Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Four years ago I was speaking with a girl named Sarah.

    4年前、サラという女の子と話していました。

  • Sarah said to me, "Chris, I have Asperger syndrome.

    サラが「クリス、私はアスペルガー症候群なの。

  • I guess having Asperger's means there are things I can't do."

    "アスペルガーだから できないことがあるんだと思う"

  • I believe we need to rethink the autism spectrum.

    自閉症スペクトラムを見直す必要があると思います。

  • I educate children on their rights

    私は子供たちの権利を教育しています

  • and that says we work with children, their teachers and parents.

    そしてそれは、私たちが子供たち、その先生、親と一緒に仕事をしていると言うことです。

  • I've delivered workshops in about 140 schools.

    これまで約140校でワークショップを行ってきました。

  • I say how autism is a spectrum of behaviors.

    私は、自閉症がどのように行動のスペクトルであるかを言います。

  • On one hand,

    一方では

  • it can cause children to experience social difficulties, anxiety,

    それは子供たちが社会的な困難、不安を経験する原因となります。

  • obsessive traits and disruptive habits.

    強迫観念と破壊的な習慣。

  • But on the other hand, it provides children

    しかし、その一方で、子どもたちに

  • with incredible gifts in memory, focus, detail, and visual perception.

    記憶力、集中力、ディテール、視覚的知覚に優れた信じられないほどの才能を持っています。

  • No two children experience this spectrum in the same way.

    二人の子供が同じようにこのスペクトルを経験することはありません。

  • I met children who might be non-verbal,

    ノンバーバルかもしれない子どもたちに出会いました。

  • children who were genius innovators and in a galaxy all on their own,

    天才的なイノベーターであり、銀河系の中にいた子供たち。

  • or children like Sarah, who have a mild form of autism,

    またはサラのような軽度の自閉症の子供たち。

  • commonly referred to as Asperger syndrome.

    一般的にアスペルガー症候群と呼ばれています。

  • So when Sarah says to me,

    だから、サラが私に言うと

  • "Having Asperger's means there are things I can't do."

    "アスペルガーだからできないことがある"

  • I thought, hang on.

    待ってろと思った。

  • We don't have this label for children to say "I can't".

    子どもたちが「できない」と言うためのレッテルを貼っているわけではありません。

  • We have it for children to say "I can".

    子供が「できる」と言うために持っています。

  • What lead to that rethink

    その再考のきっかけとなったのは

  • was an earlier meeting I had with a mom named Lisa.

    以前、リサというお母さんと会った時のことです。

  • Lisa had been talking to me about her disruptive child.

    リサは乱れた子供の話をしていた。

  • Imagine if,

    想像してみてください。

  • simply because your child doesn't know how to socialize with other children,

    単純にあなたの子供が他の子供との付き合い方を知らないからです。

  • the world outcasts your son or daughter as "the weird one".

    世間はあなたの息子さんや娘さんを「変な人」と見下しています。

  • People start to whisper about you as a parent.

    親になったと囁かれるようになります。

  • You're called the bad parent.

    悪い親と呼ばれている

  • People start to ban you from children's play-dates

    子供の遊び相手から追放されるようになる

  • because your child is just too hard work.

    お子さんが頑張りすぎだから

  • Enough eyebrows get raised about your child

    お子さんのことで眉をひそめる

  • that you're referred to child psychiatrists,

    児童精神科医を紹介されたことを

  • where your child is placed in the fishbowl for seven months

    ななつぼち

  • as all the experts stare at the strange ways that he or she moves.

    専門家が皆、不思議な動きをしているのをじっと見ているうちに

  • That was Lisa's life.

    それがリサの人生だった

  • She told me how the experts called her up and invited her to a meeting,

    専門家が彼女を呼び出して会議に誘った経緯を教えてくれた。

  • where they sat her down, as said this,

    彼らが彼女を座らせたところで、こう言っていました。

  • "Lisa, we're sorry to say

    "リサ、残念なことに

  • that everything that you find fascinating about your child

    あなたが子供の魅力を感じていることは

  • is actually a problem.

    が実は問題なのです。

  • Everything that you thought you were doing right about your parenting,

    子育てについて正しいと思っていたことが全てです。

  • you're actually doing wrong.

    実際には間違ったことをしている

  • Your child has high-functioning autism.

    お子さんは高機能自閉症です。

  • That means your child can function,

    それは、お子さんが機能するということです。

  • but there's lot of things your child can't do.

