Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Sheryl Shade: Hi, Aimee. Aimee Mullins: Hi.

    シェリル: 今日はエイミーと-- ハイ エイミー。 エイミー・マリンズ:ハイ

  • SS: Aimee and I thought we'd just talk a little bit,

    シェリル:エイミーと一緒に少し話そうと思って

  • and I wanted her to tell all of you what makes her a distinctive athlete.

    なぜエイミーがアスリートとしてこんなに注目されているのか教えてくれるかしら

  • AM: Well, for those of you who have seen the picture in the little bio --

    エイミー:ええと、私の経歴の写真を見た人は

  • it might have given it away --

    もう知っているかもしれないわね

  • I'm a double amputee, and I was born without fibulas in both legs.

    私は両脚切断者で 両脚の腓骨を持たずに生まれました

  • I was amputated at age one,

    1歳の時に両脚を切断されたけど

  • and I've been running like hell ever since, all over the place.

    私はずっと色んな所を走り回ってたわ

  • SS: Well, why don't you tell them how you got to Georgetown -- why don't we start there?

    シェリル:では、ジョージタウン大学へ行った経緯を、皆に話してくれる?

  • Why don't we start there?

    そこから話を始めない?

  • AM: I'm a senior in Georgetown in the Foreign Service program.

    エイミー:私は、ジョージタウン大学の外務プログラムの4年生です

  • I won a full academic scholarship out of high school.

    高校生のとき、大学の全授業料の奨学金を得ました

  • They pick three students out of the nation every year

    ジョージタウン大学は、国際情勢に関わらせる為に

  • to get involved in international affairs,

    毎年全米から3人の生徒を選ぶんだけど

  • and so I won a full ride to Georgetown

    私は、その一人としてジョージタウン大学へ行く事になったの

  • and I've been there for four years. Love it.

    それから4年間通い続けています すごく楽しいわ

  • SS: When Aimee got there,

    シェリル:エイミーが大学に通い始めた時

  • she decided that she's, kind of, curious about track and field,

    陸上競技に興味を持って

  • so she decided to call someone and start asking about it.

    誰かに電話して相談しようと思ったのよね

  • So, why don't you tell that story?

    その話をしてくれる?

  • AM: Yeah. Well, I guess I've always been involved in sports.

    エイミー:そうね。ええと、スポーツはずっと好きでやってたかな

  • I played softball for five years growing up.

    子供の頃は5年間ソフトボールをして

  • I skied competitively throughout high school,

    高校生の頃はずっと競技スキーをしてたけど

  • and I got a little restless in college

    大学では、1-2年間は特にスポーツをしてなくて

  • because I wasn't doing anything for about a year or two sports-wise.

    ちょっと身体がなまってきたの

  • And I'd never competed on a disabled level, you know --

    ただ、障害者の競技に参加したことはなかったの

  • I'd always competed against other able-bodied athletes.

    いつも健常者のスポーツ選手と競争していたし

  • That's all I'd ever known.

    それしか知らなかったの

  • In fact, I'd never even met another amputee until I was 17.

    実際、17歳まで他の両脚切断患者に会ったことがなかったわ

  • And I heard that they do these track meets with all disabled runners,

    それで 障害者の陸上競技会があると聞いたとき

  • and I figured, "Oh, I don't know about this,

    「いや、それはどうかな」 と思ったのね

  • but before I judge it, let me go see what it's all about."

    でも、どうするか決める前に、どんなものか参加して見てみようと思ったの

  • So, I booked myself a flight to Boston in '95, 19 years old

    そこで、ボストン行きの飛行機の予約をしたわ 95年で、19歳の時よ

  • and definitely the dark horse candidate at this race. I'd never done it before.

    競技会では 私は確実にダークホースだったわ 今まで参加した事なかったし

  • I went out on a gravel track a couple of weeks before this meet

    その数週間前、どこまで走れるか見てみるために

  • to see how far I could run,

    砂利のトラックに行ったのよ

  • and about 50 meters was enough for me, panting and heaving.

