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  • JESS: Hi, everyone.

  • Hello.

  • Welcome to Authors at Google.

  • So, as you all know, over the past decade,

  • Steve Jobs has changed the way that we

  • think about giving presentations by modeling

  • a new form of interaction types of presentations.

  • Today, we are going to hear from the man that

  • taught the world how to be like Steve Jobs.

  • He has watched hundreds of hours of footage of TED talks,

  • and today, he's doing it again-- teaching

  • us all how to talk like TED.

  • Carmine Gallo.

  • CARMINE GALLO:All right.

  • Thanks, Jess.

  • Good afternoon.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • I feel like I have a lot of microphones on me today.

  • There's multiple streams going on, and that's why the mics.

  • This is such an honor for me to be speaking at Google.

  • First of all, thank you for changing the world.

  • That's astonishing and must be an amazing experience

  • to work here.

  • That's what I want to talk to you about today is

  • world changing ideas.

  • How many of you have good ideas?

  • How many of you think you've got a good idea?

  • OK, most of you.

  • Your ideas are your currency now.

  • Your ideas are the currency of the 21st century.

  • In the information age, the knowledge economy,

  • you're only as successful as your ability

  • to communicate your ideas persuasively.

  • How do you do that?

  • I believe that there are three fundamental laws

  • of communications-- laws that I learned after studying hundreds

  • and hundreds of TED talks and also analyzing and interviewing

  • some of the most famous TED presenters of our time.

  • Now, it's not just me who says that communication skills are

  • so important.

  • Ben Horowitz is a very well-known local venture

  • capitalist.

  • With Andreessen Horowitz, who's behind Facebook and Twitter

  • and many other companies as well, and obviously many of you

  • know him as a substantial investor.

  • He was at South by Southwest and he gave us this quote.

  • "Storytelling is the most underrated skill

  • when it comes to entrepreneurship."

  • he was speaking specifically to entrepreneurs.

  • Storytelling-- the ability to tell your story convincingly,

  • persuasively, in a way that really engages me--

  • that's going to be your value.

  • That's going to help you stand out in all of the noise

  • and to stand out and move your brand forward and your careers

  • forward.

  • Ben Horowitz believes that.

  • I certainly believe that.

  • And this gentleman believes that.

  • You may have seen him before-- Warren Buffett,

  • the billionaire.

  • Listen to this audio clip where he

  • is telling a group of business students--

  • I believe this was Columbia University--

  • he's talking to a group of business students.

  • Listen to the value that he places

  • on communication skills and public speaking.

  • [VIDEO PLAYBACK]

  • -Right now I would pay $100,000 for 10%

  • of the future earnings of any of you.

  • So if anyone wants to see me after this is over--

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • If that's true, if you're a million-dollar asset right now,

  • right, if 10% of you is worth $100,000?

  • You could improve-- many of you, and I certainly

  • could have when I got out, just in terms

  • of learning communication skills.

  • It's not something that is taught.

  • I actually went to a Dale Carnegie course

  • later on in terms of public speaking.

  • But if you improve your value 50% by having communication

  • skills, that's another $500,000 in terms of capital value.

  • See me after the class and I'll pay you $150,000.

  • [END VIDEO PLAYBACK]

  • CARMINE GALLO: Why would he say that?

  • Because Daniel Pink, a noted author, has recently observed,

  • "like it or not, we're all in sales now."

  • That means that you are constantly

  • selling yourself and selling your ideas internally

  • and externally.

  • It's the 21st century.

  • We have new models of communication, don't we?

  • We communicate in photos, videos, 140-character tweets.

  • Well, I believe that a 21st century model of communication

  • requires 21st century techniques, which

  • is why I turned my lens from Steve Jobs, who

  • was one individual-- and in my opinion, the greatest

  • corporate storyteller we've ever had--

  • and I turned my focus onto TED, the TED talks.

  • TED, even though I'm independent, I'm objective,

  • I'm not affiliated with that conference,

  • I've worked with many TED speakers.

  • I've interviewed TED speakers.

  • I've analyzed 150 hours worth of TED content

  • and I've categorized it.

  • And I think I know why the best TED talks go viral.

  • But more importantly for all of us in the room

  • is what can we learn from the world's greatest

  • presenters and speakers that we can apply

  • to make our message, our pitch, more persuasive, more

  • convincing?

  • Especially if you only have-- let's

  • say you don't have 18 minutes.

  • You have five minutes to convince your boss

  • to back your idea.

  • How do you get it across?

  • How do you persuade?

  • That's what we're going to talk about today.

  • I believe that there are three fundamental components

  • that all inspirational communication has.

  • Any time there is a conversation, a presentation,

  • a pitch that we consider persuasive,

  • these are the three components that they have.

  • They are emotional-- that conversation is emotional.

  • You have to touch my heart before you reach my head.

  • Those conversations are novel.

  • They teach me something new.

  • And finally, they're also memorable.

  • It doesn't matter.

  • Your idea doesn't matter if I can't remember what you said.

