Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Two twin domes,

    翻訳: Eriko T. 校正: Tomoyuki Suzuki

  • two radically opposed design cultures.

    この双子のようなドームは

  • One is made of thousands of steel parts,

    根本的に真逆のデザインから生まれました

  • the other of a single silk thread.

    一方は何千ものスチール部品から

  • One is synthetic, the other organic.

    もう一方は一本の絹の糸から作られています

  • One is imposed on the environment,

    前者は人工的で 後者は有機的です

  • the other creates it.

    前者は自然に割り込むように存在し

  • One is designed for nature, the other is designed by her.

    後者は自然を創り出します

  • Michelangelo said that when he looked at raw marble,

    前者は自然の為にデザインされ 後者は自然によりデザインされました

  • he saw a figure struggling to be free.

    ミケランジェロは 手つかずの大理石を目にして

  • The chisel was Michelangelo's only tool.

    解き放たれようとする 彫像が見えたと言います

  • But living things are not chiseled.

    「のみ」が彼の唯一の道具でした

  • They grow.

    しかし 生物は彫刻により生み出されるのではなく

  • And in our smallest units of life, our cells, we carry all the information

    成長していくのです

  • that's required for every other cell to function and to replicate.

    私たちの生命を作る 一番小さな単位 細胞には

  • Tools also have consequences.

    機能し自己複製する為に必要な あらゆる情報が詰め込まれています

  • At least since the Industrial Revolution, the world of design has been dominated

    道具を使うことの副作用もあります

  • by the rigors of manufacturing and mass production.

    産業革命以降 デザインの世界は

  • Assembly lines have dictated a world made of parts,

    製造 そして画一的な大量生産に 支配されて来ました

  • framing the imagination of designers and architects

    組み立てラインは 部品で構成された世界観を生み出し

  • who have been trained to think about their objects as assemblies

    デザイナーや建築家の想像力を狭め

  • of discrete parts with distinct functions.

    物事をそれぞれが個別の機能を持った 部品で出来上がったものと

  • But you don't find homogenous material assemblies in nature.

    捉えさせるようになりました

  • Take human skin, for example.

    しかし 自然は均質的な物質で 出来上がっているのではありません

  • Our facial skins are thin with large pores.

    人間の皮膚を例にとってみましょう

  • Our back skins are thicker, with small pores.

    私たちの顔の皮膚は薄く 大きな毛穴があります

  • One acts mainly as filter,

    しかし背中の皮膚は より分厚く 小さな毛穴が開いています

  • the other mainly as barrier,

    片方はフィルターとして働き

  • and yet it's the same skin: no parts, no assemblies.

    もう片方はバリヤーとして働きます

  • It's a system that gradually varies its functionality

    それでもどちらも同じ皮膚なのです 部品ごとに組み合わされたものではありません

  • by varying elasticity.

    これは弾力性が変化することにより 次第にその機能が変化していく

  • So here this is a split screen to represent my split world view,

    という仕組みなのです

  • the split personality of every designer and architect operating today

    この分割された画面は 私の分断された世界観を表現します

  • between the chisel and the gene,

    現代のデザイナーや建築家の 分裂したパーソナリティー を表します

  • between machine and organism, between assembly and growth,

    のみと遺伝子

  • between Henry Ford and Charles Darwin.

    機械と生物組織 組み立てと成長

  • These two worldviews, my left brain and right brain,

    ヘンリー・フォードとチャールズ・ダーウィン

  • analysis and synthesis, will play out on the two screens behind me.

    これらの対立する世界観 私の左脳と右脳

  • My work, at its simplest level,

    分割と統合 それらが背後の2つのスクリーンに現れます

  • is about uniting these two worldviews,

    私の仕事は最も端的には

  • moving away from assembly

    これらの2つの世界観を繋ぎ

  • and closer into growth.

    組み立てる世界から次第に離れ

  • You're probably asking yourselves:

    成長する世界へと近づくことです

  • Why now?

    皆さんは多分こう訝しがられているでしょう

  • Why was this not possible 10 or even five years ago?

    なぜ今そんなことを?

  • We live in a very special time in history,

    なぜ10年 いや5年前に それができなかったのだろう?