    50メーターを走っただけで、もうくたくたになったの

  • And I had these legs that were made of

    私の足は、ベルクロストラップで取り付けられた

  • a wood and plastic compound, attached with Velcro straps --

    木とプラスチックで出来た義足で

  • big, thick, five-ply wool socks on --

    さらに大きくてぶ厚いウールの靴下を履いていたの

  • you know, not the most comfortable things, but all I'd ever known.

    あまり楽じゃなかったけど、それしかなかったのよ

  • And I'm up there in Boston against people

    そしてボストンで、炭素黒鉛で出来た

  • wearing legs made of all things -- carbon graphite

    緩衝装置とかが付いている義足の人達と

  • and, you know, shock absorbers in them and all sorts of things --

    競争しようとしていたの

  • and they're all looking at me like,

    その人達は、私を見ながら

  • OK, we know who's not going to win this race.

    「それじゃあ、勝てないだろう」って考えてたと思うわ

  • And, I mean, I went up there expecting --

    で、つまり、そこで私が期待していたのは --

  • I don't know what I was expecting --

    何を期待してたのかよく分からないけど --

  • but, you know, when I saw a man who was missing an entire leg

    競技会で、片足全体がなかった男の人が

  • go up to the high jump, hop on one leg to the high jump

    1本足で走り高跳びをして

  • and clear it at six feet, two inches ...

    183センチを飛んだのを見たのね

  • Dan O'Brien jumped 5'11" in '96 in Atlanta,

    1996年のアトランタのオリンピックでダン・オブライエンが156センチを跳んだの

  • I mean, if it just gives you a comparison of --

    つまりいわゆる「アスリート」ではなくても

  • these are truly accomplished athletes,

    そんな熟練した

  • without qualifying that word "athlete."

    すごい人がいることが分かったの

  • And so I decided to give this a shot: heart pounding,

    それで、私も挑戦しようって決めて、でもドキドキしながら

  • I ran my first race and I beat the national record-holder

    初めて競技に出たわ この初めての競技で

  • by three hundredths of a second,

    国内記録保持者に0.03秒の差で勝ったわ

  • and became the new national record-holder on my first try out.

    そして、新国内記録保持者になったの

  • And, you know, people said,

    だけど、こう言われたの

  • "Aimee, you know, you've got speed -- you've got natural speed --

    「エイミーは自然なスピードを持っているけど

  • but you don't have any skill or finesse going down that track.

    トラックを走る為の技術とか策がないね

  • You were all over the place.

    走るフォームがめちゃくちゃだった

  • We all saw how hard you were working."

    でもすごく頑張っていることは分かったよ」

  • And so I decided to call the track coach at Georgetown.

    それで、ジョージタウンの陸上競技のコーチに電話しようと決めたの

  • And I thank god I didn't know just how huge this man is in the track and field world.

    ありがたいことに、私はそのコーチがどんなに偉い人か知らなかったの

  • He's coached five Olympians, and

    彼はオリンピック選手5人を指導したことがあって、

  • the man's office is lined from floor to ceiling

    オフィスには、床から天井まで

  • with All America certificates

    彼が指導した選手達の全米中の表彰状が

  • of all these athletes he's coached.

    一面に飾られていたのよ

  • He's just a rather intimidating figure.

    それに、単純にかなり怖い人物だったわ

  • And I called him up and said, "Listen, I ran one race and I won ..."

    それでコーチに電話して「あの、私 一度だけ競技に出て 優勝したんですけど」って言ったの

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • "I want to see if I can, you know --

    「ちょっとお聞きしたいことがあって --

  • I need to just see if I can sit in on some of your practices,

    出来れば、あなたの練習を見学して

  • see what drills you do and whatever."

    どんな風に訓練してるのか、とか知りたいんです」

  • That's all I wanted -- just two practices.

    それだけなの 2回だけ練習を見たかったのよ

  • "Can I just sit in and see what you do?"

    それで、「見学しても良いですか?」と聞いたのよ

  • And he said, "Well, we should meet first, before we decide anything."

