Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Translator: Joseph Geni Reviewer: Morton Bast

    想像してみて下さい

  • I want you to imagine this for a moment.

    ラウルとラジブという二人の男性がいます

  • Two men, Rahul and Rajiv,

    同じ地域に住んでいて

  • living in the same neighborhood,

    学歴も同じで 同じような職業に就いています

  • from the same educational background, similar occupation,

    その二人が近所の救急病棟にやってきて

  • and they both turn up at their local accident emergency

    鋭い胸痛を訴えます

  • complaining of acute chest pain.

    ラウルは心臓疾患の処置を受けられますが

  • Rahul is offered a cardiac procedure,

    ラジブは帰宅するよう言われます

  • but Rajiv is sent home.

    殆ど同じような境遇の二人なのに

  • What might explain the difference in the experience

    体験に差があるのはなぜでしょうか?

  • of these two nearly identical men?

    それはラジブが精神疾患を患っているからです

  • Rajiv suffers from a mental illness.

    受けられる医療の質の差は

  • The difference in the quality of medical care

    精神疾患で苦しんでいる人々の寿命が

  • received by people with mental illness is one of the reasons

    精神障害者ではない人々よりも

  • why they live shorter lives

    短い理由のひとつです

  • than people without mental illness.

    しっかり設備の整った世界の先進国でさえ

  • Even in the best-resourced countries in the world,

    この寿命の差は20年にも及ぶ場合があります

  • this life expectancy gap is as much as 20 years.

    そして世界の発展途上国では

  • In the developing countries of the world, this gap

    この差はさらに広がります

  • is even larger.

    もちろん精神疾患が もっと直接的に死につながることもあります

  • But of course, mental illnesses can kill in more direct ways

    最も分かりやすいのは自殺ですね

  • as well. The most obvious example is suicide.

    私が驚いたように ここにいる方々も驚くと思うのですが

  • It might surprise some of you here, as it did me,

    亡くなった若者の死因で

  • when I discovered that suicide is at the top of the list

    最も多いのが自殺です

  • of the leading causes of death in young people

    世界中のどこの国でも第一位です

  • in all countries in the world,

    これは世界で最も貧しい国々も含まれます

  • including the poorest countries of the world.

    健康状態が寿命に及ぼす影響だけでなく

  • But beyond the impact of a health condition

    私たちは彼らが生きる生活の質にも

  • on life expectancy, we're also concerned

    関心を持っています

  • about the quality of life lived.

    さて 健康状態が寿命と生活の質

  • Now, in order for us to examine the overall impact

    その両方に及ぼした 全体的な影響を分析するには

  • of a health condition both on life expectancy

    DALYという測定基準を使う必要があります

  • as well as on the quality of life lived, we need to use

    DALYとは

  • a metric called the DALY,

    障害調整生命年の略です

  • which stands for a Disability-Adjusted Life Year.

    それを見てみると 世界的な視野から精神疾患について

  • Now when we do that, we discover some startling things

    驚くべきことを発見することができます

  • about mental illness from a global perspective.

    例えば 様々な精神疾患は世界中で

  • We discover that, for example, mental illnesses are

    障害を引き起こす主要原因だということです

  • amongst the leading causes of disability around the world.

    例えば 子供の障害を引き起こす要因で

  • Depression, for example, is the third-leading cause

    うつ病は下痢と肺炎と並んで

  • of disability, alongside conditions such as

    第三位となっています

  • diarrhea and pneumonia in children.

    精神疾患を一括りにすると

  • When you put all the mental illnesses together,

    世界の疾病負担の

  • they account for roughly 15 percent

    およそ15パーセントにも及びます

  • of the total global burden of disease.

    確かに精神障害は 人々の生活に大きな打撃を与えますが

  • Indeed, mental illnesses are also very damaging

    その疾病負担だけでなく

  • to people's lives, but beyond just the burden of disease,

    絶対数で考えてみたいと思います

  • let us consider the absolute numbers.

    世界保健機関は地球の人口の

  • The World Health Organization estimates

    およそ 4億から5億人が

  • that there are nearly four to five hundred million people

    何らかの精神疾患で

  • living on our tiny planet

    苦しんでいると推定しています

  • who are affected by a mental illness.