  • So we're going to talk about each one one by one.

  • Let's talk about emotional.

  • How do we make ideas emotional?

  • First, passion.

  • Passion is everything.

  • You cannot inspire unless you're inspired yourself.

  • It's also important for your career.

  • Dr. Larry Smith gave a very famous TEDx event.

  • He is a University of Waterloo economics professor.

  • He's been studying passion and entrepreneurship for decades.

  • And he says passion is the thing, the thing that

  • will help you create the highest expression of your talent.

  • I asked him after his TED talk, I asked Dr. Smith,

  • how do you identify passion?

  • This all sounds good, and I agree with it.

  • But how do you identify it?

  • What is it when we say, that person

  • is passionate about something?

  • I want to follow my passion.

  • That sounds so cliche.

  • What exactly does that mean.

  • He pointed me to an excerpt from his now-famous TED talk,

  • and here's what he says about what passion means.

  • Probably the best definition I've heard.

  • [VIDEO PLAYBACK]

  • -Passion is your greatest love.

  • Passion is the thing that will help you create the highest

  • expression of your talent.

  • Passion, interest, it's not the same thing.

  • Are you really going to go to your sweetie

  • and say, marry me, if you're interested?

  • Won't happen.

  • Won't happen, and you will die alone.

  • What you want.

  • What you want.

  • What you want is passion.

  • It is beyond interest.

  • You need 20 interests, and then one of them, one of them

  • might grab you.

  • One of them may engage you more than anything else,

  • and then you may have found your greatest love in comparison

  • to all the other things that interest you.

  • And that's what passion is.

  • [END VIDEO PLAYBACK]

  • CARMINE GALLO: OK, your greatest love.

  • By the way, he's really passionate, isn't he?

  • He's worked up.

  • And I asked him, Dr. Smith, you're going nuts on this.

  • What's happening?

  • He said, Carmine, what you have seen

  • is 40 years of pent-up frustration,

  • of telling people that they need to follow

  • their passion in order to create the highest

  • expression of their talent.

  • And he said, Carmine, wasted talent is a waste I cannot

  • stand, which is why passion is so important to him.

  • But I love that definition-- your greatest love.

  • How does that relate to us?

  • How does that relate to, say, entrepreneurship?

  • I write for "Forbes," also the books that I write.

  • I have this amazing opportunity to interview and spend time

  • with some of the great leaders of our time.

  • Let's talk about this idea of your greatest love,

  • and what does that mean to follow your passion?

  • Here's a photograph of me and Richard Branson.

  • Richard Branson always seems to be smiling.

  • I think when you've got five billion reasons to smile,

  • you're always happy.

  • He's always happy.

  • But when I asked him, what's your greatest love?

  • It's not-- it's not getting people from point A

  • to point B on an airplane.

  • That's not his greatest love.

  • His greatest love is disrupting the status quo.

  • It's elevating the customer experience.

  • Some of you are familiar with Zappos, I'm sure.

  • Tony Hsieh, who's sort of elevated the customer

  • experience, speaking of that.

  • I've interviewed Tony Hsieh.

  • His greatest love is not the shoes,

  • which is very interesting.

  • He sells shoes online, but he wears old shoes

  • till they're worn out.

  • When I asked him, what's your greatest love?

  • He never mentioned shoes.

  • He says it's delivering happiness.

  • How can I deliver happiness to my customers and my employees?

  • Which is why he's created that great culture at Zappos,

  • a culture like many of you have experienced here at Google.

  • The point is, he's always thinking.

  • The most inspiring communicators and entrepreneurs

  • don't really pitch their product as much

  • as they pitch what the product means

  • for the lives of their customers.

  • Big difference.

  • Howard Schultz, the founder of Starbucks-- actually,

  • they he's the founder.

  • No, he's the CEO of Starbucks, and he's

  • going to explain in a video clip I'm going to show.

  • But Howard Schultz, when I interviewed him,

  • completely changed the way I look at communication skills.

  • This was several years ago for one of my books.

  • He spent two hours with me and not

  • once did he talk about coffee.

  • I was the one who brought up coffee.

  • That's because that's not what he's selling.

  • He's selling a better customer experience.

  • He is selling a workplace that treats people

  • with dignity and respect.

  • He's selling community and the romance of coffee,

  • but it's not about the coffee.

  • It's so much deeper than that.

  • He gave me a quote that I'll never forget.

  • He said, Carmine, coffee is the product that we make,

  • but it's not the business we're in.

  • So you need to think about that.

  • That blew my mind.

  • I can't tell you what-- I mean, it completely

  • changed the way I look at communication.

  • You've got to think about not your product,

  • but what business you're in.

  • This week, Oprah Winfrey created her first big product

  • partnership with Starbucks.

  • I think it's the Teavana brand.

  • Some of you may have that tea.

  • It was her first big product partnership,

  • and she decided to go on a partnership with Howard Schultz

  • because-- and I'm paraphrasing-- but she said because Starbucks

  • is so much more than a company.