    そしたら「そうだね、決める前にまず会おう」って言われたの

  • You know, he's thinking, "What am I getting myself into?"

    「一体これはどうしたものかな・・・」とコーチが考えてたと思うの

  • So, I met the man, walked in his office,

    それで、コーチに会って、オフィスに入ったら

  • and saw these posters and magazine covers of people he has coached.

    彼が指導した選手が出ているポスターや雑誌表紙がたくさんあったのよ

  • And we got to talking,

    そして、私達はじっくり話し合って

  • and it turned out to be a great partnership

    結局、素晴らしいパートナーシップを結んだのよ

  • because he'd never coached a disabled athlete,

    コーチは障害を持った競技者を指導したことがなかったので

  • so therefore he had no preconceived notions

    私の能力に関して

  • of what I was or wasn't capable of,

    先入観を持っていなかったの

  • and I'd never been coached before.

    私は指導されたことがなかったから

  • So this was like, "Here we go -- let's start on this trip."

    「さぁ始めるよ!」って感じがやっとしてきたの

  • So he started giving me four days a week of his lunch break,

    それから、コーチは週4日昼休みとかに時間を作ってくれて

  • his free time, and I would come up to the track and train with him.

    トラックで一緒に練習していたの

  • So that's how I met Frank.

    それがフランクとの出会いでした

  • That was fall of '95. But then, by the time that winter was rolling around,

    その時は95年の秋だったけど、冬が来るころに

  • he said, "You know, you're good enough.

    フランクは、「もう十分上手になった

  • You can run on our women's track team here."

    ここの女子陸上競技部でやっていける」って言ったの

  • And I said, "No, come on."

    「いや、そんなの無理よ」と私が言ったんだけど

  • And he said, "No, no, really. You can.

    フランクは「いや本当だ 君ならできるよ

  • You can run with our women's track team."

    うちの女子チームと走れる」と言ったの

  • In the spring of 1996, with my goal of making the U.S. Paralympic team

    そして、アメリカのパラリンピック代表選手になる事を目指して

  • that May coming up full speed, I joined the women's track team.

    1996年の5月にジョージタウンの女子陸上競技部に入ったの。

  • And no disabled person had ever done that -- run at a collegiate level.

    今まで身体障害者で大学レベルで走った人はいなかった

  • So I don't know, it started to become an interesting mix.

    それで、なんというか面白いミックスになってきたの

  • SS: Well, on your way to the Olympics,

    シェリル:オリンピックへ行く途中での話も聞きたいけど

  • a couple of memorable events happened at Georgetown.

    でも、ジョージタウンで忘れられない出来事があるのよね

  • Why don't you just tell them?

    その話をしてくれる?

  • AM: Yes, well, you know, I'd won everything as far as the disabled meets --

    エイミー:ええと、結局私が出場した障害者部門の競技で

  • everything I competed in -- and, you know, training in Georgetown

    全部優勝したの。でも、ジョージタウンで練習してたので

  • and knowing that I was going to have to get used to

    他の人の背中を見ながら走ることに慣れなきゃ

  • seeing the backs of all these women's shirts --

    いけないんだろうな、って思っていたの

  • you know, I'm running against the next Flo-Jo --

    だって、ジョイナーの卵のような人と競争してたから

  • and they're all looking at me like,

    でも皆が私に注目していたのよ

  • "Hmm, what's, you know, what's going on here?"

    「ええ?これは一体どういうこと?」と思ってたんでしょうね

  • And putting on my Georgetown uniform

    そして、ジョージタウンのユニフォームを着て

  • and going out there and knowing that, you know,

    皆と練習しながら考えたの

  • in order to become better -- and I'm already the best in the country --

    より上達する為には -- まあ、既に全米でトップだったけど --

  • you know, you have to train with people who are inherently better than you.

    自分より本質的に強い選手と一緒に練習しなきゃ、ってね

  • And I went out there and made it to the Big East,

    で、ビッグ・イーストのリーグに参加したの

  • which was sort of the championship race at the end of the season.

