Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • What I'm going to show you

    皆さんにお見せするのは

  • are the astonishing molecular machines

    人体の生体組織を造っている

  • that create the living fabric of your body.

    驚くべき分子マシンです

  • Now molecules are really, really tiny.

    分子は非常に非常に小さいのです

  • And by tiny,

    本当に

  • I mean really.

    かなり小さいのです

  • They're smaller than a wavelength of light,

    光の波長より小さいので

  • so we have no way to directly observe them.

    直接見ることはできません

  • But through science, we do have a fairly good idea

    でも科学のおかげで小さな分子の世界で

  • of what's going on down at the molecular scale.

    何が起きているのか かなり分かっています

  • So what we can do is actually tell you about the molecules,

    しかし分子についてお話する事はできても

  • but we don't really have a direct way of showing you the molecules.

    お見せする直接の方法はありません

  • One way around this is to draw pictures.

    見えないものを 絵で表現するという方法は

  • And this idea is actually nothing new.

    決して目新しいものではありません

  • Scientists have always created pictures

    科学者達はこれまでも

  • as part of their thinking and discovery process.

    考えや発見の段階で絵を使ってきました

  • They draw pictures of what they're observing with their eyes,

    望遠鏡や顕微鏡を覗いて見た事や

  • through technology like telescopes and microscopes,

    頭の中で考えている事を

  • and also what they're thinking about in their minds.

    絵に描きました

  • I picked two well-known examples,

    アートで科学を表現する

  • because they're very well-known for expressing science through art.

    という点で有名な2つの例をご紹介します

  • And I start with Galileo

    まずはガリレオ

  • who used the world's first telescope

    世界初の望遠鏡で

  • to look at the Moon.

    月をみた人物ですよね

  • And he transformed our understanding of the Moon.

    月の知識を一変させました

  • The perception in the 17th century

    17世紀当時 月は完璧な

  • was the Moon was a perfect heavenly sphere.

    美しい球体だとされていましたが

  • But what Galileo saw was a rocky, barren world,

    ガリレオが見たのはゴツゴツした不毛なもので

  • which he expressed through his watercolor painting.

    彼はそれを水彩画で表現しました

  • Another scientist with very big ideas,

    もう一人は チャールズ・ダーウィンです

  • the superstar of biology, is Charles Darwin.

    壮大な考えを持っていた生物学界のスターです

  • And with this famous entry in his notebook,

    この有名なスケッチの左上には

  • he begins in the top left-hand corner with, "I think,"

    「私の考えでは」とありそれから

  • and then sketches out the first tree of life,

    最初の生命の樹が描かれています

  • which is his perception

    地球上の全生物が

  • of how all the species, all living things on Earth,

    進化過程でどう繋がっているか

  • are connected through evolutionary history --

    という彼の説を表しています

  • the origin of species through natural selection

    祖先からの多様化と

  • and divergence from an ancestral population.

    自然淘汰による生物種の起源が表現されています

  • Even as a scientist,

    ところで 科学者の私でさえ

  • I used to go to lectures by molecular biologists

    分子生物学の講義を受けては

  • and find them completely incomprehensible,

    研究の説明に専門用語や特殊用語が頻出し

  • with all the fancy technical language and jargon

    内容が全く理解できない

  • that they would use in describing their work,

    と感じることが よくありました

  • until I encountered the artworks of David Goodsell,

    そんな時分子生物学者デイヴィッド・グッドセルの

  • who is a molecular biologist at the Scripps Institute.

    美術作品に出会いました

  • And his pictures,

    彼の絵は 構造も縮尺も

  • everything's accurate and it's all to scale.

    正確に表現されています

  • And his work illuminated for me

    体内の分子世界がどうなっているのかが

  • what the molecular world inside us is like.

    彼の作品では理解できました

  • So this is a transection through blood.

    例えば 血液の断面図です

  • In the top left-hand corner, you've got this yellow-green area.

    左上の端の黄緑色のエリアがありますね

  • The yellow-green area is the fluids of blood, which is mostly water,

    これは血液の流体でほとんどが水ですが

  • but it's also antibodies, sugars,

    免疫体 糖 ホルモン等を

  • hormones, that kind of thing.

    含んでいます

  • And the red region is a slice into a red blood cell.

    赤色の所は赤血球の断面で

  • And those red molecules are hemoglobin.

