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  • PETE FRISELLA: Hi, everybody.

  • My name's Pete Frisella.

  • I'm a developer advocate on the Google Analytics team.

  • I'd like to introduce you to a new series we have called "Off

  • the Charts." This series is about getting into the deep

  • features of Google Analytics, understanding how it works,

  • things you can do with it, and how to use the feature itself.

  • So today, I'd like actually talk to you about getting

  • started with cost data upload, and this is all about

  • measuring non-Google paid campaigns.

  • So let's talk about what is cost data upload.

  • I'll kind of get into little bit more about what that means

  • and what cost data upload works, how it works and the

  • feature itself.

  • Then we'll go into the architectural overview, which

  • explains the deep details and also how you would actually go

  • about uploading data to Google Analytics.

  • And then finally, we'll talk a little bit about some

  • opportunities that are available from a developer

  • perspective and also from a business perspective.

  • So with that, we'll get started.

  • So what is cost data upload, and what does

  • cost data itself mean?

  • So this is all related to all the paid campaigns you may be

  • running out there, all the information that's related to

  • that paid campaign.

  • Whether it be ad costs, clicks, impressions, the name

  • of the campaign, all this itself relates to cost data.

  • It's what we refer to as cost data in Google Analytics.

  • So for example, if you are running a campaign, say with

  • Google AdWords, for example, you'll know this is pretty

  • familiar for you.

  • You've got cost data, and if you link that to Google

  • Analytics, which is what you should be doing, you actually

  • get these reports within Google Analytics that

  • highlight, for your paid campaigns, how they're

  • performing.

  • And they give you a lot more information around how to

  • optimize certain key words, maybe landing page

  • optimization.

  • Now, these things are important things, but to

  • really do this analysis, you need that cost data associated

  • with the campaigns that you're running in Google AdWords.

  • And this linking works really well today, and it takes care

  • of all that for you.

  • And it gives you some powerful tools to take care of analysis

  • around campaigns and user interaction, and how campaigns

  • are performing.

  • The thing is, though, for a lot of people, why we

  • encourage you to use Google AdWords, we love Google

  • AdWords, obviously.

  • There is other paid campaign services out there that people

  • obviously use, and that includes things like other

  • paid search services.

  • You might be running in a campaign on a social network.

  • You might be doing email marketing campaigns.

  • So all of these campaigns are running out there, and you're

  • getting users visiting your website or your property from

  • these paid campaigns, and that's great.

  • You're able to track what they're doing, the conversions

  • possibly that are taking place, goal completions.

  • And you're getting a good general sense of which paid

  • campaigns are driving traffic to your site.

  • This is great.

  • So a report like this, that I'm showing here right now, is

  • kind of common that you're looking at, for my particular

  • campaigns, how are they performing and what kind of

  • traffic is coming to my site because these campaigns?

  • Now, you see that first row there, row number one, is a

  • Google AdWords campaign.

  • And you'll notice while you have user interaction data

  • such as visits, and you have impressions and clicks cost

  • data, you don't get the same kind of visual in cost data

  • that you would have for AdWords.

  • You don't get the same data for the other paid campaigns

  • that you may have.

  • So for example, we have an AdWords network campaign

  • running, and we have an affiliate

  • network campaign running.

  • And you'll see, we know people are coming to the site, but we

  • don't have the cost data within GA to do that analysis.

  • There's kind of two things missing around this then.

  • For the particular paid campaign itself, being able to

  • analyze that in terms of the ROI and the metrics you might

  • be getting.

  • Click-through rate, cost per click, things like that, you

  • kind of miss out on that.

  • And then also, you don't really have the ability to

  • compare how these services are performing against each other.

  • So is the AdWords network driving more?

  • Better conversions, or is Google AdWords driving better

  • conversions?

  • So you're missing that kind of complete view, that complete

  • analysis, around your cost data across all your different

  • paid campaigns that you might be having for all online

  • advertising and digital marketing.

  • But cost data kind of solves that problem.

  • When we launched this feature about a month ago, we had some

  • success stories right off the bat with a couple customers,

  • working with partners of ours to get something in place and

  • a solution for them.

  • So, for example, we talked Next Analytics and Cardinal

  • Path, and they came up with a solution that

  • uses cost data upload.

  • And they worked with Natural Wellbeing.

  • And really, it was around fully automating this process

  • for them, so being able to take their cost data

  • automatically, export it, and upload it into Google

  • Analytics using this new feature.

  • And it worked really well for them in saving them a lot of

  • time and doing this full automation.

  • We also did the same thing with ShufflePoint and E-Nor.

  • They came up with a solution using cost data upload again

  • to help OEMPCWorld.

  • And this one was really about, again, fully automation.

  • And a lot of the analysis they were doing was kind of a

  • manual process where you had your Google AdWords data, you

  • had some other campaigns.

  • You had to manually bring that stuff together and do analysis

  • outside of GA.

  • So this new feature really allowed them to bring all that

  • into Google Analytics and to do that complete analysis

  • within the product itself.

