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  • Hello everyone, nice to see you around and welcome to today's mobility workshop!

  • We'll have some time to analyze your squatting technique.

  • Our first goal will be to improve your squat performance.

  • I'll show you some procedures how to improve your squats within just a few minutes.

  • We'll analyze each other individually, I'll observe your squat, I'll also test your joints..

  • ..ankle joint, knee joint, hip joint and spine. You'll improve your own squat for sure.

  • First of all, all of you are wearing different shoes.. take them off for now, you won't need them.

  • That's how we are getting started.

  • We'll exclusively focus on mobility today. It's not about flexibility or stretching but active mobility.

  • So, some of you might be flexible enough to do the splits but that's not of use for your daily routine.

  • Instead, we're talking about the active mobility you're effectively using for your sport.

  • Since squats has certain demands for your muscles and joints, we'll be taking a closer look on that.

  • Therefore, talking while standing is easy, so let's get into a deep squat and keep talking.

  • Consider it a little contest! Squat now. I can already see how deep you get and how comfortable you are..

  • ..how your heels act and how your upper body positions. Hold that position for the next minutes.

  • Anyone got sore leg muscles?

  • You must've been working out yesterday then. -Yes! -Good, well keep going anyway!

  • I can already observe different squat positions. Especially your feet placement differs from each other.

  • I'll take a closer look on all of you.

  • At first, why are we doing a mobility workshop?

  • Mainly it's about.. wait, you already got problems or do you need more room?

  • Whatever! In the end increasing mobility results in improved performance.

  • That means, if a random person has issues taking a glass out of a cupboard because of shoulders issues..

  • ..that person needs to improve on his mobility first of all to perform that certain move.

  • Basically speaking, that person needs to improve performance.

  • If you have issues performing a deep squat because you can't squat 'ass to grass'..

  • ..it's again about increasing mobility to improve your performance.

  • Performance is key. It's a means to an end.

  • Once you do a solid deep squat 'ass to grass', you've done your part on mobility for squats.

  • Now, stability would be your next step. That means, enhancing your muscles takes place.

  • At first, securing that mobility is your highest priority.

  • Let me show you how deeply connected mobility and stability are with each other:

  • So, two of you get close to my side please.

  • You're smiling so much, I'll definitely take you. And.. Nick, you as well.

  • That's on purpose. Get over here and perform a deep squat. Keep a distance of one meter.

  • So, I took the two of you on purpose. For you, you are comfortable with your squat.

  • For Nick though, he has issues connecting his heels with the ground. He lacks mobility for a deep squat.

  • I'll now demonstrate how your stability depends on your mobility by trying to make you lose balance.

  • Very easy though, I'll push you a bit and you try to keep your balance.

  • Be safe, don't let me push you. He stabilizes himself nicely and keeps the balance.

  • I do the same pushes, but it's much harder for him because he can't connect his heels to the ground.

  • That's why he needs his hands to balance himself but it's tough for him.

  • Good, thanks. It's only to show how hard it can be to keep stability.

  • Thanks, you can take your places again.

  • That means, mobility first - stability after.

  • We'll be taking an individual look upon you. If it's about your ankle joint..

  • ..are you exhausted already?! -Yep. -Get into your deep squat again.

  • So, we'll be having a closer look on your joints to see what works and what doesn't. That's first.

  • I just said mobility is your key to performance. Now let me ask you this. Does anyone of you go jogging?

  • Nice, so we got some runners in here. Before you start running, would you warm up your wrist joints?

  • You'd do it, really? -I do an overall warmup, yes. -Sounds good. Who would not do it? Ok, you wouldn't.

  • Sure, generally why would you warm up your wrists when you're mainly training your legs?

  • So, for now I want to demonstrate you that warming up your wrists can be of importance for squats.

  • Can you come in front and lay down on your back? You said you wouldn't warm up your wrists.

  • Feet here and lay on your back. Stretch your legs. Relax yourself now.

