Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • President Obama: Xin chào!

  • (applause)

  • Xin chào Vietnam!

  • (applause)

  • Thank you.

  • Thank you so much.

  • To the government and the people of Vietnam, thank you

  • for this very warm welcome and the hospitality that you

  • have shown to me on this visit.

  • And thank all of you for being here today.

  • (applause)

  • We have Vietnamese from across this great country,

  • including so many young people who represent the

  • dynamism, and the talent and the hope of Vietnam.

  • On this visit, my heart has been touched by the kindness

  • for which the Vietnamese people are known.

  • In the many people who have been lining the streets,

  • smiling and waving, I feel the friendship

  • between our peoples.

  • Last night, I visited the Old Quarter here in Hanoi

  • and enjoyed some outstanding Vietnamese food.

  • I tried some Bún Ch .

  • (applause)

  • Drank some bia Ha Noi.

  • But I have to say, the busy streets of this city, I've

  • never seen so many motorbikes in my life.

  • (laughter)

  • So I haven't had to try to cross the street so far, but

  • maybe when I come back and visit you can tell me how.

  • I am not the first American President to come to Vietnam

  • in recent times.

  • But I am the first, like so many of you, who came of age

  • after the war between our countries.

  • When the last U.S.

  • forces left Vietnam, I was just 13 years old.

  • So my first exposure to Vietnam and the Vietnamese

  • people came when I was growing up in Hawaii, with

  • its proud Vietnamese American community there.

  • At the same time, many people in this country are

  • much younger than me.

  • Like my two daughters, many of you have lived your whole

  • lives knowing only one thing -- and that is peace and

  • normalized relations between Vietnam and the United States.

  • So I come here mindful of the past, mindful of our

  • difficult history, but focused on the future -- the

  • prosperity, security and human dignity

  • that we can advance together.

  • I also come here with a deep respect for Vietnam's

  • ancient heritage.

  • For millennia, farmers have tended these lands -- a

  • history revealed in the Dong Son drums.

  • At this bend in the river, Hanoi has endured for more

  • than a thousand years.

  • The world came to treasure Vietnamese silks and

  • paintings, and a great Temple of Literature stands

  • as a testament to your pursuit of knowledge.

  • And yet, over the centuries, your fate was too often

  • dictated by others.

  • Your beloved land was not always your own.

  • But like bamboo, the unbroken spirit of the

  • Vietnamese people was captured by Ly Thuong Kiet

  • -- "the Southern emperor rules the Southern land.

  • Our destiny is writ in Heaven's Book."

  • Today, we also remember the longer history between

  • Vietnamese and Americans that is too often overlooked.

  • More than 200 years ago, when our Founding Father,

  • Thomas Jefferson, sought rice for his farm, he looked

  • to the rice of Vietnam, which he said had "the

  • reputation of being whitest to the eye, best flavored to

  • the taste, and most productive."

  • Soon after, American trade ships arrived in your ports

  • seeking commerce.

  • During the Second World War, Americans came here to

  • support your struggle against occupation.

  • When American pilots were shot down, the Vietnamese

  • people helped rescue them.

  • And on the day that Vietnam declared its independence,

  • crowds took to the streets of this city, and Ho Chi

  • Minh evoked the American Declaration of Independence.

  • He said, "All people are created equal.

  • The Creator has endowed them with inviolable rights.

  • Among these rights are the right to life, the right to

  • liberty, and the right to the pursuit of happiness."

  • In another time, the profession of these shared

  • ideals and our common story of throwing off colonialism

  • might have brought us closer together sooner.

  • But instead, Cold War rivalries and fears of

  • communism pulled us into conflict.

  • Like other conflicts throughout human history, we

  • learned once more a bitter truth -- that war, no matter

  • what our intentions may be, brings suffering

  • and tragedy.

  • At your war memorial not far from here, and with family

  • altars across this country, you remember some 3 million

  • Vietnamese, soldiers and civilians, on both sides,

  • who lost their lives.

  • At our memorial wall in Washington, we can touch the

  • names of 58,315 Americans who gave their lives

  • in the conflict.

  • In both our countries, our veterans and families of the

  • fallen still ache for the friends and loved ones

  • that they lost.

  • Just as we learned in America that, even if we

  • disagree about a war, we must always honor those who

  • serve and welcome them home with the respect they

  • deserve, we can join together today, Vietnamese

  • and Americans, and acknowledge the pain and the

  • sacrifices on both sides.

  • More recently, over the past two decades, Vietnam has

  • achieved enormous progress, and today the world can see

  • the strides that you have made.

  • With economic reforms and trade agreements, including

  • with the United States, you have entered the global

  • economy, selling your goods around the world.

  • More foreign investment is coming in.

  • And with one of the fastest-growing economies in

  • Asia, Vietnam has moved up to become

  • a middle-income nation.

  • We see Vietnam's progress in the skyscrapers and

  • high-rises of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, and new

  • shopping malls and urban centers.

  • We see it in the satellites Vietnam puts into space and

  • a new generation that is online, launching startups

  • and running new ventures.

  • We see it in the tens of millions of Vietnamese

  • connected on Facebook and Instagram.

