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  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: Welcome to the Fireside Chat

  • for Brillo and Weave.

  • I hope you've had a great day seeing all the talks here

  • at the Ubiquity conference.

  • As you can see, we've had a whole bunch

  • of really cool information just come out today

  • about Brillo and Weave and all the exciting possibilities

  • that it has.

  • My name's Wayne Piekarski, and I'm

  • a Developer Advocate at Google.

  • I work with the product teams to communicate information

  • to developers and also feed information

  • back to the product teams to help make our products better,

  • and so forth.

  • So we all work together, and we run events like this,

  • and so we hope you found it very useful.

  • What we thought we'd do is have a session where we can sit down

  • with some of the important people on the Brillo and Weave

  • team-- talk to them about what makes

  • them do the things that they do, and what they find interesting,

  • and what kind of ideas that they have.

  • So today, we have three speakers.

  • We've got Ryan Cairns, we've got Paul Westbrook,

  • and we've got Guarav Shah.

  • And what I'll do is I'll start off

  • by just asking them to say a little bit about what

  • they do at Google and what their important role is.

  • RYAN CAIRNS: Sure.

  • My name's Ryan.

  • I'm an engineering director.

  • I run the Brillo and Weave project.

  • I started the project about three years ago.

  • And I take care of all the engineering stuff.

  • PAUL WESTBROOK: My name is Paul Westbrook.

  • I'm the engineering lead of Weave.

  • We're focusing on the mobile device side and server

  • side of Weave.

  • GUARAV SHAH: Hey, I'm Guarav.

  • I'm the engineering lead for Brillo.

  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: Cool.

  • Thanks.

  • I was hoping with the Fireside Chat,

  • we'd have an actual fireplace here.

  • But we don't have that.

  • They wouldn't let us run a fireplace screen on this thing.

  • Anyway, today we had the little pet feeder during the keynote.

  • That's something where I was like,

  • you know what, I really want this pet feeder,

  • because it solves a problem that I have.

  • And so I thought it would be a really cool question to ask.

  • What magic device have you always wanted

  • that, now that we have Brillo and Weave,

  • you maybe could build-- or someone else could

  • build-- and sell it as a product or whatever?

  • What's something that's exciting?

  • Guarav?

  • GUARAV SHAH: I guess my dream project is, all the walls are

  • screens, and it's easy for me to project anything

  • on any of the screens, or rather, the walls.

  • So that's what I would like to be able to prototype.

  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: I guess some of these little boards

  • were giving-- they have like, little HDMI ports on them,

  • so you could do something like that pretty easily.

  • GUARAV SHAH: Absolutely.

  • And you can also drive LEDs and LCD screens via the [INAUDIBLE]

  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: Yeah.

  • Actually, one of my colleagues had

  • this cool project where they were

  • controlling strips of lights and they were blinking,

  • all kinds of things.

  • And there's all kinds of cool possibilities of little things

  • you can do that doesn't require a massive screen,

  • but you can use really cheap little components

  • to make something interesting.

  • GUARAV SHAH: Yeah.

  • Definitely.

  • You can daisy chain them, and yeah.

  • Pretty exciting.

  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: Cool.

  • What about you, Paul?

  • PAUL WESTBROOK: One of the things that I want to build

  • is something to control my garage door.

  • Because oftentimes, I will-- I'm always

  • worried about leaving it open.

  • RYAN CAIRNS: Well, then you just drive your car

  • and come back home and check again, and then drive off.

  • Right?

  • PAUL WESTBROOK: Well, that, but then-- you're wasting gas.

  • But the other thing is making sure the lights turn

  • on and off, especially to detect presence.

  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: I was thinking I've always wanted something

  • where it's like-- what's the state of all the doors?

  • Show me every time they opened, show me

  • a log or something interesting like that.

  • Because the door may have been opened unexpectedly

  • or something like that.

  • Yeah, it's interesting.

  • What about you?

  • RYAN CAIRNS: For me, it was really--

  • I was working on Chromebooks at the time,

  • and we were doing a bunch of Wi-Fi stuff.

  • And I really wanted a Wi-Fi router that was easy to use.

  • So I'd kick that product off.

  • And then, beyond products, one of the reasons

  • that we did Brillo and Weave in the first place was we

  • just saw people wrestling with the same set of problems

  • over and over again.

  • Google was getting into doing hardware.

  • Everybody was fighting to figure out, OK,

  • what Wi-Fi solution do I need to use?

  • What Bluetooth solution do I need to use?

  • How's auto-update going to work?

  • What's my security story?

  • And we already solved a bunch of that

  • stuff, so we were looking at, how do we package that up

  • for people?

  • That was really my goal with this.

  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: Yeah.

  • Security is an interesting thing.

  • Because I always have this terrifying thought of, well,

  • if my heater is controlled by my computer, and someone hacks

  • into it, they can set my house on fire or something like that.

  • So security seems a really big deal

  • that you really have to get this right.

  • And so, what kind of things are we

  • doing to make sure that security--

  • because it seems like that's like the number one priority

  • for a lot of things nowadays.

  • So what are we doing to make it really awesome?

  • RYAN CAIRNS: There's a few things.

  • At a high level, we're working on some platform security

  • features in the OS, and we'll let Guarav talk

  • about that in a second.

  • We're enabling software updates, because we

  • don't think that you can have a security solution with devices

  • being fixed in the field.

  • You always need to be able to push new code to them.

  • And then on the Weave side, I'll let Paul talk

  • to what we're doing about local authentication and things

  • like that.

  • GUARAV SHAH: So yeah, I can speak to the Brillo side.

  • Interestingly, before I was working on Brillo,

  • I was working on Chromebook security.

  • And we ended up designing a very defense in-depth model

  • for building a very secure device.

  • And that's pretty much been verified time and time again

  • based on various security competitions and intrusion

  • detection-- the performance of Chromebooks

  • at these kind of events.

  • So for Brillo, I think there are a couple of things that

  • are in boat on the platform.

  • So verified boot, which makes sure

  • that you're not running malicious code on your device.

  • I think that's a core part of the security,

  • and we talk about verified boot starting

  • from when your device boots up, so all the code that runs

  • is verified.

  • Then the other thing that you want to enable

  • is, we want to enable sandboxing and other mechanisms that

  • are default on and that are very easy to use.

  • So we have kind of build a lot of the same technologies

  • that Android already has, plus some of the things

  • that we designed for Chromebooks,

  • like second BPF and other sandboxing mechanisms.

  • These are a core part of Brillo.

  • The final part that Ryan alluded to is updates.

  • We really feel that updates are really

  • a core part of building a secure device,

  • because anything you build, any software you write,

  • it's always going to have bugs.

  • And being able to update this device in the field,

  • and doing so in a way that is very seamless, non-destructive,

  • error-free is very important.

  • And so update is a core part of Brillo security as well.

  • WAYNE PIEKARSKI: I guess one other thing

  • is that a lot of OEMs will make a device,