Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I guess the story actually has to start

    話は

  • maybe back in the the 1960s,

    1960年に始まります

  • when I was seven or eight years old,

    私が7歳か8歳の時です

  • watching Jacques Cousteau documentaries on the living room floor

    リビングルームで クストーのドキュメンタリーを見ながら

  • with my mask and flippers on.

    水中マスクと足ヒレをつけて

  • Then after every episode, I had to go up to the bathtub

    番組の後に 私は湯船に入りました

  • and swim around the bathtub and look at the drain,

    湯船で泳ぎ 排水口を見つめました

  • because that's all there was to look at.

    排水口しか見るものがなかったからです

  • And by the time I turned 16,

    16才の時

  • I pursued a career in marine science,

    私は 海洋科学の道を選びました

  • in exploration and diving,

    探査やダイビングを

  • and lived in underwater habitats, like this one off the Florida Keys,

    そしてフロリダキーズ沖などの 水中居住室で暮らました

  • for 30 days total.

    30日間

  • Brian Skerry took this shot. Thanks, Brian.

    ブライアン・スケリーがこの写真を撮りました  ありがとう ブライアン

  • And I've dived in deep-sea submersibles around the world.

    そして 私は世界各地の海を 深海潜水艇で潜りました

  • And this one is the deepest diving submarine in the world,

    そしてこれは 世界で最も深くもぐれる

  • operated by the Japanese government.

    日本の潜水艇です

  • And Sylvia Earle and I

    そしてシルビア・アールと私は

  • were on an expedition in this submarine

    この潜水艇での探検に参加しました

  • 20 years ago in Japan.

    20年前 日本で

  • And on my dive, I went down 18,000 feet,

    水深5400メートルまで潜りました

  • to an area that I thought

    そこは

  • would be pristine wilderness area on the sea floor.

    手付かずの 未知の海底であると思っていました

  • But when I got there, I found

    しかしそこに着いたとき

  • lots of plastic garbage and other debris.

    たくさんのプラスチックゴミや 他のゴミを見つけました

  • And it was really a turning point in my life,

    私は楽しく科学し 探索だけをしているわけにいかないことに

  • where I started to realize

    気づきました

  • that I couldn't just go have fun doing science and exploration.

    それは私の人生の転機となりました

  • I needed to put it into a context.

    全体を見る必要がありました

  • I needed to head towards conservation goals.

    環境保護のゴールに向かって 進む必要がありました

  • So I began to work

    そこで私は

  • with National Geographic Society and others

    ナショナルジオグラフィック協会や 他の協会と共同で

  • and led expeditions to Antarctica.

    南極探検に参加しました

  • I led three diving expeditions to Antarctica.

    3度の南極ダイビング探索に参加したのです

  • Ten years ago was a seminal trip,

    10年前 発端となる旅でした

  • where we explored that big iceberg, B-15,

    私たちはB-15と呼ばれる 大きな氷山を探索しました

  • the largest iceberg in history, that broke off the Ross Ice Shelf.

    ロス棚氷から崩れ落ちた史上最大の氷山です

  • And we developed techniques

    氷山の内側と下に潜る

  • to dive inside and under the iceberg,

    新しい技術を開発しをました

  • such as heating pads on our kidneys

    腎臓を温めるパッドを

  • with a battery that we dragged around,

    電池を引きずって使うようなもので

  • so that, as the blood flowed through our kidneys,

    血液が腎臓を流れるときに

  • it would get a little boost of warmth

    私たちの体に戻って行く前に

  • before going back into our bodies.

    少し温められるようになっています

  • But after three trips to Antarctica,

    しかし 3回の南極への探索の後

  • I decided that it might be nicer to work in warmer water.

    温かい水の中で仕事をしたほうがよいと 思うようになりました

  • And that same year, 10 years ago,

    その同じ年 10年前

  • I headed north to the Phoenix Islands.

    私はフェニックス諸島に向いました

  • And I'm going to tell you that story here in a moment.

    これから そのお話をしたいと思います

  • But before I do, I just want you to ponder this graph for a moment.

    その前に このグラフをご覧ください

  • You may have seen this in other forms,

    別の形でご覧になっているかもしれません

  • but the top line is the amount of protected area

    上の線は 全地球の陸上での

  • on land, globally,

    保護地区の合計です

  • and it's about 12 percent.

    約12%です

  • And you can see that it kind of hockey sticks up

    ホッケースティックの形をしています

  • around the 1960s and '70s,

    1960年代と70年代から

  • and it's on kind of a nice trajectory right now.