  • And you're not just posting selfies -- although I hear

  • you do that a lot --

  • (laughter)

  • -- and so far, there have been a number of people who

  • have already asked me for selfies.

  • You're also raising your voices for causes that you

  • care about, like saving the old trees of Hanoi.

  • So all this dynamism has delivered real progress

  • in people's lives.

  • Here in Vietnam, you've dramatically reduced extreme

  • poverty, you've boosted family incomes and lifted

  • millions into a fast-growing middle class.

  • Hunger, disease, child and maternal mortality are all down.

  • The number of people with clean drinking water and

  • electricity, the number of boys and girls in school,

  • and your literacy rate -- these are all up.

  • This is extraordinary progress.

  • This is what you have been able to achieve

  • in a very short time.

  • And as Vietnam has transformed, so has the

  • relationship between our two nations.

  • We learned a lesson taught by the venerable Thich Nhat

  • Hanh, who said, "In true dialogue, both sides are

  • willing to change."

  • In this way, the very war that had divided us became a

  • source for healing.

  • It allowed us to account for the missing and finally

  • bring them home.

  • It allowed us to help remove landmines and unexploded

  • bombs, because no child should ever lose a leg

  • just playing outside.

  • Even as we continue to assist Vietnamese with

  • disabilities, including children, we are also

  • continuing to help remove Agent Orange -- dioxin -- so

  • that Vietnam can reclaim more of your land.

  • We're proud of our work together in Danang, and we

  • look forward to supporting your efforts in Bien Hoa.

  • Let's also not forget that the reconciliation between

  • our countries was led by our veterans who once faced each

  • other in battle.

  • Think of Senator John McCain, who was held for

  • years here as a prisoner of war, meeting General Giap,

  • who said our countries should not be enemies

  • but friends.

  • Think of all the veterans, Vietnamese and American, who

  • have helped us heal and build new ties.

  • Few have done more in this regard over the years than

  • former Navy lieutenant, and now Secretary of State of

  • the United States, John Kerry, who is here today.

  • And on behalf of all of us, John, we thank you for your

  • extraordinary effort.

  • (applause)

  • Because our veterans showed us the way, because warriors

  • had the courage to pursue peace, our peoples are now

  • closer than ever before.

  • Our trade has surged.

  • Our students and scholars learn together.

  • We welcome more Vietnamese students to America than

  • from any other country in Southeast Asia.

  • And every year, you welcome more and more American

  • tourists, including young Americans with their

  • backpacks, to Hanoi's 36 Streets and the shops of Hoi

  • An, and the imperial city of Hue.

  • As Vietnamese and Americans, we can all relate to those

  • words written by Van Cao -- "From now, we know each

  • other's homeland; from now, we learn to feel

  • for each other."

  • As President, I've built on this progress.

  • With our new Comprehensive Partnership, our governments

  • are working more closely together than ever before.

  • And with this visit, we've put our relationship on a

  • firmer footing for decades to come.

  • In a sense, the long story between our two nations that

  • began with Thomas Jefferson more than two centuries ago

  • has now come full circle.

  • It has taken many years and required great effort.

  • But now we can say something that was once unimaginable:

  • Today, Vietnam and the United States are partners.

  • And I believe our experience holds lessons for the world.

  • At a time when many conflicts seem intractable,

  • seem as if they will never end, we have shown that

  • hearts can change and that a different future is possible

  • when we refuse to be prisoners of the past.

  • We've shown how peace can be better than war.

  • We've shown that progress and human dignity is best

  • advanced by cooperation and not conflict.

  • That's what Vietnam and America can show the world.

  • Now, America's new partnership with Vietnam is

  • rooted in some basic truths.

  • Vietnam is an independent, sovereign nation, and no

  • other nation can impose its will on you

  • or decide your destiny.

  • (applause)

  • Now, the United States has an interest here.

  • We have an interest in Vietnam's success.

  • But our Comprehensive Partnership is still

  • in its early stages.

  • And with the time I have left, I want to share with

  • you the vision that I believe can guide us

  • in the decades ahead.

  • First, let's work together to create real opportunity

  • and prosperity for all of our people.

  • We know the ingredients for economic success

  • in the 21st century.

  • In our global economy, investment and trade flows

  • to wherever there is rule of law, because no one wants to

  • pay a bribe to start a business.

  • Nobody wants to sell their goods or go to school if

  • they don't know how they're going to be treated.

  • In knowledge-based economies, jobs go to where

  • people have the freedom to think for themselves and

  • exchange ideas and to innovate.

  • And real economic partnerships are not just

  • about one country extracting resources from another.

  • They're about investing in our greatest resource, which

  • is our people and their skills and their talents,

  • whether you live in a big city or a rural village.

  • And that's the kind of partnership that America offers.

  • As I announced yesterday, the Peace Corps will come to

  • Vietnam for the first time, with a focus

  • on teaching English.

  • A generation after young Americans came here to

  • fight, a new generation of Americans are going to come

  • here to teach and build and deepen

  • the friendship between us.

  • (applause)

  • Some of America's leading technology companies and

  • academic institutions are joining Vietnamese

  • universities to strengthen training in science,