Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • (Video) Announcer: Threats, in the wake of Bin Laden's death, have spiked.

    (ビデオ) キャスター: ビン・ラディンの死を受けて テロ脅威への緊張が急増・・・

  • Announcer Two: Famine in Somalia. Announcer Three: Police pepper spray.

    ソマリアでの飢餓が・・・ 警察が催涙ガスを・・・

  • Announcer Four: Vicious cartels. Announcer Five: Caustic cruise lines.

    悪質なカルテルが・・・ 豪華客船の転覆・・・

  • Announcer Six: Societal decay. Announcer Seven: 65 dead.

    社会の腐敗が・・・ 65人の死亡者が・・・

  • Announcer Eight: Tsunami warning. Announcer Nine: Cyberattacks.

    津波警報が・・・ サイバーテロが・・・

  • Multiple Announcers: Drug war. Mass destruction. Tornado.

    麻薬戦争・・・ 大量破壊・・・ 竜巻・・・

  • Recession. Default. Doomsday. Egypt. Syria.

    景気後退・・・ 破綻・・・ 破滅・・・ エジプト・・・ シリア・・・

  • Crisis. Death. Disaster.

    危機・・・ 死・・・ 大災害・・・

  • Oh, my God.

    なんてひどい・・・

  • Peter Diamandis: So those are just a few of the clips

    ディアマンディス: これは ここ6カ月の

  • I collected over the last six months --

    ニュース映像の一部にすぎません

  • could have easily been the last six days

    過去6日分でも 6年分を集めても

  • or the last six years.

    同じようなものになったでしょう

  • The point is that the news media

    言いたいのは ニュース報道が

  • preferentially feeds us negative stories

    悲劇的な出来事ばかりを 見せているということです

  • because that's what our minds pay attention to.

    私たちが 悲劇的なものに 注目するからです

  • And there's a very good reason for that.

    これにはもっともな理由があります

  • Every second of every day,

    人間の脳がとても処理しきれないような

  • our senses bring in way too much data

    膨大な情報が全感覚を通して

  • than we can possibly process in our brains.

    一瞬たりとも休むことなく 流れ込んできます

  • And because nothing is more important to us

    生き残ることが最も大切な為

  • than survival,

    この膨大な量の情報が

  • the first stop of all of that data

    最初に向かうのは

  • is an ancient sliver of the temporal lobe

    扁桃体と呼ばれる 脳の側頭葉にある

  • called the amygdala.

    原始的で小さい組織です

  • Now the amygdala is our early warning detector,

    扁桃体は 早期に警戒すべき状況を 察知する仕組で

  • our danger detector.

    危険を知らせる警報器です

  • It sorts and scours through all of the information

    扁桃体は あらゆる情報を整理して 周囲の環境の中に

  • looking for anything in the environment that might harm us.

    害を及ぼしそうなものが無いか探ります

  • So given a dozen news stories,

    私たちは一連のニュースを聞いたら

  • we will preferentially look

    まずは悲劇的なニュースに

  • at the negative news.

    目を向けるようにできています

  • And that old newspaper saying,

    新聞業界の古い格言の

  • "If it bleeds it leads,"

    「血まみれなら大きく扱う」 に従うのは

  • is very true.

    まったくの正解です

  • So given all of our digital devices

    最近ではさらに 24時間365日

  • that are bringing all the negative news to us

    悲劇的なニュースばかりを

  • seven days a week, 24 hours a day,

    私たちの周りのデジタル機器が 流していることを考えれば

  • it's no wonder that we're pessimistic.

    悲観的になってもしかたがありません

  • It's no wonder that people think

    世界がどんどん悪い方向へ

  • that the world is getting worse.

    進んでいくと人々が考えても しかたがありません

  • But perhaps that's not the case.

    しかし おそらく 現実は違います

  • Perhaps instead,

    おそらく そうではなくて

  • it's the distortions brought to us

    現実が歪められて

  • of what's really going on.