    現在にかけて増加傾向です

  • And that's probably because

    たぶん

  • that's when everybody got aware of the environment

    誰もが環境に注目するようになり

  • and Earth Day

    地球の日や

  • and all the stuff that happened in the '60s with the Hippies and everything

    ヒッピーなどと共に 60年代に起こったすべてのことは

  • really did, I think, have an affect on global awareness.

    地球環境への意識を高めたと思います

  • But the ocean-protected area

    しかし 海の保護海域は

  • is basically flat line

    基本的には変化なしです

  • until right about now -- it appears to be ticking up.

    現在わずかに増加しているかもしれません

  • And I do believe that we are at the hockey stick point

    海洋の保護海域は

  • of the protected area in the ocean.

    これから増加すると思います

  • I think we would have gotten there a lot earlier

    地上で起ったことから

  • if we could see what happens in the ocean

    海で何が起こるかを見ることができたなら

  • like we can see what happens on land.

    もっと早くそうなったと思います

  • But unfortunately, the ocean is opaque,

    しかし不幸にも海洋は不透明で

  • and we can't see what's going on.

    何が起こっているのかを見ることはできません

  • And therefore we're way behind on protection.

    したがって 海洋の保護は 陸の保護に後れを取っています

  • But scuba diving, submersibles

    しかし スキューバダイビング ​​潜水艇

  • and all the work that we're setting about to do here

    私たちが行おうとしているすべての事は

  • will help rectify that.

    その是正に役立つでしょう

  • So where are the Phoenix Islands?

    フェニックス諸島はどこでしょう?

  • They were the world's largest marine-protected area

    そこは世界最大の海洋保護区でした

  • up until last week

    先週までは

  • when the Chagos Archipelago was declared.

    今週からはチャゴス諸島が最大です

  • It's in the mid-Pacific. It's about five days from anywhere.

    それは中央太平洋にあります それはどこからでも約5日の距離です

  • If you want to get to the Phoenix Islands,

    フェニックス諸島に行く場合

  • it's five days from Fiji,

    フィジーから5日

  • it's five days from Hawaii, it's five days from Samoa.

    ハワイから5日 サモアからも5日です

  • It's out in the middle of the Pacific,

    太平洋の真ん中です

  • right around the Equator.

    赤道直下です

  • I had never heard of the islands 10 years ago,

    10年前には 島のことを聞いたことがありませんでした

  • nor the country, Kiribati, that owns them,

    それらを所有している国 キリバスについてもです

  • till two friends of mine who run a liveaboard dive boat in Fiji

    フィジーで船中泊ダイビングボートを経営する 私の二人の友人が

  • said, "Greg, would you lead a scientific expedition up to these islands?

    これらの島へ 科学的な探検をする気はあるかいと尋ねるまで

  • They've never been dived."

    彼らはここで潜ったことがありませんでした

  • And I said, "Yeah.

    私は「うん」と答えました

  • But tell me where they are and the country that owns them."

    「でも島の場所と所属する国を教えてくれよ」

  • So that's when I first learned of the Islands

    始めに島のことを知ったとき

  • and had no idea what I was getting into.

    どんなことになるか想像もつきませんでした

  • But I was in for the adventure.

    でも私は探索に興味を持っていました

  • Let me give you a little peek here of the Phoenix Islands-protected area.

    ここでフェニックス諸島保護区を 少し紹介しましょう

  • It's a very deep-water part of our planet.

    地球の最も深海の部分です

  • The average depths are about 12,000 ft.

    平均水深は約3600メートルです

  • There's lots of seamounts in the Phoenix Islands,

    フェニックス諸島には多くの海山があります

  • which are specifically part of the protected area.

    これは特に保護された部分です

  • Seamounts are important for biodiversity.

    海山は生物多様性のために重要です

  • There's actually more mountains in the ocean than there are on land.

    海洋には実際陸地より山が多く存在しています

  • It's an interesting fact.

    興味深い事です

  • And the Phoenix Islands is very rich in those seamounts.

    フェニックス諸島には海山がたくさんあるのです

  • So it's a deep -- think about it in a big three-dimensional space,

    深い 三次元空間を想像してみて下さい

  • very deep three-dimensional space

    非常に深い三次元空間です

  • with herds of tuna, whales,

    マグロ クジラの群れと

  • all kinds of deep sea marine life

    いろいろな深海の海洋生物

  • like we've seen here before.

    これまでの講演で見ましたね

  • That's the vessel that we took up there

    これが研究のために 早い段階から

  • for these studies, early on,

    私たちが使った船です

  • and that's what the Islands look like -- you can see in the background.

