Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • MONICA WALSH: Hello, everyone.

  • And welcome-- welcome to this event at Google, TalksAtGoogle.

  • It's really exciting to see all of you.

  • And everyone who's on the live stream, welcome and hello.

  • I'm excited about today's topic, which is

  • on creativity and innovation.

  • What is creativity?

  • Well, creativity is no different than what we here at Google

  • do every day, which is disrupt, forge new pathways,

  • and ultimately help our users' lives improve.

  • It's a constant way of being in our tech industry.

  • And no matter what industry you're in,

  • the question is, how do we stay connected

  • to that creative force that exists?

  • Well, that's what we're going to explore today.

  • My name is Monica Walsh.

  • And I'm a member of the Streams, Photos,

  • and Sharing team here at Google.

  • And one of the really cool things that I get to do here

  • is work with tons of creative people.

  • One of them is Bradley Horowitz, who happens to be my boss.

  • In his early career, he was an innovator himself,

  • starting his own startup company,

  • which was quite successful.

  • And he's a musician and also leads

  • a lot of innovative products here at Google.

  • I want to just take a minute and acknowledge and thank him

  • because this event was his brainchild.

  • So thank you Bradley for being our host today.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • In the next couple of hours, we're

  • going to go on a journey, a musical journey.

  • We'll have discussions.

  • And yes, there will be music.

  • We're exploring the theme, unlocking creativity.

  • And first, we're going to hear from composer and pianist Kenny

  • Werner.

  • We'll have a brief stand and stretch

  • and then we'll come back for a panel discussion.

  • I'll talk more about the panel in a minute.

  • So first, Kenny.

  • Kenny Werner is a world-class jazz pianist and composer.

  • He's author of a book called "Effortless Mastery."

  • And the book helps artists break through plateaus

  • in their creative process.

  • He's a creative director at the Berklee School

  • of Music in Boston, where he teaches his effortless mastery

  • technique.

  • I've had the pleasure of watching Kenny perform lots

  • and lots of times.

  • And his aptitude for improvisation is mind-blowing.

  • So we're in for a big treat.

  • With that, let's welcome to the stage, Mr. Kenny Werner.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • KENNY WERNER: Thanks, Monica.

  • MONICA WALSH: You're welcome.

  • [MUSIC - KENNY WERNER]

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • KENNY WERNER: Thank you.

  • Thank you.

  • I decided-- I can do these kind of things, like, for hours.

  • And then the problem is stopping.

  • But in a concise amount of the time,

  • I thought it might be good to be able to play and talk,

  • sort of like Victor Borge meets Deepak Chopra.

  • [PLAYING PIANO]

  • Actually it's kind of rare.

  • Most musicians can really play.

  • But they don't like to talk it.

  • And there's some people who are very

  • eloquent in talking about it, but maybe their playing

  • is not so wonderful.

  • And this was just a thing I found I could do.

  • It's almost like "Planet of the Apes," wow, he talks.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • And what I started to talk about was

  • a state of mind, which I knew nothing about.

  • But I just read it when I was working with people.

  • And the basis of it is this.

  • When I'm working with musicians, I say think about a time

  • when you had to play really well and it was

  • really important to do well.

  • How did you play?

  • And usually they kind of look at each other nervously

  • and go, oh, you know, like that.

  • So then I said, well, now think about a time

  • when you were just messing around

  • and it didn't matter what you were doing.

  • Or, for you older musicians, you were playing a wedding

  • and nobody was listening.

  • How did you play then?

  • And they usually say better.

  • So I said, great.

  • Now, the clinic is over.

  • You just found out the most important piece of information.

  • All this time you've been trying to play well.

  • Now that you know when you try to play well you play worse,

  • you're never going to do it again, right?

  • From now on, you'll never try when you play.

  • And, of course, then they laugh a little bit.

  • Because we're programmed, even if they

  • know that in their life when they try harder, they do worse,

  • they still can't help it after about five bars of music.

  • So then we talk about it.

  • We talk about all the things that

  • come up, especially at music school,

  • like, boy, that kid next to me is playing better

  • than me or this guy, he plays better than me and he's

  • younger than me.

  • Or maybe I'm not as talented as I thought I was

  • or it's really important I play well

  • because I want the esteem of the people around me.

  • Whenever that is, the good news is that it's

  • all in the realm of thoughts.

  • And thoughts is where most of the problem is.

  • So I discuss moving out of thoughts and into what

  • I call "The Space."

  • The Space is sort of a nondenominational idea.

  • Every religion has its own name for it,

  • and in psychological circles, super-conscious mind.

  • But basically, everybody knows this space.

  • Everybody's had that experience in this space,

  • I'll say to a musician, did you ever

  • have a time you were playing and it was just happening

  • and you were watching?