    シーズンの終わりの選手権大会のようなもの

  • It was really, really hot.

    とても、とても暑くて

  • And it's the first --

    そして、ちょうどその頃ね

  • I had just gotten these new sprinting legs that you see in that bio,

    私の経歴にあるように、短距離用の新たな義足をもらったの

  • and I didn't realize at that time that

    その時は知らなかったけど

  • the amount of sweating I would be doing in the sock --

    靴下の中でかいた汗は

  • it actually acted like a lubricant

    潤滑剤のようになって

  • and I'd be, kind of, pistoning in the socket.

    体がソケットの中で上下するピストンみたいになるの

  • And at about 85 meters of my 100 meters sprint, in all my glory,

    そして、公衆の面前で100メートル走の85メートルの地点で

  • I came out of my leg.

    義足から転げ落ちてしまったの

  • Like, I almost came out of it, in front of, like, 5,000 people.

    というか、転げ落ちになりそうだった 5000人の目の前で

  • And I, I mean, was just mortified --

    恥ずかしくて死にそうだったわ

  • because I was signed up for the 200, you know, which went off in a half hour.

    30分後には200メートル走に出るはずだったし

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I went to my coach: "Please, don't make me do this."

    そして、コーチにこう言ったの 「お願いです。棄権させて下さい!

  • I can't do this in front of all those people. My legs will come off.

    皆の前じゃ無理 脚がぜったい抜けてしまう

  • And if it came off at 85 there's no way I'm going 200 meters.

    85メートル地点で抜ければ、200メートルまでは絶対無理。」

  • And he just sat there like this.

    それで、コーチはこんなふうに座って

  • My pleas fell on deaf ears, thank god.

    ありがたい事に、耳を傾けなかったの

  • Because you know, the man is from Brooklyn;

    まあ、ブルックリンの人だから

  • he's a big man. He says, "Aimee, so what if your leg falls off?

    大物だし・・・で、ブルックリン訛りで 「エイミー、足が抜けても問題ないだろ?

  • You pick it up, you put the damn thing back on,

    ただそいつを拾って、履いて

  • and finish the goddamn race!"

    レースを完走するんだよ!」と言ったの

  • (Laughter) (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • And I did. So, he kept me in line.

    で、そうしました。それで、恐怖に打ち勝つことができたの

  • He kept me on the right track.

    コーチのお陰で、道をそれずに済んだの

  • SS: So, then Aimee makes it to the 1996 Paralympics,

    シェリル: そのあと、エイミーは1996年のパラリンピック代表選手になって

  • and she's all excited. Her family's coming down -- it's a big deal.

    すごく興奮して、家族が訪問してきて、一大事でした

  • It's now two years that you've been running?

    で、エイミーが走り始めて2年になるのかしら?

  • AM: No, a year.

    エイミー: 1年です

  • SS: A year. And why don't you tell them what happened

    シェリル: 1年。じゃあ、オリンピックに出る前の

  • right before you go run your race?

    話をしてくれる?

  • AM: Okay, well, Atlanta.

    エイミー: はい。アトランタの話なんだけど

  • The Paralympics, just for a little bit of clarification,

    ちょっと説明したいんですが、パラリンピックは

  • are the Olympics for people with physical disabilities --

    切断患者、脳性麻痺の人、車椅子の選手など

  • amputees, persons with cerebral palsy, and wheelchair athletes --

    身体障害者のためのオリンピックです

  • as opposed to the Special Olympics,

    精神障害者の為の

  • which deals with people with mental disabilities.

    スペシャル・オリンピックとは違います

  • So, here we are, a week after the Olympics and down at Atlanta,

    で、オリンピックの1週間後、アトランタに来てたの

  • and I'm just blown away by the fact that

    でも1年前には 砂利のトラックで

  • just a year ago, I got out on a gravel track and couldn't run 50 meters.

    50メートル走れなかったくらいだから もう圧倒されていたのね

  • And so, here I am -- never lost.