  • Well, wrists shouldn't be of importance for squats right?

  • Usually you'd warm up ankle, knee and hip joint because they're directly involved in a squat.

  • I will do a muscle functionality test right now. I want to test your hip flexor.

  • You don't have any issues with your hip, right? -No. -Good.

  • I will simply test his strength now. I'll position your leg and you keep it like this, please.

  • His quadriceps and hip flexor keep that position for him.

  • What I'll do now, is to grab your leg and push it to the ground.

  • What you'll do, is to make use of your hip flexor and prevent my attempt. Just hold your position.

  • Good, ready? -Yes. -I'll try now.

  • Ok, relax again. Worked for him, right? His power was present.

  • As you saw, I really tried though! In the end, it's his huge hip flexor against my gentle hands.

  • Lay down and relax. I'll need your foot now and tell you guys later what I did.

  • Just lay down and relax for now, think of something else.

  • Does that hurt? -No. -I'll tell you soon what I am doing right now, it's not uncomfortable.

  • Good, bring your leg in position once again. Does your ankle joint hurt? -No.

  • Try to keep your position. And once more. Come on, try a third time!

  • He can't keep the balance! Ok, relax yourself.

  • Was it harder this time? -Definitely.. -I know.

  • Is your foot alright? -Yes.

  • We'll repeat the process once again! Keep your position.

  • And relax, easier this time? -Yes, for sure.

  • First time, worked very well. Second time it was way worse and for the third time it worked again!

  • So, I obviously did something with his ankle joint to reduce his performance and power.

  • I had no chance to activate my strength at all. Even though I tried very hard I simply couldn't withstand.

  • So somehow his ankle joint is connected in that process.

  • If your ankle joint isn't mobile enough, your hip and overall performance might suffer.

  • Your leg and hip is well again, right? -Yes.

  • So earlier I've asked you, if you'd warm up your wrists before running or doing squats.

  • Give me your thumb please. I could do the same with your jawbone, but.. nevermind!

  • If it hurts, just yell.

  • You alright? -Yes.

  • And again, keep your position.

  • And again.

  • And once more.

  • It's even worse now, isn't it? His thumb actually has a huge influence on his hip flexor.

  • Ok, I'll loosen your thumb now.

  • Ready? Hold position.

  • And loosen once again!

  • That was totally different again. -You feel it, right? -I sure do.

  • So, again, would you warm up and mobilize your wrists before squats? Yes, in theory you should.

  • I'll explain now what I did.. you can stay here if you want. -Sure.

  • I basically compressed his ankle joint.

  • At the moment I compress his ankle joint, his central nervous system (CNS) gets on alert that something's wrong.

  • A compression could always mean an injury.

  • If I have an injury somewhere, my muscularity will always adapt and lower the power output.

  • That means my performance gets into a 'stand by' mode. So that's basically what just happened.

  • A compression at his ankle joint resulted in an alert to your CNS to decrease performance of your whole body.

  • Not only ankle joint and hip flexor, but also thumb and hip flexor are connected.

  • By compressing thumb or ankle joint I decreased his hip flexor strength by a huge amount.

  • That's mean because if you'd have an hand, neck or any injury, there's a risk your whole performance suffers.

  • Again, improving mobility results in enhanced performance.

  • If I have an injury or compression, I need to activate that joint to recover my mobility and functionality.

  • That's the main reason and topic for today.

  • I'll show you how to effectively activate your joints and make you improve your individual performance.

  • Thanks for helping out, you may go back.

  • Good, assessments next. First of all we'll observe each other's technique.

  • For now, I need someone to perform a deep squat for us. Arms in front, do a squat and get up - simple.

  • After that, I'll tell you what it's about.

  • I need to get up first.. -No problem! The others can have a more relaxed seat now. Whatever you want.

  • You told us to sit in a deep squat! -Yea, you held out.

  • Need to spread my blood. -I'll observe from above.