    赤い分子はヘモグロビンです

  • They are actually red; that's what gives blood its color.

    血液が赤いのはこのためです

  • And hemoglobin acts as a molecular sponge

    ヘモグロビンは分子のスポンジの役割をし

  • to soak up the oxygen in your lungs

    酸素を肺で吸収し

  • and then carry it to other parts of the body.

    体全体に運びます

  • I was very much inspired by this image many years ago,

    私は何年も前に この絵に刺激され

  • and I wondered whether we could use computer graphics

    コンピューターグラフィックを用いて

  • to represent the molecular world.

    分子の世界を表現できないか考えました

  • What would it look like?

    どう見えるだろうなぁって

  • And that's how I really began. So let's begin.

    そこから始めたんです ではいきますよ

  • This is DNA in its classic double helix form.

    ご存知の2重螺旋のDNA

  • And it's from X-ray crystallography,

    こちらX線解析によるもので

  • so it's an accurate model of DNA.

    正確なDNAのモデルです

  • If we unwind the double helix and unzip the two strands,

    螺旋をばらして2つの鎖を解くと

  • you see these things that look like teeth.

    歯のようなものが現れます

  • Those are the letters of genetic code,

    これは遺伝子コードの文字列で

  • the 25,000 genes you've got written in your DNA.

    25,000のヒトの遺伝子をDNA上に書いています

  • This is what they typically talk about --

    遺伝子コードってよく耳にしますね

  • the genetic code -- this is what they're talking about.

    ご覧のこれがまさにそれなんです

  • But I want to talk about a different aspect of DNA science,

    ここではDNA科学の違った側面_

  • and that is the physical nature of DNA.

    DNAの物理的な性質をお話します

  • It's these two strands that run in opposite directions

    これは逆向きに並んでいる2本の鎖です

  • for reasons I can't go into right now.

    細かい理由は省きますが

  • But they physically run in opposite directions,

    鎖の方向性が逆になっているため

  • which creates a number of complications for your living cells,

    私たちの細胞にとって不便なことが起こります

  • as you're about to see,

    ご覧になればわかりますが

  • most particularly when DNA is being copied.

    特にDNAの複写時に面倒なことが起こります

  • And so what I'm about to show you

    次の画像は 今まさに

  • is an accurate representation

    皆さんの体内でも活動している

  • of the actual DNA replication machine that's occurring right now inside your body,

    DNA複製機の正確なモデルです

  • at least 2002 biology.

    2002年時点の生物学ですが

  • So DNA's entering the production line from the left-hand side,

    DNAが左側から生産ラインに入って行き、

  • and it hits this collection, these miniature biochemical machines,

    二本のDNAをバラバラにし 全く同じコピーを作る

  • that are pulling apart the DNA strand and making an exact copy.

    超小型 生物化学装置に達します

  • So DNA comes in

    DNAが入ってきて

  • and hits this blue, doughnut-shaped structure

    ドーナツ型の青い部分にあたると

  • and it's ripped apart into its two strands.

    鎖は2本に引き裂かれます

  • One strand can be copied directly,

    片方の鎖は直接複写され

  • and you can see these things spooling off to the bottom there.

    下の方へ巻き落ちて行きますが

  • But things aren't so simple for the other strand

    もう片方の鎖では そう単純にはいきません

  • because it must be copied backwards.

    前後逆に複製する必要があるからです

  • So it's thrown out repeatedly in these loops

    繰り返し この様なループにされ

  • and copied one section at a time,

    一部ごと複写されて

  • creating two new DNA molecules.

    2セットの二本鎖DNA分子が造られます

  • Now you have billions of this machine

    今こうしている間もあなたの体内で

  • right now working away inside you,

    何十億個ものこの機械が活動し

  • copying your DNA with exquisite fidelity.

    精巧かつ完全な複製を作っています

  • It's an accurate representation,

    正確に表現できています

  • and it's pretty much at the correct speed for what is occurring inside you.

    複写速度も ほぼこの速さです

  • I've left out error correction and a bunch of other things.

    ここでは エラー修正や他の様々なことは省略しています

  • This was work from a number of years ago.

    ここまでは数年前の作品です

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます

  • This is work from a number of years ago,

    これは随分前のものでしたが 今からお見せするのは

  • but what I'll show you next is updated science, it's updated technology.