    でも一方で、まだ負けたことはなかった

  • I set new records at the U.S. Nationals -- the Olympic trials -- that May,

    その5月、オリンピック代表選考会で、複数の新記録を樹立していたし

  • and was sure that I was coming home with the gold.

    金メダルを持って帰るんだ と信じていた

  • I was also the only, what they call "bilateral BK" -- below the knee.

    あと、ひざの下が、いわゆる「バイラテラルBK」なのは、私以外は誰もいなくて

  • I was the only woman who would be doing the long jump.

    走り幅跳びをする女子は私だけだったの

  • I had just done the long jump,

    そして、走り幅跳びを終えてから

  • and a guy who was missing two legs came up to me and says,

    両脚がない男の人が来て

  • "How do you do that? You know, we're supposed to have a planar foot,

    「どうやってるの? プレーナーの脚を使うことになっているんだけど

  • so we can't get off on the springboard."

    じゃなきゃ、跳躍台から飛べないよ」って言ったの

  • I said, "Well, I just did it. No one told me that."

    私は「でも、さっき飛んだわよ。そんなの聞いていないわ」と言ったの

  • So, it's funny -- I'm three inches within the world record --

    結局、世界記録に8センチ足りなくて、でも変な話

  • and kept on from that point, you know,

    だから、頑張り続けることが出来たのよ

  • so I'm signed up in the long jump -- signed up?

    それから、走り幅跳びに申し込んで

  • No, I made it for the long jump and the 100-meter.

    いや、申し込んだんじゃなくて、走り幅跳びと100メートル競争の参加資格を得たの

  • And I'm sure of it, you know?

    今でも覚えてるわ

  • I made the front page of my hometown paper

    6年間配達した地元の新聞に

  • that I delivered for six years, you know?

    私の顔が載ったのよ

  • It was, like, this is my time for shine.

    私の時代が来た、って感じでした

  • And we're at the trainee warm-up track,

    とにかく、オリンピックのスタジアムから数ブロックの所にある

  • which is a few blocks away from the Olympic stadium.

    スタジアムのトラックでウォームアップしていたの

  • These legs that I was on, which I'll take out right now --

    私が使ってた義足、、、今出すわね

  • I was the first person in the world on these legs.

    こういう義足を使ったのは、私が初めてだったの

  • I was the guinea pig., I'm telling you,

    私は、実験台みたいなものだったから

  • this was, like -- talk about a tourist attraction.

    何ていうか、私は観光名所のようなものだったのよ

  • Everyone was taking pictures -- "What is this girl running on?"

    皆、「この娘、何で走っているの?」と思いながら、私の写真を撮ってたのよ

  • And I'm always looking around, like, where is my competition?

    私はいつも「競争相手はどこ?」と思っていました

  • It's my first international meet.

    これは、私の最初の国際大会でした

  • I tried to get it out of anybody I could,

    誰かから、役に立つ情報を引き出そうとして

  • you know, "Who am I running against here?"

    「今回はどんな人と走るの?」と聞いたけど

  • "Oh, Aimee, we'll have to get back to you on that one."

    「さあ誰だろ、わかったら教えてあげるよ」とか言うだけなの

  • I wanted to find out times.

    レース・タイムも知りたかったし...

  • "Don't worry, you're doing great."

    「いや、心配しないで!君は大丈夫!」としか言わなかったの

  • This is 20 minutes before my race in the Olympic stadium,

    それが、オリンピック・スタジアムでの競技20分前でした

  • and they post the heat sheets. And I go over and look.

    予選の情報が出されて、見に行きました

  • And my fastest time, which was the world record, was 15.77.

    世界記録の私の個人最高タイムは15.77秒でした

  • Then I'm looking: the next lane, lane two, is 12.8.

    となりの第2レーンの人のタイムは12.8秒でした

  • Lane three is 12.5. Lane four is 12.2. I said, "What's going on?"

    第3レーンは12.5秒で、第4レーンは12.2でした 「ええ、何これ?」

  • And they shove us all into the shuttle bus,

    それから、他の選手と一緒にシャトルバスに乗ったのだけど

  • and all the women there are missing a hand.