    伝えられているのです

  • Perhaps the tremendous progress we've made

    さまざまな原動力によって

  • over the last century

    この1世紀の間でとげてきた

  • by a series of forces

    膨大な進歩は さらに加速して

  • are, in fact, accelerating to a point

    来たる30年間で

  • that we have the potential in the next three decades

    何も尽きることがない世界を

  • to create a world of abundance.

    築ける可能性がある状態まで来ています

  • Now I'm not saying

    もちろん 一連の問題が無いと

  • we don't have our set of problems --

    言っているわけではなく

  • climate crisis, species extinction,

    気候変動の危機 絶滅危惧種

  • water and energy shortage -- we surely do.

    水資源やエネルギー資源の枯渇などの 一連の問題があります

  • And as humans, we are far better

    しかし人類は

  • at seeing the problems way in advance,

    問題を十分に余裕をもって 察知することに長けてる上に

  • but ultimately we knock them down.

    最終的には 問題を 片づけてしまうのです

  • So let's look

    将来がどうなるか 理解するために

  • at what this last century has been

    この1世紀がどんなものだったか

  • to see where we're going.

    振り返って見てみましょう

  • Over the last hundred years,

    この100年間で

  • the average human lifespan has more than doubled,

    平均寿命は 2倍以上になり

  • average per capita income adjusted for inflation

    1人当たりの平均収入は インフレを差し引いても

  • around the world has tripled.

    3倍になっています

  • Childhood mortality

    乳幼児の死亡率は

  • has come down a factor of 10.

    10分の1に低下しました

  • Add to that the cost of food, electricity,

    これに加えて 食糧コスト

  • transportation, communication

    電力 輸送 移動 伝達手段のコストは

  • have dropped 10 to 1,000-fold.

    それぞれ10分の1程度から 1,000分の1程度に低下しました

  • Steve Pinker has showed us

    スティーブ・ピンカーの発表によれば

  • that, in fact, we're living during the most peaceful time ever

    実は 人類は歴史上 もっとも平穏な時代を

  • in human history.

    過ごしています

  • And Charles Kenny

    また チャールス・ケニーによれば

  • that global literacy has gone from 25 percent to over 80 percent

    この130年間で 25パーセントだった

  • in the last 130 years.

    世界の識字率は80パーセントに増加しています

  • We truly are living in an extraordinary time.

    私たちは 本当に たぐいまれな時代を過ごしています

  • And many people forget this.

    多くの人がこれを忘れて

  • And we keep setting our expectations higher and higher.

    期待する目標を より高く変え続けているのです

  • In fact, we redefine what poverty means.

    実際 私たちは貧困の意味を 再定義しています

  • Think of this, in America today,

    考えてみてください 今アメリカでは

  • the majority of people under the poverty line

    政府が決めた貧困水準以下で 暮らす人でさえ

  • still have electricity, water, toilets, refrigerators,

    大部分の人が 電気 水道 トイレ 冷蔵庫 テレビ

  • television, mobile phones,

    携帯電話 エアコン そして

  • air conditioning and cars.

    車までも持っています

  • The wealthiest robber barons of the last century, the emperors on this planet,

    前世紀では世界級の富豪『泥棒男爵』や 皇帝たちでさえも

  • could have never dreamed of such luxuries.

    こんな贅沢な状況は 夢にも思わなかったでしょう

  • Underpinning much of this

    これを支えた大きなものは

  • is technology,

    新技術でした

  • and of late,

    とくに最近では

  • exponentially growing technologies.

    指数関数的に 成長する技術です

  • My good friend Ray Kurzweil

    親しい友人のレイ・カーツワイルが

  • showed that any tool that becomes an information technology

    情報技術で扱うことになれば どんな装置でも ムーアの法則の

  • jumps on this curve, on Moore's Law,

    この曲線に従って 伸びていくと教えてくれました

  • and experiences price performance doubling

    対価格性能が

  • every 12 to 24 months.

    12カ月から24カ月毎に 倍になるという経験をします

  • That's why the cellphone in your pocket

    みなさんのポケットにある携帯電話は

  • is literally a million times cheaper and a thousand times faster

    70年代のスーパーコンピュータよりも

  • than a supercomputer of the '70s.

    まさに 百万倍も安く 千倍も速いのです

  • Now look at this curve.

