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  • - [Voiceover] Hello grammarians.

  • So today I'd like to talk to you

  • about the idea of concrete and abstract nouns,

  • and before we do that,

  • I'd like to get into some word origins or etymology.

  • So let's take each of these words in turn,

  • because I think by digging into what these words mean,

  • literally what they mean and where they come from,

  • we'll get a better understanding of this concept.

  • So both of these words come to us from Latin.

  • Concrete comes to us from the Latin concretus,

  • which means to grow together.

  • So this part of it means grown.

  • And this part means together.

  • It refers to something that, you know,

  • has grown together and become thick

  • and kind of hard to get through and physical.

  • The connotation here is that this is a physical thing.

  • Something that is concrete is physical.

  • Abstract, on the other hand, means to draw something away.

  • So something that is abstract is drawn away from the real,

  • from the concrete, from the physical.

  • So this is not physical.

  • And we make this distinction in English

  • when we're talking about nouns.

  • Is it something that is concrete,

  • is it something you can look at or pick up

  • or smell or sense or something that is abstract,

  • something that isn't physical,

  • but can still be talked about.

  • So for example, the word sadness...

  • Is a noun, right?

  • This is definitely a noun.

  • It's got this noun-making ending,

  • this noun-forming suffix, ness.

  • You know, we take the adjective sad

  • and we toss this ness part onto it, we've got a noun.

  • But can you see sadness?

  • Is it something you can pick up?

  • Sure, you can tell by being, you know

  • observant and empathetic that your friend is sad,

  • but it's not something you can pick up.

  • You can't be like a measurable degree of sad.

  • You couldn't take someone's sadness,

  • put it under a microscope and say

  • "Oh, Roberta, you are 32 degrees microsad."

  • You know, it's not something physical.

  • Concrete things, on the other hand,

  • are things that we can see or count or measure.

  • Just parts of the physical world.

  • So anything you look at, like a dog is concrete,

  • a ball is concrete, a cliff is concrete.

  • Happiness...

  • Is abstract.

  • The idea of freedom...

  • Is abstract.

  • Though the presence of freedom in your life

  • may manifest in physical objects, like

  • "Oh, my parents let me have the freedom to eat ice cream."

  • Ice cream is, you know, a concrete noun.

  • But freedom, the thing that allows you, you know,

  • the permission that you get from

  • your parents to have ice cream.

  • That's not a physical object.

  • So that's basically the difference.

  • So a concrete noun is a physical object

  • and an abstract noun is not.

  • This is why I really wanted to hit

  • the idea that a noun can be a person, place, thing or idea,

  • because nouns can be ideas,

  • and those ideas tend to be abstract.

  • Sadness, happiness, freedom, permission, liberty, injustice.

  • All of these are abstract ideas.

  • That's the difference.

  • You can learn anything.

  • David out.

- [Voiceover] Hello grammarians.

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B1 中級

具体名詞と抽象名詞|品詞|文法 (Concrete and abstract nouns | The parts of speech | Grammar)

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    lawyh0408 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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