Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Good afternoon.

  • On a Friday afternoon, look at this crowd,

  • that too before a long weekend, and I know all of you

  • have come here just to listen to me, right?

  • I know you didn't.

  • My name is Ravi Pendse.

  • I have the privilege and honor to serve

  • as Vice President and Chief Information Officer, which

  • means I actually work for all of you.

  • It's my pleasure to welcome you to our Distinguished Lecture

  • Series, Leadership in Technology,

  • and the goal of this series is really

  • to bring transformational technology leaders to Brown

  • campus to help engage with us in a dialogue to help and enhance

  • our amazing students-- and so many of you

  • are here today, that's great-- our wonderful faculty,

  • and our dedicated and innovative staff.

  • Did you use a smartphone today to perhaps

  • pay for that cup of coffee or to download music and listen

  • to music from Spotify or perhaps to do many different things,

  • and you're shaking your heads, right?

  • If you did, chances are some of the information

  • that you consume came from servers made by Dell.

  • Most businesses and universities, Brown included,

  • are exploring ways to mine and analyze data

  • and to derive insights from data.

  • Did you know that a lot of data analytics that

  • are powered at, say, Netflix or Hulu

  • and many other businesses, come from engines-- data analysis

  • engines-- actually made by Dell?

  • If you're thinking about information security

  • and privacy-- and I think about it every day--

  • one of the strongest and largest security profiles-- a company

  • and products-- come from Dell in the company

  • called SecureWorks, and did you know

  • they're right here in Providence, employing hundreds

  • of cyber security professionals?

  • And so great opportunities to engage and partner.

  • And oh, by the way, if I didn't mention,

  • Dell happens to also make some pretty good desktops

  • and nifty laptops.

  • So talk about imagining.

  • Imagine you are 19.

  • For me that imagination is not so easy, but for many of you,

  • you are already 19-- that age frame.

  • Imagine you're 19, sitting in your dorm room.

  • You have $1,000, and instead of going to your next vacation

  • you decide, you know what?

  • I'm going to start a PC company, and I'm

  • going to take on the likes of IBM.

  • That is the story if Michael Dell, our speaker today.

  • Michael Dell, who is the Chairman and CEO of Dell,

  • founded his company in 1984 in a dorm room

  • at University of Texas.

  • Michael's vision for technology fundamentally

  • changed that technology business.

  • He was the first one to establish a company that

  • was directly marketing to consumers over initially--

  • believe it or not-- over phone, and then later

  • on using the web.

  • That was the first company.

  • Only eight years after he started the company, in 1992,

  • Michael became the youngest CEO to be on the Fortune 500 list.

  • Michael and his wife, Susan, understand the importance

  • of giving back.

  • In 1998, they established Michael and Susan Dell

  • foundation to provide philanthropic support

  • to a variety of global causes.

  • To date, they have given-- donated over $1 billion,

  • and their generosity continues.

  • In June 2014, Michael was named the United Nations Foundations

  • first Global Advocate for Entrepreneurship.

  • He serves on many, many boards and committees

  • and too many to list here, but I wanted

  • to share some other facts that you may not be aware.

  • Michael tends to be incredibly competitive-- surprise,

  • surprise, right-- and sometimes impatient.

  • When he was in third grade, he applied for a GED.

  • Think about that.

  • Third grade.

  • I know.

  • He was an over-achiever.

  • What can I say?

  • He's incredibly competitive, as I told you,

  • and on a given day bikes to work for about 22 miles every day.

  • Very active on Fitbit as well, so typically leading

  • among his Fitbit friends.

  • I did a few miles this morning and decided to check out

  • how Michael was doing.

  • Bad idea.

  • I lost miserably.

  • Now, one area that I'm kind of competitive,

  • I'm coming close to Michael, is in the area

  • of Twitter followers.

  • We are only a million apart.

  • I have about 200 followers, and you can guess how many he has.

  • It is my pleasure and honor to introduce

  • Michael Dell, an amazing CEO, a caring and compassionate

  • leader, and a friend.

  • Michael.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • Thank you.

  • Thank you very much.

  • Thank you for the kind introduction, Ravi.

  • Welcome, Michael.

  • I know there are lot of institutions and organizations

  • which obviously want you to go and have a conversation,

  • so I'm so glad that you took time

  • to come to Brown University.

  • Thrilled to be here.

  • Thank you.

  • Thank you.

  • Just so you know, this is going to be an interactive event.

  • Michael and I are going to engage in some dialogue

  • initially.

  • Later, you will have an opportunity to, of course,

  • ask Michael questions.

  • There are microphones on both sides that you can use,

  • and I'll let you know when you can

  • start lining up so we can use your time

  • and Michael's time efficiently.

  • Please note, however, that this event is being live

  • streamed as well as recorded, just so you know.

  • So Michael, you want to get started?

  • Great.

  • All right.

  • So Michael, as we talked about the fact

  • that you started this company when you were barely

  • the age of many students here in our audience,

  • from your dorm room, so can you recap for us

  • how the journey began?

  • How did you go from being a pre-med student,

  • as we know, to suddenly deciding on starting a PC company

  • and taking on the likes of IBM?

  • Can you share some thoughts with us, please?

  • Sure.

  • Well, I could tell you I didn't have this in mind

  • when I started.

  • I didn't know that I would be here today

  • and that all this would happen.

  • What was happening in the early 1980s was,

  • it was sort of the dawn of the microprocessor age,

  • and I had been kind of fortunate in that when

  • I was in seventh grade I was in this math class,

  • and this is even before there was such

  • a thing as a personal computer.

  • There were teletype terminals, and you could write a program

  • on the teletype terminal, you send it off

  • to a bigger computer and the answer would come back,

  • and I was just kind of fascinated by that

  • and enthralled by that, so I started learning

  • everything I could about this.

  • And when I was in high school, some people

  • would like to soup up their cars.

  • I was souping up computers, so I was playing around

  • with microprocessors and circuit boards

  • and trying to understand all that,

  • and one of the things I saw was that the way the products were

  • sold, it took a long time for the latest,

  • best technology to get to the actual user,

  • and it cost a significant multiple of the actual cost

  • of the components.

  • And to me it seemed kind of a criminal that it took so long,

  • and why does it cost-- if it's only $500

  • worth of parts, how come they're selling it for $3,000?

  • And so the initial business was really not necessarily in PCs.

  • It was in upgrade kits for PCs and then very shortly

  • thereafter, we started making our own PCs.

  • And just a little bit backwards, I

  • was a freshman at the University of Texas, and I was pre-med,

  • and I had organic chemistry, and this is really hard stuff,

  • and I'm thinking, there's got to be an easier way

  • to make a living than this stuff.

  • I'm sure a lot of Brown students who take

  • Orgo class can relate to you.