    この曲線を見てみてください

  • This is Moore's Law over the last hundred years.

    ここ100年間の ムーアの法則の表です

  • I want you to notice two things from this curve.

    2つのことに注目してください

  • Number one, how smooth it is --

    1つ目は なだらかな 乱れのない曲線ということです

  • through good time and bad time, war time and peace time,

    良い時も悪い時も 戦時も平時も

  • recession, depression and boom time.

    景気後退や恐慌 ブームやバブル時もです

  • This is the result of faster computers

    これは速いコンピュータを設計するのに

  • being used to build faster computers.

    法則の想定よりも速いコンピュータを 使ったからです

  • It doesn't slow for any of our grand challenges.

    地球規模の課題に直面した時でも 成長速度は落ちていません

  • And also, even though it's plotted

    2つ目は 縦軸は対数で目盛をとって

  • on a log curve on the left,

    線を引いたにも関わらず

  • it's curving upwards.

    線が直線よりも上向きに上っています

  • The rate at which the technology is getting faster

    技術が向上する速度までも

  • is itself getting faster.

    さらに速くなっていくのです

  • And on this curve, riding on Moore's Law,

    ムーアの法則の通りにうまくいくなら

  • are a set of extraordinarily powerful technologies

    常に桁はずれの強力な技術が出現しつづけることを

  • available to all of us.

    この曲線が示しています

  • Cloud computing,

    クラウドコンピューティング

  • what my friends at Autodesk call infinite computing;

    オートデスクが呼ぶには インフィニットコンピューティング

  • sensors and networks; robotics;

    センサー、ネットワーク、ロボット

  • 3D printing, which is the ability to democratize and distribute

    3D プリンタ技術 これは 生産作業を大衆化し

  • personalized production around the planet;

    個別生産を広げる力があります

  • synthetic biology;

    合成生物学

  • fuels, vaccines and foods;

    多様な燃料 ワクチン 食品

  • digital medicine; nanomaterials; and A.I.

    デジタル医療 ナノテク素材 そして人工知能

  • I mean, how many of you saw the winning of Jeopardy

    人工知能の例です クイズの ジョパディでIBMのワトソンが

  • by IBM's Watson?

    勝つのを見た人は どれくらいいますか?

  • I mean, that was epic.

    それは 素晴らしい瞬間でした

  • In fact, I scoured the headlines

    実は 一番響く新聞の見出しを

  • looking for the best headline in a newspaper I could.

    全力で探していました

  • And I love this: "Watson Vanquishes Human Opponents."

    この一文です「ワトソン が 人間の対戦相手を打ち負かした」

  • Jeopardy's not an easy game.

    ジョパディは簡単なゲームではありません

  • It's about the nuance of human language.

    人が使う言語のニュアンスがわかる必要があります

  • And imagine if you would

    想像してください みなさんが

  • A.I.'s like this on the cloud

    クラウド上にあり

  • available to every person with a cellphone.

    こんな高性能の人工知能を 携帯電話で使えます

  • Four years ago here at TED,

    4年前 まさにこの TED で 私と

  • Ray Kurzweil and I started a new university

    レイ・カーツワイルは シンギュラリティ大学

  • called Singularity University.

    という新しい大学を 作りました

  • And we teach our students all of these technologies,

    大学で教えるのは 最先端技術ですが 同時に

  • and particularly how they can be used

    これらの技術が 人類全体の課題を

  • to solve humanity's grand challenges.

    解決するのに どう使えるかを教えます

  • And every year we ask them

    また 毎年生徒に

  • to start a company or a product or a service

    10年以内に 10億の人の生活に

  • that can affect positively the lives of a billion people

    影響を及ぼせるような 会社や製品やサービスを

  • within a decade.

    創るよう課題を出しています

  • Think about that, the fact that, literally, a group of students

    考えてみてください ただの学生の集団が

  • can touch the lives of a billion people today.

    10億人の生活に影響を 与える可能性があるという現状は

  • 30 years ago that would have sounded ludicrous.

    30年前にはただの冗談だったでしょう

  • Today we can point at dozens of companies

    こんにちでは それを 成し遂げた会社を

  • that have done just that.