    でも、子供にはできないことがたくさんあります。

  • Your child will be withdrawn, socially inept,

    あなたの子供は内向的で社交的ではないでしょう。

  • obsessive, and have anxiety.

    強迫観念にとらわれ、不安を抱えている。

  • It's highly likely that your child will get worse,

    お子さんが悪くなる可能性が高いです。

  • so we recommend that you involve this service in your life constantly."

    "あなたの生活の中で、このサービスを常に巻き込んでいくことをお勧めします。"

  • I believe we need a rethink,

    再考が必要だと思います。

  • because Lisa is my mother.

    リサは私の母だから

  • And I am that child on the autism spectrum.

    私は自閉症スペクトラムの子です。

  • I am living and breathing her rethink.

    私は彼女の再考のために生きている。

  • What my mom did for me when I was growing up

    大人になって母がしてくれたこと

  • was she wielded this quiet magic around me.

    彼女は私の周りでこの静かな魔法を振り回していました。

  • She worked in a background to set up a network of people,

    彼女は人脈を整えるためのバックグラウンドで仕事をしていました。

  • of just family and friends that always helped me say

    いつも私を助けてくれた家族や友人たちの

  • "I can" when I found myself facing an insurmountable challenge.

    "乗り越えられない難題に直面した時に「できる」。

  • They were the people

    彼らは人々だった

  • that always worked on my gifts and helped me control my difficulties.

    それはいつも私の贈り物に働きかけてくれて、私の困難をコントロールしてくれていました。

  • She used my label "high-functioning autism"

    彼女は私の "高機能自閉症 "というレッテルを使っていました。

  • to alert my primary and secondary teachers

    初等・中等教育の先生に注意を促すために

  • of a type of learning environment that would most enable me.

    自分が最も可能になるような学習環境のタイプの

  • And with me,

    そして、私と一緒に。

  • every film she made me watch, every book she made me read,

    彼女に観させられた映画も、彼女に読ませられた本も。

  • had this "I can" enforced to it.

    この「できる」が強制されていました。

  • My childhood was full of stories of children that have overcome adversity.

    私の子供時代は、逆境を乗り越えてきた子供たちの話ばかりでした。

  • This was no dream for mom. I certainly was no picnic.

    ママにとっては夢ではなかった確かに私はピクニックではなかった。

  • I asked her recently just how bad did this get.

    最近聞いてみたんだけど、どのくらい悪くなったんだろう?

  • That's a very dangerous question to ask your mom.

    それはお母さんに聞くのはとても危険な質問です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • She said, "Well, Chris, there was your finger-painting."

    彼女は言った "クリス、あなたの指の絵があったわ"

  • And I thought, what was so different about my finger-painting?

    と思っていたのですが、指ぬきのどこがそんなに違うのでしょうか?

  • And she said, "Oh, Chris. You did finger painting with your own feces.

    すると彼女は「あ、クリス。自分のうんこでフィンガーペインティングをしたんだね。

  • (Gasps)

    (あえぎ)

  • And I thought, "Whoa." I had that reaction.

    "うわー "って思ったそんな反応をしてしまいました。

  • I was like, "How did you survive me?!"

    "どうやって生き延びたんだ?"って感じだった。

  • Because the thing she never let me do was she never let me opt out of things.

    彼女が私にさせてくれなかったのは、彼女が私に物事をオプトアウトさせてくれなかったことだからだ。

  • I never wanted to be social as a child,

    子供の頃から社交的になりたいと思ったことはありません。

  • and she just refused to let me use autism as an excuse.

    自閉症を言い訳にするのを拒否されたんだ

  • I would pay down on her by throwing these tantrums,

    癇癪を起こすことで、彼女に借りを返す。

  • and it weren't just typical child tantrums,

    それは典型的な子供の癇癪ではなかった。

  • it would involve the whole household.

    世帯全体を巻き込むことになります。

  • One of them was so bad

    そのうちの一人がとても悪かった

  • that simply to avoid throwing me through the window,

    私を窓から放り出すのを 避けるためです

  • she picked up my school bag, and threw it across my bedroom,

    彼女は私のランドセルを拾って寝室に放り投げました。

  • and it managed to go through my bedroom wall.

    寝室の壁を突き破ったんだ

  • And I shut up after that one.

    それ以降は黙ってた

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • When my family reached their exhaustion threshold,

    家族が疲労困憊の限界に達した時

  • I would be sent to the refuge of my grandparents.

    祖父母の避難所に送られてしまう。

  • And my grandparents had this wonderful impact on me.

