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  • (piano plays)

  • - All right, so we're at lesson three already!

  • Some pretty simple things again today.

  • Today we're actually, finally, gonna

  • get to the keyboard a little bit.

  • I'm gonna teach ya how to find notes on the keyboard.

  • Pretty simple, but we're getting into there.

  • As I said, the next couple lessons we'll finally

  • get playing examples on the keyboard.

  • So then it should start to get a little more

  • interesting if you're already familiar with

  • these very introductory subjects, and things like that.

  • Another thing I'm gonna explain are note durations,

  • which is how long to hold the notes:

  • quarter notes, half notes,

  • dotted half notes, things like that.

  • I'll have an explanation there for you.

  • One more thing we're going to talk about

  • is reading notes on and off the staff

  • and give you a little more experience reading notes.

  • Because that's very important!

  • That's probably something we'll

  • practice going on, as we move forward.

  • I'll probably make, maybe, some supplementary

  • videos about note-reading, as well,

  • just to give you a little more practice.

  • I'll also try to post a link somewhere to a site that gives

  • you some experience note-reading, so you don't

  • have to keep watching the videos over and over.

  • And you can actually go and learn on your own,

  • which I think is very important.

  • There you have it.

  • That's what we're gonna do in lesson three.

  • I hope you enjoy!

  • Okay, so we're finally at the keyboard,

  • or piano, or whatever you want to call it.

  • This thing here with the keys is known as the keyboard.

  • Some people happen to have a piano,

  • and I happen to have a professional keyboard.

  • The layout of the keyboard goes like this:

  • I'm sure you've noticed already that on the keyboard

  • there are white keys and there are black keys, of course.

  • And that the black keys go on a pattern

  • of group of two, group of three,

  • group of two, three, two, three, and then

  • it just keeps repeating all the way to the end.

  • So, knowing this, I'm going to show

  • you how to find the note "C."

  • How to find the note "C":

  • First you want to find a group of two black keys.

  • Here's one.

  • "C" is always going to be directly down

  • and to the left of your leftmost black key.

  • So here you go.

  • That one's gonna be "C."

  • Let's find another one.

  • The first thing, if you remember,

  • is to find a group of two black keys.

  • Here it is!

  • Remember, "C" is gonna be right to the bottom

  • and to the left of that group of two.

  • So there's your "C."

  • We're gonna go back to our first "C," which is here.

  • This "C" happens to be in the middle of the keyboard.

  • It's commonly referred to as "middle C."

  • If you know your musical alphabet,

  • you remember that the musical alphabet

  • goes from "A" to "G," and then goes on to "H"?

  • No, it repeats.

  • So we have "C."

  • What's after "C" in the alphabet?

  • "D," "E," "F," "G,"

  • and then "A," "B," "C,"

  • so if we take our "C," then,

  • what's right before "C" in the alphabet?

  • "B," "A."

  • So, if you ever get lost, you can always look for

  • the note "C" and count up or down from there.

  • That's why, I think, in the other video,

  • I told you to be able to read the

  • musical alphabet forwards and backwards.

  • Because that gives you a lot of practice

  • going from "C" to "D," "E," "F,"

  • and then back down, "E," "D," "C,"

  • "B," "A," so you can find notes a little bit quicker.

  • Another thing I recommend is to memorize

  • where the other notes are on the keyboard.

  • You can do that in their relation to the

  • groups of two and three black keys,

  • so you could say, "Okay, 'C' is to the left

  • "of that group of two black keys;

  • " 'D' is in the middle of that group of two;

  • " 'E' is to the right of that group of two;

  • " 'F' is directly below and to

  • "the left of the group of three;

  • " 'G' is in between the first two in that group of three;

  • " 'A,' " and so forth.

  • I think you get the idea.

  • So I recommend that, but if not, if all else fails

  • and you forget where the locations of these

  • other keys are, you should at least be able to find

  • the note "C" and count up or down from there

  • to be able to figure out where you are.

  • Okay, here, I have a couple different types of notes.

  • What these will tell you is how long to play the piano.

  • One thing I want to point out is that mostly every note has

  • what's called a "head," and a "stem."

  • The head is this thing here, and the stem

  • will either go up or down.

  • Sometimes you'll see the note like this,

  • depending on where the note is located on the staff.

  • The first one we have here,

  • this first example, is called the "quarter note."

  • The quarter note, you can tell, has a filled in head

  • with a straight stem coming off of it.

  • That one is going to get one beat,

  • or you might want to say one count.

  • You'll play the piano and count to one.

  • The next kind of note is known as the "half note."

  • A half note has an open head with a straight stem.

  • This one is going to get two beats, or two counts.

  • Then this third one we have here

  • is called the "dotted half note."

  • You can tell because it looks like

  • a regular half note with a dot attached.