    数十社は数えられるでしょう

  • When I think about creating abundance,

    尽きることのない状態を創り出す ということで私が考えているのは

  • it's not about creating a life of luxury for everybody on this planet;

    地球上にすむ全員に 贅沢なものを与えることではなく

  • it's about creating a life of possibility.

    可能性のあることを 試みようとすることです

  • It is about taking that which was scarce

    希少だったものを 尽きることのないものに

  • and making it abundant.

    することです

  • You see, scarcity is contextual,

    ご存知のように 希少かどうかは その背景によります

  • and technology is a resource-liberating force.

    新技術は資源を自由に使えるようにする 原動力になります

  • Let me give you an example.

    例をご紹介します

  • So this is a story of Napoleon III

    これは 1800年代半ばの

  • in the mid-1800s.

    ナポレオン3世の話です

  • He's the dude on the left.

    この写真の左のひとです

  • He invited over to dinner

    シャムの王を

  • the king of Siam.

    夕食に招待しました

  • All of Napoleon's troops

    ナポレオンの兵は

  • were fed with silver utensils,

    銀食器で食事を取りました

  • Napoleon himself with gold utensils.

    ナポレオン本人は金食器でした

  • But the King of Siam,

    しかし シャム王は

  • he was fed with aluminum utensils.

    アルミニウムの食器で食事しました

  • You see, aluminum

    ご存知のように アルミニウムは

  • was the most valuable metal on the planet,

    当時 地球上でもっとも価値ある金属でした

  • worth more than gold and platinum.

    金よりもプラチナよりも価値があるとされていました

  • It's the reason that the tip of the Washington Monument

    価値があったが故に ワシントン記念塔の冠石が

  • is made of aluminum.

    アルミニウムで出来ているのです

  • You see, even though aluminum

    わかりますか アルミニウムは

  • is 8.3 percent of the Earth by mass,

    地球全体の8.3パーセントを 占めているにも関わらず

  • it doesn't come as a pure metal.

    純粋な金属としては存在していません

  • It's all bound by oxygen and silicates.

    アルミニウムはケイ素と酸素に 結合してしまっています

  • But then the technology of electrolysis came along

    しかし ある時 電気分解の技術が 使えるようになって

  • and literally made aluminum so cheap

    アルミニウムをすごく安いものにしたので

  • that we use it with throw-away mentality.

    文字通り 湯水のように使える程になりました

  • So let's project this analogy going forward.

    この類推を今後の人類の姿に例えて 予想してみましょう

  • We think about energy scarcity.

    人類は エネルギーの枯渇を考えますが

  • Ladies and gentlemen,

    よろしいですか

  • we are on a planet

    私たちがいるこの地球は

  • that is bathed with 5,000 times more energy

    1年で私たちが使用するエネルギーの

  • than we use in a year.

    5千倍のエネルギーを 浴びています

  • 16 terawatts of energy hits the Earth's surface

    88分ごとに

  • every 88 minutes.

    16テラワットのエネルギーが 地球の表面に降り注いでいます

  • It's not about being scarce,

    つまり 何が希少かということではなく

  • it's about accessibility.

    利用可能かどうかということなのです

  • And there's good news here.

    ここで いいお知らせがあります

  • For the first time, this year

    これまでで初めて

  • the cost of solar-generated electricity

    今年インドでは 太陽光発電費用が

  • is 50 percent that of diesel-generated electricity in India --

    ディーゼル発電費用の半分になったのです

  • 8.8 rupees versus 17 rupees.

    太陽光 8.8 ルピー対 ディーゼル17 ルピーです

  • The cost of solar dropped 50 percent last year.

    去年 太陽光の費用が 半値になりました

  • Last month, MIT put out a study

    先月 MIT が発表した研究では

  • showing that by the end of this decade,

    2020年迄には アメリカでは

  • in the sunny parts of the United States,

    太陽光電力費用の国内平均が

  • solar electricity will be six cents a kilowatt hour

    1ワット当たり15セントになり

  • compared to 15 cents

    太陽が良く当たる場所なら

  • as a national average.

