Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • I am British.

    私はイギリス人です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • Never before has the phrase "I am British" elicited so much pity.

    "私はイギリス人 "というフレーズがこれほどまでに同情を誘ったことはありませんでした。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I come from an island where many of us like to believe

    私は多くの人が信じたがる島から来ました

  • there's been a lot of continuity over the last thousand years.

    1000年以上の連続性があるからな

  • We tend to have historically imposed change on others

    私たちは歴史的に他人に変化を押し付けてきた傾向があります。

  • but done much less of it ourselves.

    しかし、私たちはそれをはるかに少なくしてきました。

  • So it came as an immense shock to me

    だから、私にとっては大きな衝撃だった。

  • when I woke up on the morning of June 24

    6月24日の朝起きたら

  • to discover that my country had voted to leave the European Union,

    私の国が欧州連合(EU)離脱に投票したことを発見しました。

  • my Prime Minister had resigned,

    私の首相は辞任していました。

  • and Scotland was considering a referendum

    とスコットランドは国民投票を検討していた

  • that could bring to an end the very existence of the United Kingdom.

    イギリスの存在そのものを 終わらせる可能性があります

  • So that was an immense shock for me,

    だから、それは私にとって大きなショックでした。

  • and it was an immense shock for many people,

    と多くの人に衝撃を与えました。

  • but it was also something that, over the following several days,

    というようなこともありましたが、その後の数日の間に

  • created a complete political meltdown

    政界崩壊

  • in my country.

    私の国では

  • There were calls for a second referendum,

    再度の国民投票を求める声があった。

  • almost as if, following a sports match,

    ほとんどスポーツの試合の後のように

  • we could ask the opposition for a replay.

    野党にリプレイを要求してもいいんじゃないかな。

  • Everybody was blaming everybody else.

    みんながみんなのせいにしていました。

  • People blamed the Prime Minister

    人々は首相を非難した

  • for calling the referendum in the first place.

    そもそも国民投票を招集したことについて

  • They blamed the leader of the opposition for not fighting it hard enough.

    ろくに戦っていないことを野党のリーダーのせいにしていた。

  • The young accused the old.

    若者が老人を非難した。

  • The educated blamed the less well-educated.

    高学歴者は高学歴でない者を責めた。

  • That complete meltdown was made even worse

    その完全なメルトダウンはさらに悪化させた

  • by the most tragic element of it:

    その中でも最も悲劇的な要素によって。

  • levels of xenophobia and racist abuse in the streets of Britain

    イギリスの街頭での外国人恐怖症と人種差別的虐待のレベル

  • at a level that I have never seen before

    見たこともないレベルで

  • in my lifetime.

    生前に

  • People are now talking about whether my country is becoming a Little England,

    私の国がリトルイングランドになりつつあるかどうかが話題になっています。

  • or, as one of my colleagues put it,

    同僚の一人が言うには

  • whether we're about to become a 1950s nostalgia theme park

    1950年代ノスタルジックなテーマパークになりそうかどうか

  • floating in the Atlantic Ocean.

    大西洋に浮かぶ

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But my question is really,

    しかし、私の質問は本当に

  • should we have the degree of shock that we've experienced since?

    あれからの衝撃の度合いはどうなんでしょうか?

  • Was it something that took place overnight?

    一夜にして何かあったのでしょうか?

  • Or are there deeper structural factors that have led us to where we are today?

    それとも、今の私たちの居場所につながっている深い構造的な要因があるのでしょうか。

  • So I want to take a step back and ask two very basic questions.

    そこで一歩引いて、とても基本的な質問を2つしてみたいと思います。

  • First, what does Brexit represent,

    まず、Brexitは何を表しているのか。

  • not just for my country,

    国のためだけではなく

  • but for all of us around the world?

    でも世界中の私たちにとっては?

  • And second, what can we do about it?

    第二に、どうすればいいのか?

  • How should we all respond?

    みんなでどう対応すべきか?

  • So first, what does Brexit represent?

    ではまず、Brexitは何を意味するのか?

  • Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

    後知恵とは素晴らしいものです。

  • Brexit teaches us many things about our society

    Brexitは私たちの社会について多くのことを教えてくれます。

  • and about societies around the world.

    と世界の社会について。

  • It highlights in ways that we seem embarrassingly unaware of

    私たちが恥ずかしくて気がつかないように見える方法で、それは強調されています。

  • how divided our societies are.

    私たちの社会がいかに分断されているか。

  • The vote split along lines of age, education, class and geography.

    年齢、学歴、階級、地理に沿って票が分かれた。

  • Young people didn't turn out to vote in great numbers,

    若者の投票率は大して高くなかった。

  • but those that did wanted to remain.

    しかし、残った者は残りたいと思っていた。

  • Older people really wanted to leave the European Union.

    年配の方は本当に欧州連合を離れたかったんですね。

  • Geographically, it was London and Scotland that most strongly committed

    地理的に、最も強くコミットしたのはロンドンとスコットランドでした。

  • to being part of the European Union,

    欧州連合の一員であることに

  • while in other parts of the country there was very strong ambivalence.

