Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • (Nature sounds)

    (自然界の音)

  • When I first began recording wild soundscapes

    私が最初に自然界のサウンドスケープを

  • 45 years ago,

    録音しはじめた45年前には

  • I had no idea that ants,

    アリや昆虫の幼虫や

  • insect larvae, sea anemones and viruses

    イソギンチャクやウィルスなどが 固有の音を発しているとは

  • created a sound signature.

    思いもしませんでした しかし実際に彼らは

  • But they do.

    音を発しているのです

  • And so does every wild habitat on the planet,

    地球のどこであれ 自然界は皆そうです

  • like the Amazon rainforest you're hearing behind me.

    今聞こえているのはアマゾンの熱帯雨林の音です

  • In fact, temperate and tropical rainforests

    実は 温帯や熱帯の雨林は

  • each produce a vibrant animal orchestra,

    それぞれが生命に満ちた 動物たちの協奏曲を奏でています

  • that instantaneous and organized expression

    それは昆虫や は虫類  両生類や鳥類 ほ乳類などが生み出す

  • of insects, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals.

    即興のハーモニーです

  • And every soundscape that springs from a wild habitat

    自然界からわき上がる すべてのサウンドスケープは

  • generates its own unique signature,

    それぞれ固有の特徴を持っています

  • one that contains incredible amounts of information,

    途方もない量の情報を含んでいます

  • and it's some of that information I want to share with you today.

    そのいくつかを 今日 皆さんと楽しみたいと思います

  • The soundscape is made up of three basic sources.

    サウンドスケープは3つの要素から 成り立っています

  • The first is the geophony,

    最初は大地の音「ジオフォニー」です

  • or the nonbiological sounds that occur

    これはあらゆる生息域で聞くことのできる

  • in any given habitat,

    生物起源ではない音のことです

  • like wind in the trees, water in a stream,

    たとえば梢の風の音 小川のせせらぎ

  • waves at the ocean shore, movement of the Earth.

    海辺の波の音 地球の動きなどです

  • The second of these is the biophony.

    二番目は生物起源の音「バイオフォニー」です

  • The biophony is all of the sound

    バイオフォニーは特定の生息地で

  • that's generated by organisms in a given habitat

    生物が 時と場所に応じて

  • at one time and in one place.

    作り出す音です

  • And the third is all of the sound that we humans generate

    第三の音は私たち人間が作り出す音で

  • that's called anthrophony.

    「アンソロフォニー」と呼ばれます

  • Some of it is controlled, like music or theater,

    芝居や音楽のように制御された音もありますが

  • but most of it is chaotic and incoherent,

    大部分は混沌としていて秩序がなく

  • which some of us refer to as noise.

    雑音と呼ばれるものです

  • There was a time when I considered wild soundscapes

    かつて私は野生のサウンドスケープは

  • to be a worthless artifact.

    値打ちのないものだと思っていました

  • They were just there, but they had no significance.

    ただ単にそこにあって何の意義もないものだと

  • Well, I was wrong. What I learned from these encounters

    私は間違っていました 度重なる体験から学んだのは

  • was that careful listening gives us incredibly valuable tools

    注意深く耳を澄ますと とても重要なことがわかるということです

  • by which to evaluate the health of a habitat

    そこに棲むすべての生物が出す音で

  • across the entire spectrum of life.

    生息地の健康状態を 評価することができるのです

  • When I began recording in the late '60s,

    60年代の終わりに録音を開始した頃は

  • the typical methods of recording were limited

    録音の手法が限られていて

  • to the fragmented capture of individual species

    個々の種を断片的に 収録するだけでした

  • like birds mostly, in the beginning,

    最初は主に鳥類

  • but later animals like mammals and amphibians.

    やがてほ乳類や両生類などが 発する音を録音しました

  • To me, this was a little like trying to understand

    これは ベートーベンの

  • the magnificence of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony

    交響曲第5番の壮大さを

  • by abstracting the sound of a single violin player

    オーケストラ全体ではなく バイオリン奏者1人を抜き出して

  • out of the context of the orchestra

    その音色だけを聴くことで

  • and hearing just that one part.