    他の人はみんな 片方の手がなかったの

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So, I'm just, like --

    私はもう こんな感じ...

  • they're all looking at me like 'which one of these is not like the other,' you know?

    皆 「なんか、この人はなんとなく違うなあ」という感じで私を見てました

  • I'm sitting there, like, "Oh, my god. Oh, my god."

    そしてバスの中で 「えっ!どうしよう!どうしよう!」と思ってたの

  • You know, I'd never lost anything,

    私は負けたことがなかったんですね

  • like, whether it would be the scholarship or, you know,

    色々・・・奨学金とか

  • I'd won five golds when I skied. In everything, I came in first.

    スキーをした時は、金メダル5個勝ち取ったし・・・いつも1位だったの

  • And Georgetown -- that was great.

    それに ジョージタウンも 素晴しかった

  • I was losing, but it was the best training because this was Atlanta.

    いつも負けてたけど、アトランタに行く為の最高の練習だったしね

  • Here we are, like, crème de la crème,

    でも今は、一流の選手と一緒にいて

  • and there is no doubt about it, that I'm going to lose big.

    間違いなく、ボロボロに負けると思ったわ。

  • And, you know, I'm just thinking,

    それで、私はただひたすら心配して

  • "Oh, my god, my whole family got in a van

    「ああ、どうしよう。家族の皆がワゴン車に乗って

  • and drove down here from Pennsylvania."

    ペンシルベニア州からわざわざ来てくれたのに」って考えて

  • And, you know, I was the only female U.S. sprinter.

    それから、アメリカの女子短距離走者は私しかいなかったのね

  • So they call us out and, you know --

    とにかく、皆の名前が呼ばれて

  • "Ladies, you have one minute."

    「皆さん、後1分です」と言われて

  • And I remember putting my blocks in and just feeling horrified

    すごくドキドキしながら、スタート台を組み立てていたら

  • because there was just this murmur coming over the crowd,

    観客がざわざわし始めて

  • like, the ones who are close enough to the starting line to see.

    特にスタートラインに近い人は私が良く見えたから...

  • And I'm like, "I know! Look! This isn't right."

    私は「そうよ。見てよ。なんかおかしいでしょ」って感じ

  • And I'm thinking that's my last card to play here;

    まあ、それで「負ける事がもう分かってるんだから

  • if I'm not going to beat these girls,

    皆をかき乱してやろう」と思ったの

  • I'm going to mess their heads a little, you know?

    それ以外に手がなかったのね

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I mean, it was definitely the "Rocky IV" sensation of me versus Germany,

    ロッキー4みたいな感じ。私対ドイツ。

  • and everyone else -- Estonia and Poland -- was in this heat.

    そして、他の選手全員。エストニアやポーランドとかの人がいて

  • And the gun went off, and all I remember was

    それから、スタートを告げる銃が鳴った

  • finishing last and

    最下位に終わったことしか覚えてないわ

  • fighting back tears of frustration and incredible -- incredible --

    悔し涙をこらえながら

  • this feeling of just being overwhelmed.

    ただもう打ちのめされた感じで

  • And I had to think, "Why did I do this?"

    「何のため来たの?

  • If I had won everything -- but it was like, what was the point?

    もう、世界記録を持ってるのに、来た意味あったの?」と考えずにはいられなかった

  • All this training -- I had transformed my life.

    ずっとトレーニングをして、人生まで転換させて

  • I became a collegiate athlete, you know. I became an Olympic athlete.

    大学運動選手、そしてオリンピック選手になった

  • And it made me really think about how

    そこまで達成するまでの道のりが

  • the achievement was getting there.

    どうだったか、という事を考えたの

  • I mean, the fact that I set my sights, just a year and three months before,

    特に、オリンピック選手になろうと決心したのは

  • on becoming an Olympic athlete and saying,

    たった1年3ヶ月前で

  • "Here's my life going in this direction --

    それを目標に人生を進んで

  • and I want to take it here for a while,

    しばらくそうして頑張って