    他の地域では非常に強いアンビバレンスがありました。

  • Those divisions are things we really need to recognize and take seriously.

    これらの部門は、私たちが本当に認識し、真剣に取り組まなければならないことです。

  • But more profoundly, the vote teaches us something

    しかし、もっと深いところでは、投票は私たちに何かを教えてくれます。

  • about the nature of politics today.

    今日の政治のあり方について

  • Contemporary politics is no longer just about right and left.

    現代の政治は、もはや右か左かだけではない。

  • It's no longer just about tax and spend.

    もはや税金や経費だけの問題ではありません。

  • It's about globalization.

    グローバル化の話です。

  • The fault line of contemporary politics is between those that embrace globalization

    現代政治の断層は、グローバル化を受け入れる者と受け入れない者の間にある

  • and those that fear globalization.

    とグローバル化を恐れる人たち。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • If we look at why those who wanted to leave --

    なぜ、なぜ出て行きたいと思った人がいたのかを考えてみると......。

  • we call them "Leavers," as opposed to "Remainers" --

    私たちは彼らを「離脱者」と呼んでいますが、「残留者」とは対照的です。

  • we see two factors in the opinion polls

    世論調査には二つの要因がある

  • that really mattered.

    それは本当に重要なことでした。

  • The first was immigration, and the second sovereignty,

    1つ目は移民、2つ目は主権。

  • and these represent a desire for people to take back control of their own lives

    そしてこれらは、人々が自分の人生のコントロールを取り戻すことを望んでいることを表しています。

  • and the feeling that they are unrepresented by politicians.

    と、政治家からの不届き感を感じています。

  • But those ideas are ones that signify fear and alienation.

    しかし、それらの考えは、恐怖と疎外感を意味するものです。

  • They represent a retreat back towards nationalism and borders

    彼らは、ナショナリズムと国境への後退を表しています。

  • in ways that many of us would reject.

    私たちの多くが拒絶するような方法で

  • What I want to suggest is the picture is more complicated than that,

    私が提案したいのは、それ以上に絵が複雑だということです。

  • that liberal internationalists,

    そのリベラルな国際派。

  • like myself, and I firmly include myself in that picture,

    自分が好きで、その中にしっかりと自分を入れています。

  • need to write ourselves back into the picture

    書き直さなければならない

  • in order to understand how we've got to where we are today.

    今の自分たちがどのようにして今の場所にたどり着いたのかを理解するために。

  • When we look at the voting patterns across the United Kingdom,

    イギリス全土の投票パターンを見てみると

  • we can visibly see the divisions.

    私たちは目に見える形で部門を見ることができます。

  • The blue areas show Remain

    青色の部分はRemainを示しています。

  • and the red areas Leave.

    と赤い部分を残します。

  • When I looked at this,

    これを見ていると

  • what personally struck me was the very little time in my life

    個人的に印象的だったのは、私の人生の中でほとんど時間がなかったことです。

  • I've actually spent in many of the red areas.

    実際に多くの赤い地域で過ごしてきました。

  • I suddenly realized that, looking at the top 50 areas in the UK

    ふと気がついたのですが、イギリスのトップ50のエリアを見てみると

  • that have the strongest Leave vote,

    リーブ票が最も強い

  • I've spent a combined total of four days of my life in those areas.

    私はそれらの分野で合計4日間の人生を過ごしてきました。

  • In some of those places,

    その中のいくつかの場所で

  • I didn't even know the names of the voting districts.

    投票区の名前も知らなかった。

  • It was a real shock to me,

    本当にショックでした。

  • and it suggested that people like me

    私のような人がいることを示唆している

  • who think of ourselves as inclusive, open and tolerant,

    私たちは、自分たちのことを包括的で、オープンで、寛容であると考えています。

  • perhaps don't know our own countries and societies

    自国を知らない

  • nearly as well as we like to believe.

    私たちが信じたいのと同じくらい

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • And the challenge that comes from that is we need to find a new way

    そして、そこから生まれる課題は、新しい方法を見つける必要があるということです。

  • to narrate globalization to those people,

    その人たちにグローバル化を語りかけるために

  • to recognize that for those people who have not necessarily been to university,

    必ずしも大学に行っていない人たちのために、そのことを認識するために。

  • who haven't necessarily grown up with the Internet,

    必ずしもインターネットで成長していない人は

  • that don't get opportunities to travel,

    旅行の機会を得られない

  • they may be unpersuaded by the narrative that we find persuasive

    説得力のない話になるかもしれない

  • in our often liberal bubbles.

    私たちのリベラルな泡の中で

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • It means that we need to reach out more broadly and understand.

    より広く手を差し伸べて理解する必要があるということです。

  • In the Leave vote, a minority have peddled the politics of fear and hatred,

    離脱票では、少数派が恐怖と憎悪の政治を売り物にしてきた。

  • creating lies and mistrust

    虚心坦懐

  • around, for instance, the idea that the vote on Europe

    例えば、欧州の投票をめぐって

  • could reduce the number of refugees and asylum-seekers coming to Europe,

    ヨーロッパに来る難民や亡命者の数を減らすことができるかもしれない。

  • when the vote on leaving had nothing to do with immigration

    移民と離脱が無関係なのに

  • from outside the European Union.