    理解しようというようなものでした

  • Fortunately, more and more institutions

    幸いにも 私が同僚と サウンドスケープ生態学に導入した

  • are implementing the more holistic models

    よりホリスティックなモデルは

  • that I and a few of my colleagues have introduced

    段々と多くの研究所に

  • to the field of soundscape ecology.

    採用されるようになりました

  • When I began recording over four decades ago,

    40年前に録音を開始した当時は

  • I could record for 10 hours

    10時間録音すれば

  • and capture one hour of usable material,

    使えるデータが1時間分は ありました

  • good enough for an album or a film soundtrack

    レコードや映画のサウンドトラック

  • or a museum installation.

    博物館で使えるほど 質のよいものです

  • Now, because of global warming,

    でも今は地球温暖化と

  • resource extraction,

    資源の採掘

  • and human noise, among many other factors,

    人工音や他の様々な要因のために

  • it can take up to 1,000 hours or more

    使用に耐える1時間の音を集めるには

  • to capture the same thing.

    1,000時間はかかります

  • Fully 50 percent of my archive

    アーカイブのコレクションの半分は

  • comes from habitats so radically altered

    その後環境があまりにも変化したため

  • that they're either altogether silent

    生物の音が全くしなくなったか

  • or can no longer be heard in any of their original form.

    録音当時の音がしなくなった場所で 収録されたものです

  • The usual methods of evaluating a habitat

    通常 生息地を評価するには

  • have been done by visually counting the numbers of species

    その場の生物の種の数と

  • and the numbers of individuals within each species in a given area.

    それぞれの種に属する個体数を 目で見て数えます

  • However, by comparing data that ties together

    しかし 聞こえてくる音の 密度と多様性を組み合わせ

  • both density and diversity from what we hear,

    そのデータを比較することで

  • I'm able to arrive at much more precise fitness outcomes.

    より正確に その生息地の健康さを 測ることができます

  • And I want to show you some examples

    いくつか例をお見せしましょう

  • that typify the possibilities unlocked

    音の世界に飛び込むことで開ける

  • by diving into this universe.

    可能性が よくわかるでしょう

  • This is Lincoln Meadow.

    ここはリンカーンメドウです

  • Lincoln Meadow's a three-and-a-half-hour drive

    サンフランシスコから

  • east of San Francisco in the Sierra Nevada Mountains,

    シエラネバダ山脈に向かって 車で3時間半のところにあります

  • at about 2,000 meters altitude,

    標高は約2,000メートル

  • and I've been recording there for many years.

    ここで長年採録してきました

  • In 1988, a logging company convinced local residents

    1998年に森林伐採業者が

  • that there would be absolutely no environmental impact

    「選択伐採」という新しい方法は

  • from a new method they were trying

    環境への影響は絶対にないと

  • called "selective logging,"

    地元住民を説得しました

  • taking out a tree here and there

    すべての木を伐採するのではなく

  • rather than clear-cutting a whole area.

    選択して伐採する方法です

  • With permission granted to record

    伐採の前後で

  • both before and after the operation,

    音を収録する許可を得て

  • I set up my gear and captured a large number of dawn choruses

    装置を持ち込み 夜明けの合唱を 何度も録音しました

  • to very strict protocol and calibrated recordings,

    信頼できる基準値が必要だったので

  • because I wanted a really good baseline.

    厳密に手順を守り数値を記録しました

  • This is an example of a spectrogram.

    これがそのスペクトログラムです

  • A spectrogram is a graphic illustration of sound

    スペクトログラムは所定の 時間内の音を画像化したもので

  • with time from left to right across the page --

    画面の左から右に広がります

  • 15 seconds in this case is represented

    -- ここでは15秒間が表示されています --

  • and frequency from the bottom of the page to the top,

    周波数が低いものは下に 高いものは上に来ます

  • lowest to highest.

