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  • Today I am going to teach you how to administer a Vitamin B12 shot either for yourself or

  • as a care giver who might be administering it to patient. First of all I'm going to go

  • through the supplies that you need. You need an alcohol swab or if you're at home and you

  • don't have any alcohol swabs you can use your bottle of alcohol with a cotton ball. You

  • will need the syringe and you will of course need your Vitamin B12 that the physician called

  • in for you. The physician will probably have called in your syringe with your needles also.

  • With my patient population I do prefer the smaller needle which is a 25 gauge, one inch

  • needle. And actually that is the size of the needle that they use to give you your seasonal

  • flu shot. So for all of you that have needle phobia it is OK to use a smaller needle. At

  • home I'm going to use my little skin pad but you can also practice on an orange or any

  • kind of fruit. A lemon would work or even an apple. I like to use the orange and the

  • lemons only because they are softer and it has more of a skin like feeling. So what you'll

  • do is go ahead and just open your alcohol swab and get it ready or get your cotton ball

  • ready. I'm going to go ahead and take out the syringe and all of the syringes that you

  • use will always have numbers on it and the most common doses of Vitamin B12 are what

  • we call 1cc or 1ml. Now according to your physician he may choose to give you a different

  • dose. On the 3cc syringe it is numbered from a half cc to 3ml or 3cc. You will always focus

  • on the 1. And then you will have of course your vial of Vitamin B12 and on your bottle

  • it will probably not say Vitamin B12 it will say a long difficult name and it's called

  • Cyanocobalamin. So what we'll do is go ahead and prep the skin. So you can practice this

  • with your orange. And you go ahead and take your alcohol and you will clean just the surface

  • of the skin just rub it a little bit. You might want to kind of fan it and let it dry

  • a little bit because sometimes when you inject the needle into the skin it might cause a

  • little bit of a stinging or burning from the alcohol not from the medication. You go ahead

  • and just pull the cap straight off of your needle and go ahead and pull what we call

  • the plunger that's this little thing sticking out here. And hold onto the barrel of the

  • syringe and you will simply pull the plunger down to the number one. There is a little

  • black rubber stopper in this syringe and it is sometimes kind of hard for you to see but

  • you will actually pull that rest of the black stopper all of the way down until you reach

  • the top of the line. In this one there is actually two layers of lines and you can measure

  • it by stopping at the top layer of the plunger not by the point of the plunger. So basically

  • you are going to draw in 1cc of air into this syringe. And then you will take your bottle.

  • And when it's brand new you will have a plastic cap on it which is a protective cap and you

  • will just simply pull it off you will also take your alcohol and clean that off. Even

  • though the first use it is clean underneath that plastic cap it's OK just to get in the

  • habit of cleaning the top of the stopper because each time you give the injection you will

  • need to clean it just too basically clean off any um. It's really not a sterilization,

  • alcohol is not a sterilization product but it will just clean off the surface of any

  • kind of dirt or anything that might have gotten on top off it. And then you will simply leave

  • it on a surface clean surface and a flat table or whatever you feel comfortable with and

  • you will go ahead and just inject the needle in through the rubber stopper at the top of

  • the bottle and each time you practice this and the more shots you give you will actually

  • develop your own technique and so you don't have to be exact on what I'm showing you.

  • And it’s just whatever you feel comfortable doing on how you need to hold your syringe

  • and how you need to hold your bottle and actually when you inject it into the somebody. So,

  • I'm going to hold the bottle and I'm just going to take my dominant hand, and of course

  • I'm left handed. And, I'm going to push the plunger down. So basically I'm pushing the

  • air into the bottle. So now you're ready to withdraw the medication and you're going to

  • simply just turn up the bottle upside down, hold up your syringe and as I said before

  • everybody is going to develop their own technique I actually just grasp the syringe with my

  • pinky and fourth digit and then I have it held like this and I'm stabilizing it up here.

  • And I'm going to pull this plunger back and I'm going to draw past the 1. And the reason

  • for that is just so you can actually, you're going to have an air bubble probably here

  • at the top of the syringe and then you can draw more than you need and then push it back

  • up and by pushing that back up to the one you actually push the air bubble out. And

  • in this one it is out and sometimes it's real common that you will have still some air bubble

  • in it. If that happens you can actually take your finger and tap it or for me it’s easier

  • I can just stabilize the bottle and stabilize the syringe and you can tap it on the side

  • of the table and that brings those bubbles to the top of the surface and gets rid of

  • them. So now you are ready to just pull the syringe straight back out. So we've got the

  • medicine drawn up and now we're ready to give the injection. And we've already cleaned the

  • surface and so what I'm going to do is I'm going to make a C with my thumb and index

  • finger and basically put it down on the skin and kind of just pull the skin taught and

  • you don't necessarily, this is a muscle shot and so you don't have to pinch up on the skin

  • or anything. So I'm just going to kind of pull it taught and then I'm going to take

  • this and you can hold it some people hold it like a dart like they're going to throw

  • a dart, you can hold it somehow like a pencil if you're going to hold a pencil and write

  • so again whatever you feel comfortable with. So as I'm going in I'm going to go straight

  • in basically at a 90 degree angle and I'm going to go ahead and just push in and you're

  • going to go all the way down to the hub of the needle basically you are going to cover

  • up all the needle with the skin. So here I actually take this C and I brace my pinky

  • against the skin and I grab it with my thumb and index finger. That way it is stable and

  • you're not wobbling around as you're pushing down into the medicine and you won’t hopefully

  • it won’t be painful for the patient if you do that. So' I've got it stable here where

  • I'm not going to move the syringe just as I'm pushing the medicine in. So then I just

  • take this free hand and I grab it here and I push the medicine into the skin. And you

  • don't have to go real slow, and you don't have to go real fast, if you just go at a

  • gentle pace then you basically are done and you let go of the syringe at the surface of

  • the skin and you just pull straight back out, and youre done. You can actually take the

  • alcohol swab if you want and go ahead and massage that area. It actually helps the medicine

  • get more absorbed into the body. And if it’s bleeding you might want to apply a band aid.

  • Some people don't bleed, some people do bleed. A lot of people who are on blood thinners

  • might bleed and probably do need a band aid. The most common area for a patient if they

  • are giving it to themselves would be on the outside of your thigh. On the lateral side

  • of your thigh. If you take your hand and you go from your knee up to your groin area and

  • you divide that into three sections it's going to be that middle third section where you

  • can get that shot to. After you complete the injection then you need to make sure you properly

  • dispose of the needle. And you can use many household items such as a milk carton with

  • a lid. You can actually use a liquid detergent bottle that has a lid or you can also use

  • a coffee can with a lid. As long as they have lids and they are secure where people can't

  • reach in and get them and or they can puncture through the surface of the container.

Today I am going to teach you how to administer a Vitamin B12 shot either for yourself or

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B1 中級

筋肉内ビタミンB12注射の与え方 (How to give Intramuscular Vitamin B12 Injections)

  • 36 1
    Pedroli Li に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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