    人数を聞いて

  • Now some of you here

    驚いた人もいるようですが

  • look a bit astonished by that number,

    精神疾患は非常に多様なのです

  • but consider for a moment the incredible diversity

    幼少期の自閉症や知的障害

  • of mental illnesses, from autism and intellectual disability

    成人のうつ病や不安神経症から

  • in childhood, through to depression and anxiety,

    薬物乱用や精神病

  • substance misuse and psychosis in adulthood,

    そして高齢者の認知症まで

  • all the way through to dementia in old age,

    ここにいる誰もが

  • and I'm pretty sure that each and every one us

    そのような精神疾患を患い

  • present here today can think of at least one person,

    苦しんでいる人を

  • at least one person, who's affected by mental illness

    一人は知っているんじゃないでしょうか

  • in our most intimate social networks.

    頷いていますね

  • I see some nodding heads there.

    しかしこの圧倒的な数字よりも

  • But beyond the staggering numbers,

    世界的な保健医療の観点から見て重要で

  • what's truly important from a global health point of view,

    世界的な保健医療の観点から見て 非常に懸念されることは

  • what's truly worrying from a global health point of view,

    このように苦しんでいる人々の大半が

  • is that the vast majority of these affected individuals

    受ければ人生を変えられるとわかっている治療を

  • do not receive the care

    受けられないと言うことです

  • that we know can transform their lives, and remember,

    薬剤や心理学的介入 社会的介入など

  • we do have robust evidence that a range of interventions,

    様々な介入をすることで

  • medicines, psychological interventions,

    大きな効果が得られるという確たる証拠があります

  • and social interventions, can make a vast difference.

    しかしヨーロッパのように医療資源が整った諸国でさえも

  • And yet, even in the best-resourced countries,

    苦しんでいる人々のおよそ50パーセントが

  • for example here in Europe, roughly 50 percent

    治療を受けられていません

  • of affected people don't receive these interventions.

    私が働いているような国々では

  • In the sorts of countries I work in,

    いわゆる医療の需給ギャップは

  • that so-called treatment gap

    なんと 90パーセントにものぼろうとしています

  • approaches an astonishing 90 percent.

    もし精神障害者と話す機会があれば

  • It isn't surprising, then, that if you should speak

    彼らが一生の間抱えてきた

  • to anyone affected by a mental illness,

    隠れた苦しみと

  • the chances are that you will hear stories

    恥と差別の話を

  • of hidden suffering, shame and discrimination

    耳にする可能性が高いでしょう

  • in nearly every sector of their lives.

    しかし なによりも悲痛なのは

  • But perhaps most heartbreaking of all

    最も基本的な人権の侵害が

  • are the stories of the abuse

    毎日起きているということでしょう

  • of even the most basic human rights,

    例えばこの写真の少女が体験しているような

  • such as the young woman shown in this image here

    人権侵害は常に起きているのです

  • that are played out every day,

    残念なことに それは精神障害者のケアをするために造られた

  • sadly, even in the very institutions that were built to care

    精神病院でも起きているのです

  • for people with mental illnesses, the mental hospitals.

    このような悲惨な実態に突き動かされて

  • It's this injustice that has really driven my mission

    精神障害を患った人々の生活を変えるために

  • to try to do a little bit to transform the lives

    少しでも挑戦することが私のミッションとなりました

  • of people affected by mental illness, and a particularly

    私が特に注力しているのは

  • critical action that I focused on is to bridge the gulf

    彼らの人生を変えられる知識や有効な治療を

  • between the knowledge we have that can transform lives,

    実社会においていかに活用していくか

  • the knowledge of effective treatments, and how we actually

    そのギャップの橋渡しをすることです

  • use that knowledge in the everyday world.

    そして私が直面した重要な課題は

  • And an especially important challenge that I've had to face

    メンタルヘルス専門家の深刻な人手不足でした

  • is the great shortage of mental health professionals,

    例えば精神科医や心理学者といった専門家が

  • such as psychiatrists and psychologists,

    特に発展途上国では大きく不足していました

  • particularly in the developing world.

