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  • 10. Tropical Fruit-Pants

  • In 1872, one misplaced comma cost the U.S. Government $2 million. To put that in perspective,

  • today that comma would be worth over $50 million.

  • The tiny error was made in the US Tariff Act, instead of making tropicalfruit-plants

  • [that’s fruit hyphen plants, meaning plants that bear fruit] exempt from tariffs, the

  • act used the wordingfruit, plants’ [that’s fruit comma plants]. That rogue comma mean

  • all tropical fruit and plants were free from charge.

  • The government did eventually correct the typo, but until after two years of lost revenue.

  • Source: Business Insider, International Business Times

  • 09. Japanese Sock Exchange

  • The Japanese Mizuho [mitz-uh-ho] Securities Co, a division of the second largest bank

  • in Japan, lost millions in a typo related error in 2005.

  • While trying to sell shares of a recruiting agency on the Japanese Stock Exchange, the

  • bank accidentally listed 610,000 shares as costing 1 yen each, rather than each share

  • costing 610,000 yen. No one seemed to notice the fact that 610,000 shares was actually

  • 41 times the number available, either.

  • In less than a day, the company lost a quarter of a billion dollars - equivalent to the entire

  • profit it had made that year.

  • The mistake was attributed tofat-fingersyndrome; a term in the stock market for a

  • huge accidental blunder.

  • Source: CBS News, Financial Times

  • 08. Airline Rickets

  • In 2006 Alitalia Airlines accidentally listed business-class flights from Toronto to Cyprus

  • at $39, instead of $3,900. Two thousand quick-thinking travelers took advantage of the mistake, booking

  • tickets as fast as they could.

  • When the airline tried to cancel the tickets, they suffered a massive backlash from their

  • customers. Worried about their reputation Alitalia decided to cut its losses and allow

  • the budget ticket holders to fly; a move which improved public relations, but cost the company

  • somewhere in the region of $7.2 million.

  • Source: Daily Mirror, CBC, National Post

  • 07. The Brutish Government

  • The British Government accidentally listed Taylor & Sons Ltd., rather than Taylor & Son

  • Ltd. as a failing business approaching liquidation.

  • This extra ‘S’ in the name of the report caused a confusion between the failing company

  • and a respected engineering firm, which saw it’s clients back out of deals, its suppliers

  • cancel contracts and creditors withdrawing their agreement.

  • Two months after the typo report the 134-year-old family business was bankrupt, with 250 people

  • losing their jobs. Seen as a direct consequence of the British Government’s mistake Taylor

  • & Sons were awarded nearly $14 million in compensation in 2015.

  • Source: Daily Mail, Metro

  • 06. Buying and Soiling

  • Between 1993 and 1994, stockbroker Juan Pablo Davila lost $206 million on the stock market

  • because of a simple typo.

  • The trader accidentally entered the shares he wanted to sell into the buy column on his

  • computer and lost $30 million. After realizing his costly mistake, Davila went on a buying

  • and selling spree, making 5,000 transactions with 23 brokers in less than 6 months - risking

  • up to $1.8 billion but finally losing a total of $206 million.

  • He eventually served 3 years in prison for his dubious financial prowess.

  • Source: LA Times, NY Times, ISLA 1997

  • 05. Everyone’s A Weiner

  • In 2007, a car dealership thought it would be a great idea to drum up some customers

  • by sending out lottery tickets to locals. The idea was to send out 50,000 tickets with

  • just one winner of a $1,000.

  • Unfortunately, the marketing company responsible for making the tickets made a huge mistake.

  • They printed all 50,000 tickets as grand prize winners - essentially giving away $50 million.

  • Rather than pay out the fortune, the dealership apologized and offered $5 Wal-Mart gift cards.

  • Source: UPI, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal

  • 04. Lockheed Martini

  • When Lockheed Martin agreed to produce a military transport aircraft for an unnamed air force,

  • thought to be UK, Italy or Australia, they signed a very specific contract.

  • As the deal would require several years of manufacturing, the agreement stated that the

  • cost the planes would increase alongside inflation.

  • Unfortunately the formula that worked out the cost of the aircraft had a typo in it;

  • a comma that was one decimal place in the wrong direction. This typo would cause Lockheed

  • Martin to lose $70 million, as they were locked into the contract, and the customer, whoever

  • it was, wouldn’t agree to adjust the error.

  • Source: The Indian Express, CNN

  • 03. Googol

  • Typosquatting is a controversial practice where people register slightly misspelled

  • versions of popular websites to generate hits and revenue, and, according to a Harvard study

  • in 2010, it can be very lucrative.

  • Researchers found that whenever someone types in the wrong address to go to a website, which

  • is about 0.7% of the time, they are normally redirected to a site covered in advertisements.

  • Going totypowebsites happens over 70 million times a day, costing the correctly

  • spelled domain tons of cash. In fact, as Google supply more than half the ads on the typo

  • sites, its estimated the search giant earns a whopping $500 million from the practice.

  • Source: New Scientist, Benjamin Edelman - Harvard University, The Register

  • 02. Yellow Mages

  • In 1988 a Californian travel agency posted an advert in the Yellow Pages forExotic

  • travel’, but unfortunately a typo led to it advertisingerotic travelinstead.

  • The agency’s reputation was destroyed, losing 80% of its existing customers and gaining

  • next to no new business because of the advertisement - aside from prank calls and heavy breathing

  • perverts.

  • Yellow Pages allegedly refused to issue a correction so the travel agency sued, and

  • won $18 million on the grounds of gross negligence.

  • Source: AP Newswire, The Daily Mirror

  • 01. NASA Rackets

  • On July 22, 1962 the Mariner 1 space probe exploded shortly after liftoff, in one of

  • the most expensive typo related incidents in history.

  • NASA investigators concluded that the omission of a single hyphen in the guidance software

  • had led to a series of false course correction signals. The rocket was then deliberately

  • detonated to prevent the rocket crashing down in a populated area.

  • Political pressure to get the rocket in space was blamed for the rushed preparations; leading

  • to the typo’s presence. The rocket was worth between $80 and $150 million.

  • Source: Wired, NASA, Reliability in Scientific Research by IR Walker

10. Tropical Fruit-Pants

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数百万ドルの費用がかかる10のタイプミス (10 Typos That Cost Millions Of Dollars)

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    richardwang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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