  • Good, one more please.

  • Very good. At first, I want to point out his neck position.

  • He had a neutral neck position, is that good or bad for squats? What do people do when deadlifting?

  • Some usually overstretch their cervical spine and keep the head very high. -Exactly, is that good or bad?

  • If it's bad, why is it bad? The question is, can our overall performance suffer from overstretching?

  • For example, when doing a back squat and you keep your chin very high and overstretch..

  • ..does that improve or decrease my performance? Or does it not matter at all? -Decreases..

  • Yes, it most likely decreases. I'll show you an example to see for yourself if it decreases or not.

  • It's good you're next to me already since you're very strong and got decent neck muscles.

  • I'll also try this with another one later. It's basically a strength test, a competition!

  • In the end, it's both my biceps against your triceps. Your arms are stronger than mine so let's see.

  • First of all, do you think an extensor or a flexor is the superior of both muscles?

  • Think of your arms or your legs. Extensor or flexor? -Extensor.. -Correct, mostly the extensor.

  • I'd have thought different about your legs.. -The extensor is the stronger one. -Yes? -Yea it is.

  • I mean, there can be a minus development or heavy disbalance but that is very unlikely.

  • Because the triceps is bigger naturally? -Yes but it's also easier for your CNS for to push than to pull.

  • Okay we'll do this small game now: Your triceps against my two biceps.

  • You'll just stand straight and fixate a certain spot on the other side. Keep your head neutral.

  • Apply a hip wide stand. Not that wide, you don't have that hip! -Who knows..?!

  • Now, stretch your right arm in front of you and spread your fingers. Elbow is stretched, too.

  • Good thing is, he has very muscular arms. Maybe I won't achieve what I want to demonstrate..

  • You're looking for excuses! -Yes, before we even started!

  • Good, by spreading his fingers and stretching his elbow, he additionally activates his triceps.

  • His cervical spine is neutral, chin slightly inward.

  • Now, this is the most stable position you can have from a power perspective.

  • I'll grab around and try to flex your arm. You'll try to keep your arm stretched. Ready? -Yes.

  • Did you hear my elbow clicking? -Yes I repositioned it. Good, relax now.

  • That was demanding and it didn't even work. He hold his position.

  • You alright? -Let's see! -At the end of they day.. Now, let's imagine a bad technique.

  • You're doing a back squat and overstretch your head touching your neck. Sadly, that's common.

  • People who are out of power tend to raise their chin and create an upward movement that way. -Yes..

  • Once I tell you to put your head behind touching your neck, you'll start fixating the top.

  • Same arm? -Yes, stretch it. Don't tell me you're exhausted! -No, it's fine.

  • Stretch arm and fingers, look in front at first. I'll grab now. Head to your neck, now.

  • What the hell just happened..? -It's all right! -Amazing. -It's like I turned you off instantly! -Exactly.

  • My tension was gone completely. What's the reason for that, my spine position? -That's it, exactly!

  • For those who are interested, it's called the 'arthrokinetic reflex'.

  • So, once you put your head behind to touch your neck, you create a strain within in your cervical spine.

  • That means your vertebra collide and your CNS gets alerted that your cervical spine isn't fully protected.

  • As a result, your performance heavily decreases.

  • Sorry for interrupting.. but isn't that the opposite to how many weightlifters actually lift weights?

  • Since most of them get their heads behind and look to the top.. -You're right.

  • So if they'd get rid of that, could they increase their performance? -Yes, in theory..

  • ..but there are exceptions. There was a chance your stability wouldn't care about your head position.

  • For example, people with extreme neck muscles are more resistent to an insecure head position.

  • It really depends upon your individual athlete. Still, I'd test that with every single one of you.

  • Anyway, thank you. -Thank you, too!

  • So first of all, it's about how to ideally position your cervical spine.

  • When athletes do an upward movement at squats or deadlift and raise their head to the top..

  • ..it's actually not the head itself that determines the movement but his eyes.