  • So it saved them a lot of time, fully automated, a great

  • solution for them.

  • So I think it would be good just to start off with a quick

  • demo to show you how this actually works.

  • And then we're going to dive into details, and I can give

  • you a little bit more background on how these actual

  • steps that involved to do this.

  • Sometimes, it's just easier to show you how it works, so I'll

  • start off with a report.

  • This is within Google Analytics.

  • It's a custom report, and the example here is that I have a

  • paid search ad running, and it's for an ad network.

  • It's a CPC, and it's for the keyword

  • "dogbone." And I can see--

  • so I've tagged my URLs, and I'll get into that

  • a little bit later.

  • So I know that someone's clicked on the URL, and

  • they've visited my property, and I can see that there's

  • been two visits.

  • But just as how I described before, we don't have

  • any cost data here.

  • But the thing is, I actually do have the cost data.

  • The service provider that I'm using allows me to

  • export the cost data.

  • I just don't have it in GA, so that's really

  • what I want to do.

  • I want to have that same data available in GA so I can do

  • analysis and can carry out cost analysis.

  • So just something to note here, the source is Ad

  • Network, the medium is CPC, and the keyword is "dogbone."

  • So as I mentioned, I actually do have this cost data.

  • So you can imagine that I exported this from the paid

  • search provider and have it in CSV file.

  • And there's a header up here that has some dimensions that

  • I'll explain later.

  • But in row two, we can see the same values that I just showed

  • you in report are actually here.

  • We have Ad Network as a source, CPC is our medium, and

  • we have this keyword here, "dogbone."

  • And there's that cost data I was talking about.

  • We have impressions, we have clicks, and we have ad cost,

  • so I have this data.

  • It's there.

  • It's available, and there was a couple other

  • keywords that I ran also.

  • Now, let's actually upload it and see how this process

  • works, and then we'll see--

  • once it's available in the report, you'll see how it's

  • actually joined together.

  • So I have a little script.

  • It's a Python script, just to kind of test things and see

  • how it's working, how the feature works.

  • I'll start off with--

  • there's this new entity called custom data source.

  • I can also explain what this means in a little bit, but

  • basically, you upload the cost data to a custom data source,

  • and you specify which date you'd like to upload

  • the cost data for.

  • So, in this example, this cost data actually is from

  • yesterday, so I exported all of the cost data and metrics

  • from yesterday into a CSV file, and it's

  • available to upload.

  • So I'm going to select the custom data source that I want

  • to upload to.

  • And I'll show you how this process works.

  • So I have quite a few accounts here.

  • I want to upload to the My Store account.

  • I will select the web property, and then here's what

  • I'm talking about in terms of custom data sources.

  • I have three set up, and I'm just going to choose the first

  • one, the Ad Network custom data source.

  • So now I've selected it.

  • If I go back up, you'll see now that it's actually

  • selected, here, Ad Network, and then also the account and

  • the web property.

  • And then the upload data again is 2012, November 28.

  • So I will do an upload of cost data, which is

  • number three here.

  • I know the file that I showed you, what the name of it is.

  • Oops.

  • Spelled that wrong.

  • OK, so it's actually uploading right now to Google Analytics

  • to that customer data source, and if all goes successful,

  • we'll get a response back from the server

  • saying it was a success.

  • So it takes a little bit of time to process the data.

  • It's not going to show up instantly.

  • I will go back to the presentation.

  • It could take anywhere from a few minutes to up to 12 hours,

  • so you should see data within 12 hours.

  • Depending on the kind of load and your profile and web

  • property, it could take a little longer.

  • I'm going to actually go back to the presentation.

  • We've successfully uploaded cost data.

  • I'll come back a little bit later, and we'll see if it's

  • available in the report and if it's been joined

  • to our actual campaign.

  • In the meantime, let's talk about architectural overview,

  • how this feature works, and how you would actually go

  • about uploading cost data.

  • So there's quite a few steps involved, but they're all

  • pretty simple.

  • The first four are really around how to prepare for a

  • successful upload.

  • And the fifth is really around reporting and how you would do

  • analysis, the tools that are available for that within GA.

  • We'll start with tagging campaign URLS.

  • So obviously, the primary benefit to this feature is

  • that you're able to join that user interaction data that's

  • already in GA that you have, and you're able to join that

  • with the cost data that might sit somewhere externally.

  • So bringing those two together is really a huge benefit here.

  • But in order to do that, it's important that you use

  • campaign tracking parameters, so you should

  • be doing this anyways.

  • But the important part of this is that the campaign tracking

  • parameters, the values you use as part of the campaign,

  • should or have to match the values that you're uploading

  • through cost data upload feature.

  • So I'll explain a little bit more in detail what this

  • means, but basically, they have to match, and if they

  • match, then they'll actually get joined

  • together in that case.

  • So in this example here, I have an ad running.

  • It's not a Google ad.

  • It's another paid search provider.

  • The link there actually has UTM parameters as part of it,

  • these campaign tracking parameters, and I've specified