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  • CHRIS: Hi, everyone.

  • Thanks for coming.

  • My name's Chris [? Wallen. ?] I'm an engineer here at Google

  • on the Maps team.

  • And I'm hosting today Walter Voit and Srishti Goel

  • from Adaptive 3D Technologies, and they're

  • going to give a talk about what they

  • call their extreme 3D printing.

  • So without further ado, I present Walter Voit.

  • WALTER VOIT: Thanks, Chris.

  • It's a pleasure to be back here at Google.

  • As Chris mentioned, I'm Walter Voit.

  • We founded Adaptive 3D about two years ago

  • as a spin-out from a company that I founded back

  • in grad school called Syzygy Memory Plastics.

  • In my spare time, I'm a professor at UT Dallas

  • and run a research lab that focuses in polymer chemistry,

  • in flexible electronics, in radiation processing

  • and materials, and looking at fundamental interfaces

  • of materials.

  • And in this quest to make better, stretchier,

  • lighter, stronger materials, we've

  • come up with some really neat ways

  • to be able to build them layer by layer

  • and make stronger, tougher, 3D printed parts.

  • Let's get right into it.

  • So Adaptive started in 2014.

  • Up here is our management team.

  • I'm the president for now until we

  • find sort of a seasoned management

  • team, for which we're looking.

  • Srishti, who's here, just joined the team a little while ago.

  • She got her Material Science degree at Columbia,

  • and is leading a lot of interactions with the companies

  • that we work with.

  • Dr. Lund is an organic chemist by training

  • who specializes in a lot of our new synthetic monomers.

  • Dan Patterson is our first investor.

  • He's a seasoned private equity guy back in Dallas.

  • He's bought and sold more than 30 companies since 1993

  • and does a lot in the middle market manufacturing

  • and business logistics, and I think

  • has really come in and given us a lot of experience.

  • He was a Harvard MBA guy from the late '70s.

  • And finally, Brent Duncan.

  • He was the co-founder with me of Syzygy Memory Plastics.

  • He and I were grad school buddies from Georgia Tech.

  • He was in the MBA program and I was in the PhD Program.

  • Brent also has a PhD in Material Science and Engineering

  • from Duke University, and spent some time with a nicotine

  • s startup company in the Research Triangle.

  • And then has been working with a lot of technology

  • transfer back in Dallas for the better part of the last half

  • decade.

  • So what our mission and what our job at Adaptive is,

  • is to really provide services to large companies.

  • We work primarily with large Fortune 500 companies.

  • Halliburton is our first big, big customer.

  • We've also engage a number of others.

  • And we're trying to build parts that can't be made today

  • by conventional means.

  • So let me get into what that market opportunity is.

  • In the past almost 25 years, 3D printing-- you guys

  • have probably heard it as a buzz word, as a tech word--

  • and it means a lot of different things

  • to a lot of different people.

  • You can 3D print metals, ceramics, plastics,

  • so we're a niche.

  • We're just focused on plastics, and within the area

  • of plastics, we've focused on soft, rubber-like materials,

  • and viscoelastic materials, materials

  • that have extreme toughness.

  • 3D printing has had a 25% compounding annual growth rate

  • over the last 25 years or so, and it's

  • projected to serve as a critical part of the $16 trillion

  • manufacturing economy by 2030.

  • And you have to ask why that is.

  • Well, a lot of the big companies in our space,

  • in the polymer space, 3D Systems and Stratasys

  • are two of the large players.

  • And I think a lot of market hype sort of caught

  • up and even surpassed the expec--

  • or surpassed the reality of where 3D printing was.

  • If you look at a lot of these stock prices,

  • in 2014 there were some pretty big peaks,

  • and things haven't been so rosy on the market

  • side for 3D printers.

  • And the reason is because companies

  • have been unable to 3D print high value industrial parts.

  • A lot of 3D printers and 3D printing companies,

  • we like to call the Kickstarter babies,

  • have come out with the shock and awe.

  • The hey, let's print something really quickly, or let's print

  • some really complex widgets.

  • But a lot of the back end market reporting

  • from Wohlers and from other sources

  • has identified this giant additive manufacturing market

  • as the real value add.

  • It's the idea that you can print materials.

  • That if you print this first layer, the second layer,

  • the third layer, the fourth layer,

  • they need to be as strong in this x-direction

  • or this y-direction as they are in this z-direction.

  • And a lot of parts suffer from this problem called anisotropy,

  • not the same in all directions.

  • And so with our background in understanding polymers

  • and polymer physics, we've focused

  • on printing isotropically tough parts,

  • and have found really neat ways to chemically

  • cross-link plastics in this direction,

  • as well as in this direction to make them strong and tough.

  • And in a little bit I'll show some

  • of the materials properties, some of the stress strain

  • curves.

  • I don't get too nerdy and techie,

  • but that's sort of the limiting problem that's

  • kept these kinds of materials from being

  • a solution to industrial problems.

  • Today, a lot of 3D printed parts are used to print molds,

  • to print jigs, and then you'll do conventional manufacturing

  • in those 3D printed molds.

  • But it's difficult to print a rubber, to print a plastic,

  • and have that go into an automobile,

  • have that go into an oil well, have

  • that go into a tennis shoe, have that go into a spaceship.

  • And so, what we're looking at doing

  • is solving that problem for a subset of materials.

  • So today less than 29% of 3D printed parts

  • are used for functional parts, and the market

  • is just a fraction of what it could become.

  • So what have we done over at Adaptive

  • to print these tough, high quality rubbers and plastics?

  • Well, we've focused on very scalable solutions.

  • So while we are synthetic, organic chemists at root,

  • we've tried to limit the design and manufacture of brand

  • new monomers.

  • But we use things that we can source from large chemical

  • manufacturers that can be scaled to meet a large market.

  • We've developed a very nice patent portfolio.

  • A lot of the research has been translated from research

  • at the University of Texas at Dallas.

  • But we've been able to build materials

  • with incredible strain capacity, things

  • that can stretch five times their original size

  • and then snap back into shape.

  • Or things today that have a toughness of 16 megajoules

  • per meter cubed, and some experimental materials that

  • are far greater than that.

  • And I'll get more into those details in a little bit.

  • We also tune a lot of the important properties

  • for 3D printed parts.

  • We've developed a new kind of 3D printer to make our polymers,

  • following a process called SLA or stereo lithography.

  • But we've used Texas Instruments DLP projectors.

  • You might have seen the ads, it's

  • the little mirrors, little girls with elephants running around.

  • Maybe you've got home theater projectors.

  • I don't know if this is a DLP projector, but it probably is.

  • But what we can do is we can focus light.

  • These mirrors will actuate at about 6,000 Hz,

  • and so we can turn light on and off very controllably, very

  • selectively, and we designed resins

  • that can be selectively photopolymerized.

  • And we can very rapidly print layer after layer,

  • and print a whole layer at once at the resolution

  • of SLA technology.

  • So most of these mirrors are spaced out

  • about 16 microns apart in one of the machines

  • by the time you have your throw angle down onto a part.

  • It's a little larger than that, so in x and y

  • we've got feature sizes in the 20 to 75 micron range.

  • And then in the z-axis we can make

  • that as finely resolute as we'd like, or as large as we'd like.

  • And that dictates a lot of the print speed of our parts.

  • We've come up with some really interesting