  • I got another small test for you.. but wait until I'm done talking please.

  • Try to get your chin on your chest while you try to look at the top - simultaneously. Try it.

  • Feels awkward, right? It doesn't work properly because your eyes determine your movement.

  • So when you do squats or deadlift and raise your chin and head, it's because your eyes fixate the top.

  • In conclusion, your eye movement makes the upward movement easier, not your head movement.

  • These are the basics of why mobility and stabilizing our spine is of importance.

  • Next, we'll be doing an assessment of your individual joints to see how they behave.

  • Patrick describes technique from a totally different point of view.

  • He does an in depth analysis you yourself didn't think of yet.

  • Also, he demonstrates his knowledge directly via any athlete. I'm surprised and didn't expect that.

  • I told you earlier that you will be able to improve performance within minutes, let's continue.

  • Performance is strength and mobility.

  • To produce strength with its full range of movement you'll need mobility.

  • Now, I'll show you how to improve your mobility and range of motion within 30 seconds.

  • I need one volunteer that's not too mobile with his legs.

  • So if you're able to do the splits, you're not eligible for this now!

  • Rather someone with the mobility of a soccer player, that would be ideal. Who wants?

  • All right, good. Come here and lay down on your back.

  • We'll do a muscle functionality test right now and check his 'before and after' results.

  • Stretch your legs.

  • I want to check your current range of motion first. Then, I'll show you a manual method.

  • After that, we'll check his range of motion again and compare results.

  • At first, I'll try and raise his leg.

  • You guys have a look yourself. See if you can observe a mobility improvement for him during the test.

  • Keep your right leg relaxed. Lay down relaxed.

  • Relax, relax, relax..

  • He's blocking right now, you notice the leg position, right?

  • A bit higher but that's it, good.

  • His muscles exhaust and block so that's why he can't move any further. Let's check his abduction next.

  • Make the leg rotate outwards, knee is stretched.. Now it's blocking once again and that's basically it.

  • You see the leg position? Remember the angle.

  • Good, have your legs relaxed. Now, I'll get to your jawbone.

  • You've most likely been to the orthodontist or dentist already, right?

  • My physical therapist noticed that loosening my musculature around the jawbone improves my back performance.

  • Sounds good, let's see if I can improve your range of motion that way as well!

  • Usually I'd use some massage oil, but.. let's abandon that idea. Might be a bit rough now, though.

  • If it hurts, just yell.

  • Is it ok? Hurts a bit right? -Yes.. I also have an issue with grinding my teeth.

  • Maybe I'll solve that issue as well! -I need to survive first..

  • We're almost done, as I said, a very fast improvement! We don't want to spend 10 minutes doing this.

  • That's almost 20 seconds now, right? -Feels like have an hour to me.. -We're done, that's it!

  • Let's check your range of motion again. You tell me now, if he has improved.

  • See it? It got better, right?

  • Let's check his abduction. Improved as well, right?

  • Is your jawbone fine again? -Yes.

  • That was a demonstration of instant performance. Took me 20 seconds to improve his range of motion.

  • So what did I actually do?

  • Might surprise you but, why it worked was because I inflicted pain onto him.

  • You might think there is a deeper connection with his jawbone and his leg muscles, his adductor..

  • But the moment I inflict pain onto his jawbone, the jawbone is a very sensitive area by the way,

  • his brain enters a fight of flight mode. He fights the pain or he flees from it, either or.

  • If you choose to fight, your body will release testosterone, enhance your mobility and range of motion.

  • As soon as I inflict pain onto him he either deals with it or runs away.

  • It's not like he had a choice this time. -Well.. -Sure, you could have in theory.

  • Also, he focussed on the pain inflicted. What did you think of when I treated your jawbone?

  • I thought about surviving.. -Surviving! He had no choice other than dealing with the pain inflicted.

  • That means he was focussed and concentrated. So his pain helped him focus.