  • This one is going to get three counts.

  • Here, last but not least, this one is a little

  • bit of an exception to the rule because

  • it just has a head with it and no stem.

  • When you see that, you know

  • that you are playing a whole note.

  • A whole note will get four counts.

  • If you remember before, we were talking about

  • the lines and spaces of the bass clef and how

  • to read notes on the staff, knowing the

  • lines and spaces for each of those clefs.

  • There's one little detail I wanted to point out

  • about that, that I feel is pretty important,

  • and that's when you put the lines and spaces together.

  • You'll have line, space, line, space,

  • so you're basically just lining them up.

  • The bottom line, as we know, is "E,"

  • and then "F," "G," "A," "B," "C."

  • You should've noticed something about this,

  • and it's when you put the lines and spaces together,

  • the letters will go in consecutive order,

  • of course, knowing that the

  • musical alphabet repeats after "G."

  • The same thing about the bass clef.

  • We have that bottom line we all know as "G."

  • And then begins, "A," "B," "C," "D."

  • So, when you put the lines and spaces together,

  • they will go in consecutive order.

  • I just wanted to point that out.

  • You may have noticed it, maybe not,

  • but I think it's worth pointing out.

  • Here is a brief explanation of this:

  • the use of ledger lines.

  • Ledger lines are for notes that don't fall on the staff.

  • They fall either directly above the staff

  • or directly below the staff.

  • So they add in these little lines, so you can

  • be able to, basically, tell where you

  • are in figuring out these notes.

  • Now, a rule of thumb, when you're trying

  • to figure these out, is to find the next nearest note.

  • Say I cover that up, and you're like, "Oh, gee,

  • "that falls outside of the staff, what do I do?"

  • Well, you find the next nearest note,

  • which you do know, and you probably

  • know the first line of the treble clef.

  • If you don't, that letter is "E."

  • So "E," and then what's right before "E" in the alphabet?

  • "D"; right before that?

  • "C," "B," and "A."

  • So this goes in consecutive order as well.

  • But, because you're going down,

  • it will be in backwards order, of course.

  • The same thing with the base clef.

  • We have these ledger lines.

  • So you're like "Oh man, I don't know what note that is.

  • "That's below the staff.

  • "I don't know that."

  • Well, find a note on the staff that you do know.

  • You know that first line, or you should, anyway.

  • That is, of course, gonna be "G."

  • Well, what's before "G" in the alphabet?

  • Of course, it's gonna be "F."

  • Before that is "E," "D," and "C."

  • Once again, it's important to point out,

  • because we're going down below

  • the staff, it will go in backwards order.

  • Let's get some practice with these.

  • Here we have some treble clef.

  • Let me move this out of the way.

  • Move it a little further out of the way.

  • There we go!

  • So, we have the treble clef!

  • We have that bottom line.

  • We know that as "E," of course, because

  • it's "Every Good Bunny Deserves Fudge."

  • So "E," bottom line.

  • Now, we have this below it.

  • "Oh no, what is that note?

  • "It's below the staff!"

  • Well, remember, this is is "E."

  • This is right directly below "E,"

  • so that's going to be?

  • That's right, "D."

  • Hopefully you said "D," anyway.

  • Knowing that that's "D," what's this one?

  • Take a second to think about it, maybe.

  • That's right, "C."

  • Excellent!

  • Good work!

  • Okay!

  • Moving on, knowing that that's "C,"

  • first thing I want to mention about this:

  • I want you to memorize this one.

  • Only because this, specifically, is middle C,

  • and you will be seeing this note quite a lot

  • in the next couple of exercises we're gonna do.

  • And in the first couple of exercises, really,

  • any piano student comes across.

  • So it's really important to know that's middle C.

  • What's the next one down?

  • Let's see.

  • Oh, that's right below it, I'd say!

  • Because there's the ledger line.

  • This one's right below it.

  • What's before "C" in the alphabet?

  • If you said "B," you are right on the money!

  • There you go!

  • All right! (chuckles)

  • Falling all over the place today!

  • Okay!

  • I'm gonna move that out of the way.

  • Now we're gonna have a little experience doing notes

  • that are directly above the staff on the treble clef.

  • So I put this one out here for you.

  • Hopefully, don't panic!

  • You can get this!

  • If you know, remember that this

  • is right outside of the staff.

  • And this is, remember that top line;

  • that probably should be the closest

  • one that you know, at this point.

  • And, of course, you know that

  • the top line would be "F."

  • So if I had a note there, that would be "F."

  • What's right after "F" in the alphabet?

  • "G," of course!

  • There we go!

  • That's one's out of the way.

  • Knowing that this is "G," we have the next one!

  • So "G," and "A;" yep!

  • "A" is the next one.

  • Then