    私はインドで医学を学び

  • Now I trained in medicine in India, and after that

    その後専門として精神医学を選択しました

  • I chose psychiatry as my specialty, much to the dismay

    母や家族は優秀な息子の選択に落胆していました

  • of my mother and all my family members who

    脳外科の方が社会的にも

  • kind of thought neurosurgery would be

    立派だと思っていたんでしょうね

  • a more respectable option for their brilliant son.

    それでも私は精神医学の勉強を続け

  • Any case, I went on, I soldiered on with psychiatry,

    イギリスでも最先端の病院で研修を受けました

  • and found myself training in Britain in some of

    非常に恵まれていましたね

  • the best hospitals in this country. I was very privileged.

    私が働いていたチームには とても才能と思いやりがあり

  • I worked in a team of incredibly talented, compassionate,

    そして最も重要なことに 高度な訓練を受けた

  • but most importantly, highly trained, specialized

    メンタルヘルスの専門家が集まっていました

  • mental health professionals.

    訓練を終えた私は

  • Soon after my training, I found myself working

    まずジンバブエ その後インドで働きましたが

  • first in Zimbabwe and then in India, and I was confronted

    まったく新しい現実と直面したのです

  • by an altogether new reality.

    その現実とは メンタルヘルスの専門家が

  • This was a reality of a world in which there were almost no

    殆ど存在しない世界でした

  • mental health professionals at all.

    ジンバブエには十人程度の精神科医しかいませんでした

  • In Zimbabwe, for example, there were just about

    その大半はハラレの街に住み 働いていました

  • a dozen psychiatrists, most of whom lived and worked

    つまり 残りの二人程度で

  • in Harare city, leaving only a couple

    地方に住む900万人のメンタルヘルスのニーズを

  • to address the mental health care needs

    賄わなければなりませんでした

  • of nine million people living in the countryside.

    インドの状況も似たようなものでした

  • In India, I found the situation was not a lot better.

    わかりやすく説明しましょう

  • To give you a perspective, if I had to translate

    インドにもイギリスと同じ割合の精神科医がいるとします

  • the proportion of psychiatrists in the population

    単純計算すると

  • that one might see in Britain to India,

    インドにはおよそ15万人の精神科医がいることになります

  • one might expect roughly 150,000 psychiatrists in India.

    実際にはどうでしょう

  • In reality, take a guess.

    実際の数字はおよそ3000人

  • The actual number is about 3,000,

    15万人の2%程度です

  • about two percent of that number.

    私はすぐに 自分が教わったような

  • It became quickly apparent to me that I couldn't follow

    ヘルスケアのモデルに従うことはできないと気づきました

  • the sorts of mental health care models that I had been trained in,

    専門分野の限られた 高額な

  • one that relied heavily on specialized, expensive

    精神医療の専門家に頼った メンタルヘルスケアは

  • mental health professionals to provide mental health care

    インドやジンバブエのような国では 提供できないのです

  • in countries like India and Zimbabwe.

    そこで私は型にはまらない発想で

  • I had to think out of the box about some other model

    別のケアモデルを考えなければなりませんでした

  • of care.

    その時 私はこれらの本に出会ったのです

  • It was then that I came across these books,

    これらの本の中で 私は世界の医療においての

  • and in these books I discovered the idea of task shifting

    タスク・シフティングという発想に 出会ったのです

  • in global health.

    この発想はいたって簡単で

  • The idea is actually quite simple. The idea is,

    もし医療専門家が足りないのであれば

  • when you're short of specialized health care professionals,

    その地域にいる人材に

  • use whoever is available in the community,

    様々な医療介入の訓練を行うということです

  • train them to provide a range of health care interventions,

    本にはいくつもの素晴らしい例が 紹介されていました

  • and in these books I read inspiring examples,

    例えば 普通の人々が訓練を受け

  • for example of how ordinary people had been trained

    出産を助けたり

  • to deliver babies,

    初期の肺炎を 効果的に 診断し治療するといったものです

  • diagnose and treat early pneumonia, to great effect.