    周波数が低いものは下に 高いものは上に来ます

  • And you can see that the signature of a stream

    ご覧の通り小川のせせらぎの 特徴的な波形が

  • is represented here in the bottom third or half of the page,

    画面の下三分の一から二分の一に 表示されています

  • while birds that were once in that meadow

    一方で かつてメドウにいた鳥たちの鳴き声は

  • are represented in the signature across the top.

    画面の上部に表示されています とてもたくさんの鳥がいました

  • There were a lot of them.

    画面の上部に表示されています とてもたくさんの鳥がいました

  • And here's Lincoln Meadow before selective logging.

    これが選択伐採前のリンカーンメドウです

  • (Nature sounds)

    (野鳥の鳴き声)

  • Well, a year later I returned,

    一年後同じ場所に戻り

  • and using the same protocols

    同じ手順を踏んで

  • and recording under the same conditions,

    同じ条件の下で

  • I recorded a number of examples

    同じ夜明けの合唱を

  • of the same dawn choruses,

    何度も録音しました

  • and now this is what we've got.

    これがその結果です

  • This is after selective logging.

    これが選抜伐採の後です

  • You can see that the stream is still represented

    小川のせせらぎはやはり下から

  • in the bottom third of the page,

    三分の一のあたりに存在しますが

  • but notice what's missing in the top two thirds.

    上部の三分の二が実に寂しいです

  • (Nature sounds)

    (野鳥の鳴き声)

  • Coming up is the sound of a woodpecker.

    聞こえてくるのはキツツキの音です

  • Well, I've returned to Lincoln Meadow 15 times

    リンカーンメドウは この25年で

  • in the last 25 years,

    15回訪れましたが

  • and I can tell you that the biophony,

    確実に言えるのは バイオフォニーは

  • the density and diversity of that biophony,

    かつてのバイオフォニーの密度と多様性は

  • has not yet returned to anything like it was

    伐採の後は

  • before the operation.

    復活していないということです

  • But here's a picture of Lincoln Meadow taken after,

    これは伐採後のリンカーンメドウの写真です

  • and you can see that from the perspective of the camera

    カメラの視点からあるいは

  • or the human eye,

    人の目から見ると

  • hardly a stick or a tree appears to be out of place,

    ほとんど何も変わっていないように見えます

  • which would confirm the logging company's contention

    環境への影響は全くないという

  • that there's nothing of environmental impact.

    伐採会社の言い分が通るわけです

  • However, our ears tell us a very different story.

    しかしながら 私たちの耳はだまされません

  • Young students are always asking me

    動物たちは何を言っているのかと 子供たちは私に尋ねますが

  • what these animals are saying,

    動物たちは何を言っているのかと 子供たちは私に尋ねますが

  • and really I've got no idea.

    私にはわかりません

  • But I can tell you that they do express themselves.

    でも動物たちは 何らかのメッセージを発しています

  • Whether or not we understand it is a different story.

    私たちがそれを理解できるかどうかは 別の話です

  • I was walking along the shore in Alaska,

    アラスカの海岸を歩いていて

  • and I came across this tide pool

    潮だまりを見つけました

  • filled with a colony of sea anemones,

    そこにはイソギンチャクがびっしり

  • these wonderful eating machines,

    実にきれいな食肉動物で

  • relatives of coral and jellyfish.

    珊瑚やクラゲの親戚です

  • And curious to see if any of them made any noise,

    イソギンチャクは音を出すのか 知りたくて

  • I dropped a hydrophone,

    ゴムで覆われた

  • an underwater microphone covered in rubber,

    水中マイクロホンを

  • down the mouth part,

    口の部分に入れると

  • and immediately the critter began

    この生物は即座に

  • to absorb the microphone into its belly,

    マイクを腹の中に収めようとし

  • and the tentacles were searching out of the surface

    触手をマイクの表面に這わせて

  • for something of nutritional value.

    栄養分を探っていました

  • The static-like sounds that are very low,

    ラジオの雑音のような音です

  • that you're going to hear right now.