    欧州連合外からの

  • But for a significant majority of the Leave voters

    しかし、離脱派の有権者のかなりの大多数にとっては

  • the concern was disillusionment with the political establishment.

    懸念されていたのは、政治体制への幻滅であった。

  • This was a protest vote for many,

    これは多くの人の抗議投票でした。

  • a sense that nobody represented them,

    誰も彼らを代表していないという感覚。

  • that they couldn't find a political party that spoke for them,

    自分たちを代弁してくれる政党が見つからなかったと。

  • and so they rejected that political establishment.

    だから、彼らはその政治的確立を拒絶したのです。

  • This replicates around Europe and much of the liberal democratic world.

    これは、ヨーロッパや自由民主主義世界の多くの地域で再現されています。

  • We see it with the rise in popularity of Donald Trump in the United States,

    アメリカでのドナルド・トランプの人気上昇でそれを見ています。

  • with the growing nationalism of Viktor Orbán in Hungary,

    ハンガリーのビクトル・オルバンのナショナリズムの高まりに伴い

  • with the increase in popularity of Marine Le Pen in France.

    フランスでのマリーン・ル・ペンの人気上昇に伴い

  • The specter of Brexit is in all of our societies.

    Brexitの亡霊は、私たちの社会のすべてに存在しています。

  • So the question I think we need to ask is my second question,

    そこで質問したいのが、私の2つ目の質問です。

  • which is how should we collectively respond?

    ということは、集団でどのように対応していくべきなのでしょうか?

  • For all of us who care about creating liberal, open, tolerant societies,

    リベラルでオープンで寛容な社会を作ることにこだわるすべての人のために。

  • we urgently need a new vision,

    新しいビジョンが緊急に必要です

  • a vision of a more tolerant, inclusive globalization,

    より寛容で包摂的なグローバル化のビジョン。

  • one that brings people with us rather than leaving them behind.

    人を置き去りにするのではなく、人を連れていくもの。

  • That vision of globalization

    そのグローバル化のビジョン

  • is one that has to start by a recognition of the positive benefits of globalization.

    は、グローバル化の肯定的な利点を認識することから始めなければならないものである。

  • The consensus amongst economists

    経済学者のコンセンサス

  • is that free trade, the movement of capital,

    それは自由貿易、資本の移動です。

  • the movement of people across borders

    国境を越えた人の移動

  • benefit everyone on aggregate.

    集計してみんなの利益になる。

  • The consensus amongst international relations scholars

    国際関係学者のコンセンサス

  • is that globalization brings interdependence,

    は、グローバル化が相互依存をもたらすということです。

  • which brings cooperation and peace.

    協力と平和をもたらす

  • But globalization also has redistributive effects.

    しかし、グローバル化には再分配的な効果もある。

  • It creates winners and losers.

    それが勝者と敗者を生み出す。

  • To take the example of migration,

    移住を例に挙げると

  • we know that immigration is a net positive for the economy as a whole

    移民は経済全体にプラスになる

  • under almost all circumstances.

    ほとんどすべての状況下で

  • But we also have to be very aware

    しかし、私たちはまた、非常に意識しなければなりません。

  • that there are redistributive consequences,

    再分配的な結果があることを

  • that importantly, low-skilled immigration

    それよりも

  • can lead to a reduction in wages for the most impoverished in our societies

    社会で最も困窮している人の賃金を下げることになる。

  • and also put pressure on house prices.

    と住宅価格を圧迫しています。

  • That doesn't detract from the fact that it's positive,

    だからといってポジティブであることを否定するわけではありません。

  • but it means more people have to share in those benefits

    しかし、それはより多くの人がその利益を共有しなければならないことを意味します。

  • and recognize them.

    と認識します。

  • In 2002, the former Secretary-General of the United Nations, Kofi Annan,

    2002年、元国連事務総長のコフィ・アナン氏。

  • gave a speech at Yale University,

    がイェール大学でスピーチをしました。

  • and that speech was on the topic of inclusive globalization.

    と、インクルーシブ・グローバリゼーションをテーマにしたスピーチをしていました。

  • That was the speech in which he coined that term.

    その造語を使った演説でした。

  • And he said, and I paraphrase,

    と彼は言った、と私は言い換えた。

  • "The glass house of globalization has to be open to all

    "グローバル化のガラスの家 "は誰にでも開かれていなければならない

  • if it is to remain secure.

    それが安全であり続けるためには

  • Bigotry and ignorance

    偏見と無知

  • are the ugly face of exclusionary and antagonistic globalization."

    は、排外的で拮抗的なグローバリゼーションの醜い顔である。"

  • That idea of inclusive globalization was briefly revived in 2008

    インクルーシブ・グローバリゼーションという考え方は、2008年に一時的に復活した。