering wheel might seem completely ridiculous,

  • but not today.

  • Today you just spent $20,000.

  • What's $150 more?

  • Formally, this effect is known as the Weber-Fechner Law

  • of Pricing.

  • It simply means that we tend to view prices

  • not in absolute terms, but relative to other prices

  • we are thinking about at that moment.

  • Let's do some very quick math to help

  • us understand the Weber-Fechner Law of Pricing.

  • Let's call the price we are currently thinking about p.

  • It may be the price of a car, a shirt, whatever.

  • We will only pay attention to a change in the price

  • we are considering if it is greater than some proportion.

  • Let's call that k.

  • So the change in p divided by p has to be greater than k for us

  • to notice.

  • Now that doesn't mean we're all the same.

  • Some people have really big k's and others, very small.

  • The big k people don't notice relative price differences

  • until they get really big, like 50% off or something like that.

  • The small k people are the real price shoppers.

  • If they see even a small relative price change,

  • they will notice it.

  • But whether you are a big k person or a small k person,

  • the Weber-Fechner Law still holds.

  • You will tend to pay attention to price changes

  • only if the change seems big enough

  • relative to the price you were thinking about at the moment.

  • This means that whenever you are spending a lot of money,

  • you should be extra careful about upgrades, add-ons,

  • extended warranties, any of the kind of extras that might tempt

  • you to spend a little more.

  • Because in that moment you are considering big prices.

  • And these extra costs, by comparison, may seem small.

  • But those extra dollars you are spending

  • are the same dollars that might seem important when

  • you are considering smaller purchases,

  • like that box of cereal that you buy on a regular basis.

  • If you understand the Weber-Fechner Law of Pricing,

  • more of your money might stay in your wallet.

RON WILCOX: As I drove home from work one day,

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A2 初級

BizBasics."ロン・ウィルコックスとの「ウェーバー・フェヒナーの価格設定の法則 (BizBasics: "Weber-Fechner Law of Pricing" with Ron Wilcox)

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    羅紹桀 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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