    新しい科学知識を さらに進んだ技術で表現したものです

  • So again, we begin with DNA.

    今回も DNAから始めましょう

  • And it's jiggling and wiggling there because of the surrounding soup of molecules,

    通常は分子を含んだ液体の中で振動していますが

  • which I've stripped away so you can see something.

    見やすいように液体を取り除きました

  • DNA is about two nanometers across,

    DNAの幅は約2ナノメートルで

  • which is really quite tiny.

    とても小さいのですが

  • But in each one of your cells,

    私たちの細胞内のDNAは

  • each strand of DNA is about 30 to 40 million nanometers long.

    3千から4千ナノメートルの長さがあります

  • So to keep the DNA organized and regulate access to the genetic code,

    DNAをまとめ 遺伝子コードへのアクセスを制限するために

  • it's wrapped around these purple proteins --

    タンパク質が周りを包んでいます

  • or I've labeled them purple here.

    ここでは紫色で現されています

  • It's packaged up and bundled up.

    包まれて束ねられています

  • All this field of view is a single strand of DNA.

    画面全体に広がるのはたった1本のDNAなんですよ

  • This huge package of DNA is called a chromosome.

    この巨大なDNAの包みが染色体です

  • And we'll come back to chromosomes in a minute.

    染色体については後でお話しするとして

  • We're pulling out, we're zooming out,

    ズームアウトして

  • out through a nuclear pore,

    全DNAを含む

  • which is the gateway to this compartment that holds all the DNA

    細胞核という所から 核膜孔を抜けて

  • called the nucleus.

    出て見ましょう

  • All of this field of view

    ちなみに映っているものは

  • is about a semester's worth of biology, and I've got seven minutes.

    生物のクラス 一学期分に値しますが 7分しかないので

  • So we're not going to be able to do that today?

    今日は全部お話できませんね?

  • No, I'm being told, "No."

    「駄目」だそうです

  • This is the way a living cell looks down a light microscope.

    光学顕微鏡で覗くと細胞はこう見えます

  • And it's been filmed under time-lapse, which is why you can see it moving.

    低速度撮影のため動くのが見えています

  • The nuclear envelope breaks down.

    核膜が破れました

  • These sausage-shaped things are the chromosomes, and we'll focus on them.

    ソーセージのような形のが染色体で ここを中心に見ていきます

  • They go through this very striking motion

    染色体が著しい動きをしている

  • that is focused on these little red spots.

    箇所が赤い部分に集中しています

  • When the cell feels it's ready to go,

    細胞分裂の準備が整うと

  • it rips apart the chromosome.

    染色体は2つに分かれ

  • One set of DNA goes to one side,

    一組のDNAセットは一方へ

  • the other side gets the other set of DNA --

    もう一組は他方へ行きます

  • identical copies of DNA.

    複製した全く同じDNAです

  • And then the cell splits down the middle.

    そして細胞が真ん中で分離します

  • And again, you have billions of cells

    繰り返しますが今も体内では

  • undergoing this process right now inside of you.

    何十億という細胞がこうして分裂しています

  • Now we're going to rewind and just focus on the chromosomes

    では少し巻き戻して 染色体だけに着目して

  • and look at its structure and describe it.

    構造を見て 解説しましょう

  • So again, here we are at that equator moment.

    分裂の瞬間に戻ってきました

  • The chromosomes line up.

    染色体が並んでいます

  • And if we isolate just one chromosome,

    1つの染色体を取り出して

  • we're going to pull it out and have a look at its structure.

    構造を見てみましょう

  • So this is one of the biggest molecular structures that you have,

    これは現在の生物学上 体内で

  • at least as far as we've discovered so far inside of us.

    最も大きい分子構造の1つです

  • So this is a single chromosome.

    これが1つの染色体で

  • And you have two strands of DNA in each chromosome.

    分裂期の染色体には2つのDNAの鎖が入っています

  • One is bundled up into one sausage.

    一方は1つのソーセージに

  • The other strand is bundled up into the other sausage.

    他方は別のに束ねられています

  • These things that look like whiskers that are sticking out from either side

    ひげのような物が両側に突き出しているのが見えますね

  • are the dynamic scaffolding of the cell.

    ここは微小管といいます 細胞分裂の足場になります

  • They're called mircrotubules. That name's not important.