    そして、祖父母は私にこの素晴らしい影響を与えてくれました。

  • My grandmother researched exercises that would help me with my anxiety,

    祖母は私の不安を解消してくれる体操を研究していました。

  • and I still use those exercises today.

    そして、私は今でもそのエクササイズを使っています。

  • My grandfather knew

    祖父は知っていた

  • that I would have a panic attack at the thought of playing social sports

    ソーシャルスポーツをしているとパニックになりそう

  • like football and cricket with other children,

    他の子供たちと一緒にサッカーやクリケットをするように

  • and so he worked on my motor skills.

    ということで、私の運動神経を鍛えてくれました。

  • He taught me sports in private

    プライベートでスポーツを教えてくれた

  • and even though he was permanently in a wheelchair,

    と、恒久的に車椅子に乗っていたにもかかわらず。

  • he used his mind and his humor

    才覚とユーモアを駆使して

  • to enable me to feel confident in my own skin.

    自分の肌に自信を持てるようになるために。

  • At school, it would've been safe to call me "nine going on ninety".

    学校では "9 going on ninety "と呼ぶのが無難だっただろう。

  • My brother, Steven, read Aladdin, and I read encyclopedias.

    弟のスティーブンはアラジンを読んでいて、私は百科事典を読んでいました。

  • I had this fascination with plotting the different royal families of Europe.

    ヨーロッパの様々な王族をプロットすることに魅力を感じていました。

  • I managed to do it from the 14th to 19th century.

    14世紀から19世紀までなんとかやりました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I had distilled it down

    私はそれを蒸留していた

  • into this incredibly visual and detailed chart.

    この信じられないほど視覚的で詳細なチャートに

  • When my grade 2 teacher, Miss Tey, set an assignment,

    小2のティー先生が課題を設定した時に

  • I matched this chart up to her

    このチャートを彼女に合わせてみました

  • because I just felt I have found a new way of seeing the last millennium.

    なぜなら、私はちょうど最後の千年紀を見る新しい方法を見つけたと感じたからです。

  • No wonder we had so many revolutions and conflicts;

    革命や紛争が多かったのも頷ける。

  • these families are way too connected, small community completely out of touch.

    これらの家族はあまりにもつながりが強すぎて、小さなコミュニティは完全に手がつけられていません。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • When I took it up to Miss Tey she said,

    私がそれをテイさんに持っていくと、彼女は言った。

  • "Oh goodness, Chris, doesn't this chart look interesting?

    " やれやれ、クリス、このチャート面白くなさそうじゃない?

  • But darling, our assignment is on winter."

    でも、ダーリン、私たちの課題は冬なのよ。"

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • "Would you mind drawing what winter looks like?"

    "冬の姿を描いてくれませんか?"

  • And I thought,

    と私は思った。

  • I've just done a PhD on the whole last millennium,

    この千年紀の全体についての博士号を取ったところです。

  • and you want me to draw clouds and rain?

    で、雲と雨を描けと?

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • That happened a lot to me at nine.

    9歳の時によくあったことだ

  • I would also tell stories about family trees that were broken.

    壊れた家系図の話もします。

  • When I was ten years old,

    私が10歳の時

  • and I was watching a midday movie at my grandparents house,

    と祖父母の家で真昼の映画を見ていました。

  • the film "Gone With the Wind" came on,

    映画「風と共に去りぬ」が公開されました。

  • and I couldn't cope with the fact

    私はその事実に対処することができず

  • that the daughter of the two main characters, Bonnie,

    主人公二人の娘、ボニーのこと。

  • had died in that horrible horse riding accident.

    は、あの恐ろしい乗馬事故で死んでしまったのです。

  • I thought, "What do you mean, the family tree's come to an end?

    と思ったら、家系図が終わったってどういうこと?

  • There's no sequel?

    続編はないのか?

  • At ten, I'm going to have to continue that work.

    10歳になったら、その仕事を続けなければならない。

  • And so I actually published a sequel to "Gone With the Wind".

    それで実際に『風と共に去りぬ』の続編を出したんです。

  • I even threw in a sex scene,

    セックスシーンも入れてみた

  • because that's what my autism in visual perception could do with sex ed.

    それは私の自閉症の視覚が性教育に影響を与えるからです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Raising me was also entertaining.

    私を育ててくれたことも楽しませてくれました。

  • I was very lucky at school

    私は学校でとても幸運だった

  • to have the advantage of making some great loyal friends.