    もし普通の人々が訓練を受けることによって

  • And it struck me that if you could train ordinary people

    複雑な医療処置が出来るまでになるならば

  • to deliver such complex health care interventions,

    メンタルヘルスの分野でも

  • then perhaps they could also do the same

    それが可能かもしれないと思ったのです

  • with mental health care.

    うれしいことに この十年で世界中の発展途上国で

  • Well today, I'm very pleased to report to you

    メンタルヘルス関係のタスク・シフティング実験が

  • that there have been many experiments in task shifting

    多数行われてきました

  • in mental health care across the developing world

    今日はその内の三つの結果を

  • over the past decade, and I want to share with you

    報告したいと思います

  • the findings of three particular such experiments,

    それらはすべて精神障害で最も多い

  • all three of which focused on depression,

    うつ病に関するものです

  • the most common of all mental illnesses.

    ウガンダの地方でポール・ボルトン氏とその同僚は

  • In rural Uganda, Paul Bolton and his colleagues,

    村人がうつ病患者のために

  • using villagers, demonstrated that they could deliver

    対人精神療法を行うことができると証明しました

  • interpersonal psychotherapy for depression

    ランダム化比較試験を行った際

  • and, using a randomized control design,

    この介入を受けた人々の90パーセントの症状が

  • showed that 90 percent of the people receiving

    回復したのに比べて

  • this intervention recovered as compared

    比較対照の村ではおよそ40パーセントが回復しました

  • to roughly 40 percent in the comparison villages.

    同様に パキスタンの地方で行われた ランダム化比較試験では

  • Similarly, using a randomized control trial in rural Pakistan,

    アティフ・ラマンとその同僚が

  • Atif Rahman and his colleagues showed

    パキスタンの医療システムで働く

  • that lady health visitors, who are community maternal

    母体管理担当の女性保健師が

  • health workers in Pakistan's health care system,

    うつ病である母親に対して 認知行動療法を行った結果

  • could deliver cognitive behavior therapy for mothers

    回復率が著しく上がることを証明しました

  • who were depressed, again showing dramatic differences

    およそ75パーセントの母親が回復を見せたのに比べ

  • in the recovery rates. Roughly 75 percent of mothers

    比較対照の村の回復率は

  • recovered as compared to about 45 percent

    およそ45パーセントでした

  • in the comparison villages.

    そして私がインドのゴアで行った実験では

  • And in my own trial in Goa, in India, we again showed

    訓練を受けた地域の一般カウンセラーが

  • that lay counselors drawn from local communities

    うつ病や不安神経症に対して心理社会的介入を行った場合

  • could be trained to deliver psychosocial interventions

    70パーセントの回復率を見せましたが

  • for depression, anxiety, leading to 70 percent

    比較対照の一次医療センターでは

  • recovery rates as compared to 50 percent

    50パーセントでした

  • in the comparison primary health centers.

    このような実験結果や

  • Now, if I had to draw together all these different

    多数ある他のタスク・シフティングの結果を分析し

  • experiments in task shifting, and there have of course

    タスク・シフティングが成功するためには

  • been many other examples, and try and identify

    何の要素が鍵となっているのか突き詰め

  • what are the key lessons we can learn that makes

    教訓を学んでいく必要があります

  • for a successful task shifting operation,

    そのために私はSUNDARという頭字語を作り出しました

  • I have coined this particular acronym, SUNDAR.

    SUNDARはヒンズー語で『魅力的』と言う意味です

  • What SUNDAR stands for, in Hindi, is "attractive."

    タスク・シフティングが効率的に行われるには

  • It seems to me that there are five key lessons

    このスライドに表示した 五つのコンセプトが

  • that I've shown on this slide that are critically important

    非常に重要であると考えます

  • for effective task shifting.

    最初の教訓は メッセージを簡潔にし

  • The first is that we need to simplify the message

    医療で使われているような専門用語を

  • that we're using, stripping away all the jargon

    切り捨ててしまうことです

  • that medicine has invented around itself.