  • a rare time,

    私たちは史上とても稀有な時代に生きています

  • a time when the confluence of four fields is giving designers access to tools

    4つの領域が合わさり デザイナー達に 今まで手に入らなかったようなツールを

  • we've never had access to before.

    提供しているのですから

  • These fields are computational design,

    それらは 単純なコードで複雑な形をデザインする

  • allowing us to design complex forms with simple code;

    コンピュテーショナル・デザイン

  • additive manufacturing, letting us produce parts

    彫ることによって造り出すのではなく

  • by adding material rather than carving it out;

    既にあるものに加えることで作る 付加製造技術

  • materials engineering, which lets us design the behavior of materials

    非常に微細なレベルまで 素材の性質をデザインする

  • in high resolution;

    材料工学

  • and synthetic biology,

    そしてDNAを編集することで

  • enabling us to design new biological functionality by editing DNA.

    新たな機能性をデザインする 合成生物学です

  • And at the intersection of these four fields,

    私のチームは これらの4領域が交差する場所で

  • my team and I create.

    創造しています

  • Please meet the minds and hands

    私の生徒たちの思想と技術を

  • of my students.

    ご紹介しましょう

  • We design objects and products and structures and tools across scales,

    私たちはあらゆる大きさの物体や製品 そして構造を作り出しています

  • from the large-scale,

    可動式で直径24メートルの ロボット・アームによって

  • like this robotic arm with an 80-foot diameter reach

    いつかは建物自体までもを 印刷出来るようになる一方

  • with a vehicular base that will one day soon print entire buildings,

    遺伝子工学により改変された 暗闇で光る微生物による

  • to nanoscale graphics made entirely of genetically engineered microorganisms

    ナノスケールのグラフィックスまであります

  • that glow in the dark.

    私たちはアラブの古い建築様式の原型である

  • Here we've reimagined the mashrabiya,

    マシュラビーヤをデザインのベースとし

  • an archetype of ancient Arabic architecture,

    そこを通る光や熱を操れるように

  • and created a screen where every aperture is uniquely sized

    窓の大きさがそれぞれに異なる スクリーンを生み出しました

  • to shape the form of light and heat moving through it.

    次のプロジェクトでは

  • In our next project,

    イリス・ヴァン・ヘルペンの パリ・ファッションショーの為に

  • we explore the possibility of creating a cape and skirt --

    ただ一つのパーツから成る第二の皮膚のような

  • this was for a Paris fashion show with Iris van Herpen --

    ケープとスカートを実験的に作ってみました

  • like a second skin that are made of a single part,

    輪郭は硬く ウエストは柔軟なのです

  • stiff at the contours, flexible around the waist.

    昔から3D印刷技術で 協力しているストラタシス社と共に

  • Together with my long-term 3D printing collaborator Stratasys,

    この細胞間に縫い目の無い ケープとスカートをつくりました

  • we 3D-printed this cape and skirt with no seams between the cells,

    このような作品をもっとご覧にいれましょう

  • and I'll show more objects like it.

    このヘルメットは硬い素材と柔らかい素材を

  • This helmet combines stiff and soft materials

    20ミクロンのスケールで 組み合わせています

  • in 20-micron resolution.

    これは人の髪の太さや

  • This is the resolution of a human hair.

    CTスキャナーの解像度と同じ程度です

  • It's also the resolution of a CT scanner.

    デザイナー達は

  • That designers have access

    高分解能の解析・統合設計ツールを利用して

  • to such high-resolution analytic and synthetic tools,

    身体にフィットするだけでなく 身体組織の特性に合わせて

  • enables to design products that fit not only the shape of our bodies,

    デザインすることができます

  • but also the physiological makeup of our tissues.

    次に私たちは 防音効果のある椅子を作りました

  • Next, we designed an acoustic chair,

    構造的で 快適な椅子で

  • a chair that would be at once structural, comfortable

    音をも吸収します

  • and would also absorb sound.

    私の共同研究者 カーター教授と共に 私たちは自然を着想の源に

  • Professor Carter, my collaborator, and I turned to nature for inspiration,

    非均一的な表面パターンをデザインしました

  • and by designing this irregular surface pattern,

    それが防音効果を持つというわけです

  • it becomes sound-absorbent.