    忠実な友人を作ることができるという利点があります。

  • At primary school, my friend, Erin could tell

    小学校の時、友達のエリンが言っていました

  • that my brain just absorbed every minor detail in class.

    私の脳は授業中の些細なことを全て吸収していた

  • She would help me to focus on classwork, because I often wouldn't get good marks

    授業に集中できるようにしてくれていました。

  • because I'd trail off into minor things.

    些細なことにまで踏み込んでしまうからだ。

  • She helped me focus.

    彼女は私が集中するのを助けてくれた。

  • When I was a teenager,

    私が10代の頃

  • it was my friend, Tim, that helped me pick up social cues

    友達のティムのおかげで 社会的な合図を拾うことができた

  • so that I was less vulnerable to bullying.

    いじめられっ子になりにくいように

  • Because, unfortunately, in Australia,

    なぜなら、残念ながらオーストラリアでは

  • 80% of secondary students with Asperger Syndrome

    中学生の8割がアスペルガー症候群

  • are targeted in schoolyard bullying.

    が校庭いじめの対象になっています。

  • When school was over, and I lost the safety net of my routine,

    学校が終わって、日課のセーフティネットを失った時。

  • because people on the spectrum love their routine,

    スペクトルの人は日常が好きだから

  • my friend, Alana, helped me focus on getting uni right,

    友人のアラナのおかげで、ユニを正しくすることに集中することができました。

  • on dealing with my anxiety,

    私の不安に対処するために

  • and looking at campaigning, volunteering

    選挙運動やボランティア活動を見て

  • and children's advocacy as a new focus for me.

    と子どもたちのアドボカシーが私の新たな焦点となりました。

  • One of my teachers was an extraordinary woman

    私の師匠の一人はとんでもない女性でした

  • named Christine Horvath

    クリスティン・ホーバス

  • who met me at 13 and could immediately tell

    13歳で出会ってすぐにわかる

  • that I just had this different mind, that I moved differently,

    私の心の動きが違っていただけだと

  • and that I had a way with words and memory and creativity.

    私には言葉と記憶と創造性の方法があったのです

  • What she did was she set up platforms for me to tell stories.

    彼女がしたことは、私が物語を語るためのプラットフォームを用意してくれたことです。

  • I moved from the kid that no one really knew how to take

    誰もが本当に取る方法を知らなかった子供から、私は移動しました。

  • to the respected story-teller in the schoolyard.

    校庭で尊敬する語り部に

  • And I've just been following that pathway ever since.

    それ以来、私はその道を辿ってきました。

  • When I think about this network that my mom started,

    母が始めたこのネットワークを考えると

  • I know what she saw, when those experts sat her down.

    専門家が彼女を座らせた時 彼女が見たものを知っている

  • When they said that I couldn't do things,

    物事ができないと言われた時に

  • she just chose to say, "But he can."

    "でも彼はできる "と言っただけだ

  • When they said I would struggle,

    苦労すると言われた時

  • she chose to think of strengths.

    彼女は強みを考えることを選んだ。

  • When they said that this would be ugly,

    これは醜いと言われると

  • she chose to say that this could also be beautiful.

    これもまた美しいかもしれないと彼女は選んだ。

  • There is another way of putting her rethink.

    彼女の再考には別の方法があります。

  • My friend and I agree that men are form Mars, women are from Venus,

    私の友人と私は、男性は火星から来て、女性は金星から来ているということに同意しています。

  • and autistic people are from Pluto.

    と自閉症の人は冥王星から来ています。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • We go to this next slide.

    次のスライドに行きます。

  • My brother on the left, Steven, the boys' boy; he's definitely from Mars.

    左の弟のスティーブンは男の子の男の子で、彼は間違いなく火星から来たんだ。

  • My sister Marian in the middle, she's from Venus.

    真ん中の妹のマリアンは金星の出身です。

  • And the boy on the right, with his socks pulled up

    右側の少年は、靴下を履いていて

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • with his shirt tucked in,

    シャツを着込んだ状態で

  • his top buttoned-up, and a combover without one hair out of place,

    彼のトップスはボタンアップして、髪の毛が一本も出ていない状態でコンバースをしています。

  • he is from Pluto.

    彼は冥王星出身です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I look at it now and I'm like, "I was just ahead of my time."

    今見ても "私は時代の先を行っていた "って感じです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I'm basically dawning the eight year old hipster.

    私は基本的に8歳のヒップスターをドーンとしています。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I mean, I basically paved the way.