    皆さんにもお聞かせしましょう

  • (Static sounds)

    (ラジオの雑音のような音)

  • Yeah, but watch. When it didn't find anything to eat --

    どうです しかし 食物ではないとわかると

  • (Honking sound)

    (クラクションのような音)

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I think that's an expression that can be understood

    どのような言語でも この表現は

  • in any language.

    通じるでしょうね

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • At the end of its breeding cycle,

    繁殖期の最後に

  • the Great Basin Spadefoot toad

    グレートベースンスキアシガエルは

  • digs itself down about a meter under

    アメリカ西部の固い砂漠の土に

  • the hard-panned desert soil of the American West,

    約1メートルの穴を掘り

  • where it can stay for many seasons

    地上で暮らしやすい環境が訪れるまで

  • until conditions are just right for it to emerge again.

    穴の中でいくつもの季節を過ごします

  • And when there's enough moisture in the soil

    春になり 土中の水分量が高まると

  • in the spring, frogs will dig themselves to the surface

    カエルたちは地表に現れて

  • and gather around these large, vernal pools

    春の水を湛えた 大きな池に

  • in great numbers.

    大挙して集まります

  • And they vocalize in a chorus

    そして声を合わせて鳴きます

  • that's absolutely in sync with one another.

    見事に調和した合唱です

  • And they do that for two reasons.

    これには2つ理由があります

  • The first is competitive, because they're looking for mates,

    一つは競争です 交尾する相手を求めているのです

  • and the second is cooperative,

    二つ目は協力です

  • because if they're all vocalizing in sync together,

    皆で声を合わせれば

  • it makes it really difficult for predators like coyotes,

    コヨーテやキツネやフクロウのような 捕食動物が

  • foxes and owls to single out any individual for a meal.

    個体を見つけ捕らえることが 非常に難しくなります

  • This is a spectrogram of what the frog chorusing looks like

    これは彼らの合唱のスペクトログラムです

  • when it's in a very healthy pattern.

    とても健康的なパターンを示しています

  • (Frogs croaking)

    (カエルの鳴き声)

  • Mono Lake is just to the east of Yosemite National Park

    モノ湖はカリフォルニア州にあり ヨセミテ国立公園の

  • in California,

    少し東に位置します

  • and it's a favorite habitat of these toads,

    このカエルたちが好む生息地です

  • and it's also favored by U.S. Navy jet pilots,

    ここはまた 米国海軍パイロット お気に入りの訓練場でもあり

  • who train in their fighters flying them at speeds

    ジェット戦闘機が訓練のために

  • exceeding 1,100 kilometers an hour

    時速1,100キロを超える速度で

  • and altitudes only a couple hundred meters

    地上数百メートルの高度で

  • above ground level of the Mono Basin,

    モノ・ベイスンの上を飛行します

  • very fast, very low, and so loud

    超高速 超低空 そしてすさまじい騒音なので

  • that the anthrophony, the human noise,

    人の作り出した音 アンソロフォニーが

  • even though it's six and a half kilometers

    先ほどのカエルの池から

  • from the frog pond you just heard a second ago,

    6.5キロ離れているとはいえ

  • it masked the sound of the chorusing toads.

    カエルの合唱をかき消してしまいます

  • You can see in this spectrogram that all of the energy

    次のスペクトログラムでわかるように

  • that was once in the first spectrogram is gone

    最初のスペクトログラムで見た

  • from the top end of the spectrogram,

    高い周波数の声の力が失せて

  • and that there's breaks in the chorusing at two and a half,

    2.5秒 4.5秒

  • four and a half, and six and a half seconds,

    6.5秒の場所に 合唱の休止が見えます

  • and then the sound of the jet, the signature,

    ジェット機の音がはっきりと

  • is in yellow at the very bottom of the page.

    画面の下に黄色く見えます

  • (Frogs croaking)

    (カエルの鳴き声)

  • Now at the end of that flyby,

    この低空飛行の後

  • it took the frogs fully 45 minutes

    カエルたちが 再び声を唱和させるのに

  • to regain their chorusing synchronicity,

    45分かかりました

  • during which time, and under a full moon,

    この間 満月の下で

  • we watched as two coyotes and a great horned owl

    2頭のコヨーテと アメリカワシミミズクが

  • came in to pick off a few of their numbers.