  • And most musicians will say, yeah.

  • And I say, and that was the best you ever played, right?

  • And they say, yeah.

  • In fact, you remember where you were

  • and who you were playing with.

  • That's how different that was from all the other times.

  • And they go, yeah.

  • So the whole idea is getting out of the mind,

  • or the conscious mind, and into this space.

  • In the conscious mind, we have the problems

  • with the past and the future.

  • In The Space, you're just in the moment.

  • From the conscious mind, there's all sorts of criteria

  • that you want to meet when you play.

  • From The Space, every note I play

  • is the most beautiful sound I've ever heard.

  • That's sort of the musical version of enlightenment.

  • Every sound I play is the most beautiful sound

  • I've ever heard.

  • Now, it could be easy if it was something like this.

  • [PLAYING PIANO]

  • But if you're in that state of mind,

  • it doesn't matter what notes you play.

  • [PLAYING PIANO]

  • Every note I play is the most beautiful sound

  • I've ever heard.

  • And from The Space, that's where you go.

  • Instead of trying to make music, you

  • have this sense of receiving music.

  • And that's really great because it takes away

  • a lot of responsibility.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • For example, if I play a concert and someone comes up to me

  • and says, wow, man that really sucked.

  • I could say, well, don't blame me.

  • It wasn't me.

  • Talk to him.

  • And I think everybody knows about this.

  • The question is how to employ it when it's time to perform?

  • And, first, can I give everybody just a little taste

  • of what The Space is?

  • It's very easy to go there.

  • If you would, shut your eyes.

  • Now, all I'd like you to do is notice that you're breathing.

  • You don't have to exaggerate the breathing.

  • It's just like noticing the traffic outside.

  • You were breathing already, I'm sure of it.

  • Just notice it.

  • And if you have a thought, just notice that

  • and you just go back to your breathing.

  • We're going to do this for just a little bit.

  • And when you're ready, you could open your eyes.

  • Now, imagine playing from there or working from there.

  • That's what we work on.

  • [PLAYING PIANO]

  • So just imagine that, doing your work from there,

  • from The Space.

  • And that's how we work with students.

  • Actually, I wrote this book in 1996, "Effortless Mastery."

  • And it was kind of a phenomenon because it

  • was something I didn't care about

  • and didn't really intend to do, which is why it probably

  • came out so natural.

  • What happens is I started teaching.

  • The New School, someone called the New School in New York,

  • someone called me and said, hey, so-and-so

  • didn't show up this week-- today.

  • Would you want to take his course?

  • And I said, well, I'm sorry.

  • I'm not a teacher.

  • And he goes, it pays $150.

  • And I said, what time?

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • I mean this is when I could use it.

  • So I go in there.

  • And it's a test.

  • It's a midterm.

  • I say, oh, great.

  • I just have to sit here like a homeroom

  • teacher for an hour and a half and then go upstairs and pick

  • up my $150.

  • So they did it.

  • And they were all leaving.

  • And then the guy that asked me to come in said,

  • no, no, Kenny, I want you to show them some of your stuff.

  • And he's asking them all back.

  • And I said, Arnie, if it was me, I'd want to get out of here.

  • I just took a test.

  • And he said, no, no, shown some of your stuff,

  • show them some of your stuff.

  • So I looked at the test.

  • And the first question was, what is the first chord

  • to "Body and Soul."

  • Do you all know that song, or some of you know that song?

  • It's one of the great jazz standards.

  • So I said, well, all right, here's the first question.

  • What's the first chord to "Body and Soul" One of the guy's

  • raised his hand, and E-flat minor.

  • No, it's wrong.

  • That happens to be right.

  • Another guy said, A-flat sus because you

  • could use a-- no, wrong.

  • They came at it a few ways.

  • Finally, they were getting kind of angry.

  • You know, I mean the young musicians

  • can be quite opinionated.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • And they were kind of yelling at me.

  • And I don't know exactly where I'm going.

  • But I'm kind of enjoying that they're getting pissed off.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • So I said, OK, you ready for the answer?

  • Any chord could be the first chord of "Body and Soul."

  • And they all went, oh, that stuff.

  • Oh, yeah.

  • You must be a guy from the '70s.

  • Yeah Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • Yeah.

  • I said, well, let's try it.

  • A guy said C major, OK.

  • I went C major.

  • Then I went cycle of fifths.

  • I managed to get to the next chord.

  • Another guy said B major.

  • Whatever they said, I managed to get it

  • to the next chord or the cord after.

  • And accidentally, it was probably the best harmony

  • lesson they ever had

  • So what happened after that was I

  • was called to sub for everybody.

  • It was a jazz school and real jazz musicians.

  • And as with the tradition, at least