    6セントになると予測しています

  • And if we have abundant energy,

    もし エネルギーが尽きないとすれば

  • we also have abundant water.

    水資源も尽きないのです

  • Now we talk about water wars.

    今度は 水資源獲得の争いや論争について話しましょう

  • Do you remember

    1990年にボイジャーが

  • when Carl Sagan turned the Voyager spacecraft

    土星を通過した直後 カール・セーガンが

  • back towards the Earth,

    探査機の向きを変えさせて

  • in 1990 after it just passed Saturn?

    地球を撮らせたのを 覚えていますか?

  • He took a famous photo. What was it called?

    その時有名な写真を撮りました なんて呼んでいましたか?

  • "A Pale Blue Dot."

    「淡く青い点」

  • Because we live on a water planet.

    水に満ちた惑星にいるからです

  • We live on a planet 70 percent covered by water.

    70パーセントが水に包まれた 惑星の上に生きています

  • Yes, 97.5 percent is saltwater,

    もちろん 97.5パーセントは海水で

  • two percent is ice,

    2パーセントは氷です

  • and we fight over a half a percent of the water on this planet,

    この惑星の残りの 0.5 パーセントの水を 争っています

  • but here too there is hope.

    しかし ここにも希望があります

  • And there is technology coming online,

    技術がオンラインで広まってきています

  • not 10, 20 years from now,

    10年後20年後というのではなく

  • right now.

    今存在しているのです

  • There's nanotechnology coming on, nanomaterials.

    ナノテクもあります ナノテク素材です

  • And the conversation I had with Dean Kamen this morning,

    また こんな話もあります 今朝 自作発明家のひとり

  • one of the great DIY innovators,

    ディーン・ケーメンと話しました

  • I'd like to share with you -- he gave me permission to do so --

    彼も許可してくれたので 彼が発明したスリングショットという

  • his technology called Slingshot

    技術を紹介したいと 思います

  • that many of you may have heard of,

    皆さんもご存知かもしれませんが

  • it is the size of a small dorm room refrigerator.

    独り暮らし用冷蔵庫くらいの 大きさです

  • It's able to generate

    これは 塩水 汚染水 トイレの水などの

  • a thousand liters of clean drinking water a day

    どんなものの水分でも

  • out of any source -- saltwater, polluted water, latrine --

    1リットルあたり2セント以下の費用で

  • at less than two cents a liter.

    一日1000 リットルの速度で 飲み水に変えられます

  • The chairman of Coca-Cola has just agreed

    つい最近 コカ・コーラの会長が

  • to do a major test

    開発途上国で 何百ものこの機械を

  • of hundreds of units of this in the developing world.

    使う大規模な実用化実験に合意しました

  • And if that pans out,

    もし 実験がうまくいけば -- もちろん

  • which I have every confidence it will,

    うまくいくと信じていますが --

  • Coca-Cola will deploy this globally

    コカ・コーラは

  • to 206 countries

    この機械を世界206 ヶ国に

  • around the planet.

    グローバル展開します

  • This is the kind of innovation, empowered by this technology,

    これは 現在存在している

  • that exists today.

    技術の力を借りて実現できた技術革新といえるでしょう

  • And we've seen this in cellphones.

    人類は携帯電話でも同じ現象を見てきました

  • My goodness, we're going to hit 70 percent penetration

    すごいのは 2013年末には

  • of cellphones in the developing world

    開発途上国での携帯電話の普及率が

  • by the end of 2013.

    70 パーセントにも到達します

  • Think about it,

    考えてみてください

  • that a Masai warrior on a cellphone in the middle of Kenya

    ケニヤのどまんなかの マサイ族の戦士は

  • has better mobile comm

    レーガン大統領が 25年前に

  • than President Reagan did 25 years ago.

    持っていたよりも良い携帯装置を持つのです

  • And if they're on a smartphone on Google,

    スマートフォンでグーグルが使えれば

  • they've got access to more knowledge and information

    マサイ族は15年前のクリントン大統領よりも

  • than President Clinton did 15 years ago.

    多くの知識や情報を利用できます

  • They