    名前は重要ではありません

  • But what we're going to focus on is this red region -- I've labeled it red here --

    赤く色付けられた所に注目しましょう

  • and it's the interface

    ここは 伸び縮みする足場と

  • between the dynamic scaffolding and the chromosomes.

    染色体の結合部です

  • It is obviously central to the movement of the chromosomes.

    明らかに 染色体の動きの中枢です

  • We have no idea really as to how it's achieving that movement.

    この動きの仕組みは はっきり解っていません

  • We've been studying this thing they call the kinetochore

    これは動原体と呼ばれて かなり綿密に

  • for over a hundred years with intense study,

    100年以上研究されてきましたが

  • and we're still just beginning to discover what it's all about.

    その働きが やっと少しずつ解ってきたところです

  • It is made up of about 200 different types of proteins,

    合計数千個にも及ぶ約200種類もの

  • thousands of proteins in total.

    タンパク質から出来ています

  • It is a signal broadcasting system.

    動原体は 信号伝達のシステムです

  • It broadcasts through chemical signals

    全てが揃って準備ができると

  • telling the rest of the cell when it's ready,

    細胞の他の部分に

  • when it feels that everything is aligned and ready to go

    染色体が切り離せる状態であることを

  • for the separation of the chromosomes.

    化学的な信号で知らせます

  • It is able to couple onto the growing and shrinking microtubules.

    動原体は伸縮する微小管に結合する働きもします

  • It's involved with the growing of the microtubules,

    それは微小管を伸ばすと同時に

  • and it's able to transiently couple onto them.

    一時的に結合することも出来ます

  • It's also an attention sensing system.

    これは検知システムでもあり

  • It's able to feel when the cell is ready,

    細胞が準備できた時や染色体が

  • when the chromosome is correctly positioned.

    正しく並べられた時が分かります

  • It's turning green here

    全てが準備できると

  • because it feels that everything is just right.

    ここが緑色に変わります

  • And you'll see, there's this one little last bit

    ここに 小さく1つだけ

  • that's still remaining red.

    赤色のままのものが あります

  • And it's walked away down the microtubules.

    赤色部分は微小管を歩いて離れていきます

  • That is the signal broadcasting system sending out the stop signal.

    これは伝達システムが「停止」の信号を送っているのです

  • And it's walked away. I mean, it's that mechanical.

    歩いて離れる まさに機械的な動作です

  • It's molecular clockwork.

    細かく正確な動きです

  • This is how you work at the molecular scale.

    このように分子の世界は動いています

  • So with a little bit of molecular eye candy,

    ちょっと見た目が面白い分子に

  • we've got kinesins, which are the orange ones.

    オレンジ色のキネシンがあります

  • They're little molecular courier molecules walking one way.

    小さな分子の運び屋で左に進んでいます

  • And here are the dynein. They're carrying that broadcasting system.

    これはダイニンで 伝達システムを担っています

  • And they've got their long legs so they can step around obstacles and so on.

    ダイニンは長い脚で障害物をかわしたりします

  • So again, this is all derived accurately

    これは科学から得られた情報を

  • from the science.

    正確に画像としたもので

  • The problem is we can't show it to you any other way.

    視覚的に説明する唯一の方法です 他の方法では見ることができません

  • Exploring at the frontier of science,

    最先端の科学や 最先端の

  • at the frontier of human understanding,

    人類の知識を探求することは

  • is mind-blowing.

    強烈で刺激的なものです

  • Discovering this stuff

    このような発見が

  • is certainly a pleasurable incentive to work in science.

    科学者の原動力になっていることは確かです

  • But most medical researchers --

    しかし 殆どの医療研究者にとって

  • discovering the stuff

    このような発見をすることは

  • is simply steps along the path to the big goals,

    大きな目標への通過点でしかありません

  • which are to eradicate disease,

    大きな目標は病気を撲滅し

  • to eliminate the suffering and the misery that disease causes

    病気からの苦しみや悲しみをなくし

  • and to lift people out of poverty.

    貧困をなくす事です

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございました

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

What I'm going to show you

皆さんにお見せするのは

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級 日本語 TED dna 染色 分子 細胞 生物

TED】ドリュー・ベリー。見られない生物学のアニメーション (Drew Berry: Animations of unseeable biology) (【TED】Drew Berry: Animations of unseeable biology (Drew Berry: Animations of unseeable biology))

  • 567 58
    何志豐 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語