    後ろに見える これが島です

  • They're very low to the water,

    水面すれすれで

  • and they're all uninhabited, except one island

    1つを除いてすべて無人島です

  • has about 35 caretakers on it.

    そこには約35人の管理者が住んでいます

  • And they've been uninhabited for most of time

    長い間無人島でした

  • because even in the ancient days,

  • these islands were too far away

    広く太平洋を旅していた

  • from the bright lights of Fiji and Hawaii and Tahiti

    古代ポリネシア人にとってさえ

  • for those ancient Polynesian mariners

    これらの島は

  • that were traversing the Pacific so widely.

    フィジー、ハワイ、タヒチから遠く離れていました

  • But we got up there,

    私たちはそこに行ったのです

  • and I had the unique and wonderful scientific opportunity and personal opportunity

    今までダイビングされたことのない場所に行って

  • to get to a place that had never been dived

    ユニークで素晴らしい科学的 個人的な チャンスだったのです

  • and just get to an island and go, "Okay, where are we going to dive?

    島に着いて「どこで私たちはダイビングしよう?」

  • Let's try there,"

    「そこにしよう」

  • and then falling into the water.

    そして潜る

  • Both my personal and my professional life changed.

    私的生活と専門家としての生活 両方が変わりました

  • Suddenly, I saw a world

    突然

  • that I had never seen before in the ocean --

    私は海洋で 今まで見たことがなかった世界を見ました

  • schools of fish that were so dense

    密集した魚の群れは

  • they dulled the penetration of sunlight from the surface,

    海面からの光の通過を妨げ

  • coral reefs that were continuous

    ぎっしりと連続した

  • and solid and colorful,

    カラフルなサンゴ礁

  • large fish everywhere,

    いたるところにいる大きな魚

  • manta rays.

    マンタエイ

  • It was an ecosystem. Parrotfish spawning --

    ブダイの産卵 それは一つの生態系でした

  • this is about 5,000 longnose parrotfish spawning

    これは 約5千尾の ロ​​ングノーズブダイの産卵です

  • at the entrance to one of the Phoenix Islands.

    フェニックスアイランドの入り口で

  • You can see the fish are balled up

    この魚が交尾しているのを見ることができます

  • and then there's a little cloudy area there

    生殖のために卵と精子を交換し

  • where they're exchanging the eggs and sperm for reproduction --

    海水が濁ります

  • events that the ocean is supposed to do,

    海洋で行なわれるイベントです

  • but struggles to do in many places now

    しかし人間の活動のため

  • because of human activity.

    多くの場所で行うのが難しくなっています

  • The Phoenix Islands and all the equatorial parts of our planet

    フェニックス諸島と赤道の部分は

  • are very important for tuna fisheries,

    マグロ漁業にとって非常に重要です

  • especially this yellowfin tuna that you see here.

    このキハダマグロ

  • Phoenix Islands is a major tuna location.

    フェニックス諸島は 主要なマグ​​ロ漁場です

  • And sharks -- we had sharks on our early dives,

    そして サメも 私たちのダイビングの初めのころ

  • up to 150 sharks at once,

    一度に最大150頭のサメに出会いました

  • which is an indication

    これは

  • of a very, very healthy, very strong, system.

    非常に健康で強力な生態系であることを 示しています

  • So I thought the scenes

    だから私は

  • of never-ending wilderness

    終わることのない野生の情景が

  • would go on forever,

    永遠に続くだろうと思いました

  • but they did finally come to an end.

    しかしそうはいきませんでした

  • And we explored the surface of the Islands as well --

    そして私たちはさらに島の地上を探検しました

  • very important bird nesting site,

    重要な鳥の巣作りの場所

  • some of the most important bird-nesting sites in the Pacific, in the world.

    世界で 太平洋の中で 最も重要な鳥の巣作りの場所です

  • And we finished our trip.

    そして旅を終えました

  • And that's the area again.

    これがそのエリアです

  • You can see the Islands -- there are eight islands --

    8つの島があります

  • that pop out of the water.

    水から顔を出しています

  • The peaks that don't come out of the water are the seamounts.

    水から出ていないのは海山です

  • Remember, a seamount turns into an island when it hits the surface.

    海山が海面から出ると島になります

  • And what's the context of the Phoenix Islands?

    フェニックス諸島周囲の状況は?

  • Where do these exist?

    どこにあるのか?

  • Well they exist in the Republic of Kiribati,

    キリバス共和国にあって

  • and Kiribati is located in the Central Pacific

    キリバスは中部太平洋に位置しています

  • in three island groups