    複雑なヘルスケアの介入を 小さな要素に噛み砕き

  • We need to unpack complex health care interventions

    専門家ではない人々にも

  • into smaller components that can be more easily

    伝授できるようにすること

  • transferred to less-trained individuals.

    大きな施設だけでなく 患者の家の近所でも

  • We need to deliver health care, not in large institutions,

    ヘルスケアを提供すること

  • but close to people's homes, and we need to deliver

    その地域の人材で 高くつかない人々を使って

  • health care using whoever is available and affordable

    ヘルスケアを提供すること

  • in our local communities.

    そして大切なのは

  • And importantly, we need to reallocate the few specialists

    能力開発や指導ができる数人の専門家を

  • who are available to perform roles

    必要な地域へ配置することです

  • such as capacity-building and supervision.

    今の私にとってタスク・シフティングとは

  • Now for me, task shifting is an idea

    世界的な重要性を持つ発想です

  • with truly global significance,

    発展途上国の人手不足を補うために

  • because even though it has arisen out of the

    生まれた発想ですが

  • situation of the lack of resources that you find

    環境の整った国々でも重要であると考えます

  • in developing countries, I think it has a lot of significance

    何故かというと

  • for better-resourced countries as well. Why is that?

    先進国でも医療費は急上昇し

  • Well, in part, because health care in the developed world,

    手に負えなくなってきており

  • the health care costs in the [developed] world,

    その大半を占めているのは

  • are rapidly spiraling out of control, and a huge chunk

    人件費だからです

  • of those costs are human resource costs.

    同じく重要なのは

  • But equally important is because health care has become

    医療が非常に専門的になるにつれて

  • so incredibly professionalized that it's become very remote

    地域社会とはかけ離れた存在に なってしまったということです

  • and removed from local communities.

    私にとってタスク・シフティングが最も魅力的なのは

  • For me, what's truly sundar about the idea of task shifting,

    医療が誰にでも利用ができ

  • though, isn't that it simply makes health care

    手頃になることだけでなく

  • more accessible and affordable but that

    根本的に人々を力づけることもできるからです

  • it is also fundamentally empowering.

    普通の人々が もっと効果的に地域社会の健康のケアを

  • It empowers ordinary people to be more effective

    行うことが出来れば

  • in caring for the health of others in their community,

    自分の健康をも守ることができるのです

  • and in doing so, to become better guardians

    私にとってタスク・シフティングとは

  • of their own health. Indeed, for me, task shifting

    医療知識の民主化の極みであり

  • is the ultimate example of the democratization

    医療の力の極みです

  • of medical knowledge, and therefore, medical power.

    30年以上前 世界の諸国はアルマ・アタに集結し

  • Just over 30 years ago, the nations of the world assembled

    この象徴的な宣言をしました

  • at Alma-Ata and made this iconic declaration.

    皆さんも理解していると思いますが

  • Well, I think all of you can guess

    期日から12年過ぎても その目標には遠く及びません

  • that 12 years on, we're still nowhere near that goal.

    しかし 一般の人々を訓練すれば

  • Still, today, armed with that knowledge

    様々な医療介入を効率的に行えるようになる

  • that ordinary people in the community

    もちろん十分な指導とサポートの提供も重要です

  • can be trained and, with sufficient supervision and support,

    しかしその知識を得たことによって もしかしたら

  • can deliver a range of health care interventions effectively,

    この希望にも手が届くところまで来たのかもしれません

  • perhaps that promise is within reach now.

    「すべての人々に健康を」のスローガンを実行するには

  • Indeed, to implement the slogan of Health for All,

    その過程にすべての人々が

  • we will need to involve all

    関わる必要があります

  • in that particular journey,

    更にメンタルヘルスにおいては

  • and in the case of mental health, in particular we would

    特に精神障害の患者と

  • need to involve people who are affected by mental illness

    その介護者の協力が必要です

  • and their caregivers.

    このために 数年前

  • It is for this reason that, some years ago,

    国際精神保健運動が設立されました

  • the Movement for Global Mental Health was founded

    私のような専門家と

  • as a sort of a virtual platform upon which professionals

    精神障害を患っている人々が