    数匹のカエルを餌食にするのを 目撃しました

  • The good news is that, with a little bit of habitat restoration

    良い知らせもあります 生息地を回復させ

  • and fewer flights, the frog populations,

    飛行回数を減らしたところ

  • once diminishing during the 1980s and early '90s,

    1980年代から90年代にかけて 減少していたカエルが

  • have pretty much returned to normal.

    以前の数ほどに回復したのです

  • I want to end with a story told by a beaver.

    最後にビーバーの話をしましょう

  • It's a very sad story,

    とても悲しい話ですが

  • but it really illustrates how animals

    動物が時には感情を示すことが あるのだということを

  • can sometimes show emotion,

    語ってくれます

  • a very controversial subject among some older biologists.

    古参の生物学者には 異論がある話題でしょうね

  • A colleague of mine was recording in the American Midwest

    私の同僚がアメリカ中西部で 音を収録していました

  • around this pond that had been formed

    最後の氷河期が終わる頃

  • maybe 16,000 years ago at the end of the last ice age.

    おそらく1万6千年ほど前に できた湖のほとりにいました

  • It was also formed in part by a beaver dam

    湖の一端にはビーバーが作った ダムがあり

  • at one end that held that whole ecosystem together

    それが生態系の微妙なバランスを

  • in a very delicate balance.

    保っていました

  • And one afternoon, while he was recording,

    ある日の午後 彼が録音していると

  • there suddenly appeared from out of nowhere

    どこからともなく突然

  • a couple of game wardens,

    数人の狩猟監視人が現れました

  • who for no apparent reason,

    彼らははっきりとした理由もなく

  • walked over to the beaver dam,

    ビーバーダムに近づき

  • dropped a stick of dynamite down it, blowing it up,

    ダイナマイトを仕掛け ダムを爆破したのです

  • killing the female and her young babies.

    母親のビーバーと子どもたちが死にました

  • Horrified, my colleagues remained behind

    同僚は あまりのことに震え上がりましたが

  • to gather his thoughts

    その場に残り 気を取り直して

  • and to record whatever he could the rest of the afternoon,

    午後の録音を続けました

  • and that evening, he captured a remarkable event:

    その夕刻 彼は驚くべきことを 記録したのです

  • the lone surviving male beaver swimming in slow circles

    唯一生き残った雄のビーバーが 亡くなった連れ合いと子どもたちを悼んで

  • crying out inconsolably for its lost mate and offspring.

    悲しげに鳴きながら ゆっくりと円を描いて泳いでいたのです

  • This is probably the saddest sound

    それは人間を含めた あらゆる生き物が発する音の中で

  • I've ever heard coming from any organism,

    私が今までに聞いた

  • human or other.

    もっとも悲しい音でした

  • (Beaver crying)

    (ビーバーの鳴き声)

  • Yeah. Well.

    いかがでしょうか

  • There are many facets to soundscapes,

    サウンドスケープには いろいろな側面があります

  • among them the ways in which animals taught us to dance and sing,

    中には動物が私たちに 歌や踊りを教えてくれるものもあります

  • which I'll save for another time.

    それはまた別の機会にお聞かせしましょう

  • But you have heard how biophonies

    ここまでの話で バイオフォニーが

  • help clarify our understanding of the natural world.

    自然界への理解を 助けてくれることがおわかりでしょう

  • You've heard the impact of resource extraction,

    地下資源採掘の影響についても話しましたし

  • human noise and habitat destruction.

    人工音と生息地の破壊もお話ししました

  • And where environmental sciences have typically

    環境科学者たちは見えるものから

  • tried to understand the world from what we see,

    世界を理解しようとしますが

  • a much fuller understanding can be got from what we hear.

    聞こえるものからの方が はるかに世界をよく理解できるのです

  • Biophonies and geophonies are the signature voices

    バイオフォニーやジオフォニーは自然界のー

  • of the natural</