    基本的には私が道を切り開いたんです。

  • But if we actually entertain this thought for a second,

    しかし、実際にこの考えを少し考えてみると

  • Pluto in our Solar System has this fundamentally unique orbit.

    太陽系の冥王星は、このような根本的にユニークな軌道を持っています。

  • It moves in a different way.

    違った動きをします。

  • And it is the same for children on the autism spectrum.

    そして、それは自閉症スペクトラムの子供たちも同じです。

  • Our orbit or our mind just moves differently.

    私たちの軌道や心の動きが違うだけです。

  • That doesn't mean there are things we can't do.

    だからといって、できないことがあるわけではありません。

  • Hell, we can do most things, we can even throw in a little extra.

    大抵のことはできるし、ちょっとしたおまけを入れることもできる。

  • Our mind can move like lightening on certain subjects.

    私たちの心は、特定のテーマでは雷のように動くことができます。

  • Language, spelling, and words were what did it for me.

    言葉、綴り、言葉が私のためにそれをしてくれました。

  • But our mind, our orbit, can sometimes take longer to adapt

    しかし、私たちの心は、私たちの軌道に適応するのに時間がかかることがあります。

  • in the area of social skills.

    ソーシャルスキルの分野で

  • But it does adapt.

    しかし、それは適応します。

  • I can't tell you how confusing my literal mind found sarcasm as a kid.

    子供の頃の私の文字通りの心がどれほど混乱していたかは言えませんが、皮肉を見つけたのは子供の頃でした。

  • Let's just say it could take a joke a long way.

    冗談でも良いから言っておこう。

  • I realised that when Sarah said to me,

    サラに言われて気がついた。

  • "I guess that having Asperger's means that there are things I can't do"

    "アスペルガーだからこそ できないことがあるんだろう"

  • that she is in an environment

    環境にいることを

  • where people stare at her different orbit and point at it as a deficit.

    人々が彼女の異なる軌道を見つめ、それを赤字と指摘するところ。

  • Whereas I came from an environment

    私がそのような環境から来たのに対して

  • where my brave mother removed my disorder

    勇敢な母が私の障害を取り除いたところ

  • by creating an environment free of this stigma that would inhibit me.

    この汚名から解放された環境を作ることで

  • Twenty years have passed since I was diagnosed.

    診断されてから20年が経過しました。

  • Experts no longer talk to parents like that,

    専門家は、もはや親にそんなことを言うことはありません。

  • health innovations have come a long way,

    健康革新は長い道のりを歩んできました。

  • but in my work I see this stigma holding kids back all the time

    しかし、私の仕事の中では、このような子供たちを遠ざけている汚名を常に目にしています。

  • and it's going to require all of us to do something about it.

    私たち全員で何とかしなければならないと思います。

  • Because we all are going to work with people on this spectrum.

    私たちは皆、このスペクトルの人たちと一緒に仕事をすることになるからです。

  • One in 88 children in USA are diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum.

    アメリカでは88人に1人が自閉症スペクトラムと診断されています。

  • And these children can bring extraordinary value to your life.

    そして、これらの子供たちは、あなたの人生に並外れた価値をもたらすことができます。

  • Here is Leonardo da Vinci.

    こちらはレオナルド・ダ・ヴィンチ。

  • Author Michael Gelb has researched da Vinci's life,

    著者のマイケル・ゲルブは、ダ・ヴィンチの生涯を研究しています。

  • looked at the way he gathered notes,

    とメモを集める様子を見ていました。

  • at his visual perception, his detail and focus,

    彼の視覚的な知覚、細部と焦点で。

  • and concluded that this man was far advanced on the autism spectrum.

    この男は自閉症スペクトラムで 遥かに進んでいると結論づけた

  • Look at the value he gave us. The Renaissance.

    彼が我々に与えた価値を見てください。ルネッサンスだ

  • The lesson from da Vinci's life

    ダ・ヴィンチの人生からの教訓

  • is not that every child on the autism spectrum

    自閉症スペクトラムのすべての子供がそうではありません

  • is going to be exactly like him.

    は、まさに彼のようになりそうです。

  • Because they can't be.

    なぜなら、彼らはありえないからだ。

  • You know, it's a very broad spectrum.

    視野が広いんですよね。

  • The lesson is, though,

    レッスンはともかく。

  • that this man had a network of people around him

    周りの人脈があったこと

  • that worked on his gifts and helped him control his difficulties.

    彼の才能に働きかけ、彼の困難をコントロールするのに役立った。

  • That network, his "I can" network,

    そのネットワーク、彼の「できる」ネットワーク。