    44種の異なる特性を元に この椅子の表面は

  • We printed its surface out of 44 different properties,

    堅さ、透明度、色などを変化させ

  • varying in rigidity, opacity and color,

    体の力が掛かる場所に応じて 選んで印刷しました

  • corresponding to pressure points on the human body.

    この椅子の表面は 我々の体と同様に 場所に応じて変化しています

  • Its surface, as in nature, varies its functionality

    素材を新たに加えたり 組み立てたりせず

  • not by adding another material or another assembly,

    それ自体は途切れること無く次第に 繊細にその材質の特性を変化させているのです

  • but by continuously and delicately varying material property.

    でも 自然は理想的なのでしょうか?

  • But is nature ideal?

    自然には部品は存在し無いのでしょうか?

  • Are there no parts in nature?

    私は信仰深いユダヤ教の家庭に 育ったわけではありませんが

  • I wasn't raised in a religious Jewish home,

    若い頃

  • but when I was young,

    私の祖母がユダヤ教の聖書から 物語を引用し語ってくれました

  • my grandmother used to tell me stories from the Hebrew Bible,

    その中の一つがとても強く心に残り 多分に 私の価値観に影響を及ぼしました

  • and one of them stuck with me and came to define much of what I care about.

    祖母が語ったのは:

  • As she recounts:

    「創造の第3日目 神は地上に

  • "On the third day of Creation, God commands the Earth

    果実の実る木を生やすよう命ぜられた」

  • to grow a fruit-bearing fruit tree."

    この最初の木には 幹や枝 葉と果実 という

  • For this first fruit tree, there was to be no differentiation

    違いがある必要は 無かったはずだと思うのです

  • between trunk, branches, leaves and fruit.

    木全体が果実だったことでしょう

  • The whole tree was a fruit.

    代わりに 大地は幹や枝や花々をつけた 木々を生やしました

  • Instead, the land grew trees that have bark and stems and flowers.

    大地はパーツで構成された世界を創りだしたのです

  • The land created a world made of parts.

    よく自分にこう問いかけます

  • I often ask myself,

    「もし物体がたった一つのパーツで 構成されていたら どんなデザインになるだろう?

  • "What would design be like if objects were made of a single part?

    創造のより良い原点に立ち戻れるだろうか?」

  • Would we return to a better state of creation?"

    それで私たちは あの聖書に描かれる

  • So we looked for that biblical material,

    果実の実る木のような物体を探し出しました

  • that fruit-bearing fruit tree kind of material, and we found it.

    バイオポリマー(生体高分子)の中でも 2番目に豊富なものは キチン質と呼ばれ

  • The second-most abundant biopolymer on the planet is called chitin,

    毎年数億トン程のキチン質が

  • and some 100 million tons of it are produced every year

    エビやカニ、サソリや蝶により生成されています

  • by organisms such as shrimps, crabs, scorpions and butterflies.

    もしこの物質の性質を調整すれば

  • We thought if we could tune its properties,

    1つのパーツでありながら 複数の機能を持つ構造を

  • we could generate structures that are multifunctional

    生み出せるのではないかと思いました

  • out of a single part.

    それで やってみたのです

  • So that's what we did.

    まずリーガル・シーフード(レストラン)に電話しー

  • We called Legal Seafood --

    (笑)

  • (Laughter)

    たくさんのエビの殻を注文しました

  • we ordered a bunch of shrimp shells,

    それを磨り潰し キトサンのペーストを作り出しました

  • we grinded them and we produced chitosan paste.

    化学的濃度を変化させることで

  • By varying chemical concentrations,

    多様な範囲の特性を作り出すことができました

  • we were able to achieve a wide array of properties --

    濃い色で固く不透明な素材から

  • from dark, stiff and opaque,

    軽く柔らかで透明なものまで

  • to light, soft and transparent.

    この構造を大規模に3D印刷するために

  • In order to print the structures in large scale,

    機械的にコントロールされた 複数のノズルで射出するシステムをつくりました

  • we built a robotically controlled extrusion system with multiple nozzles.

    このロボットは素材の特性を瞬時に変化させ

  • The robot would vary material properties on the fly

    一つの素材から4メートル程の長さの構造を作り出します

  • and create these 12-foot-long structures made of a single material,

    完全にリサイクル可能です

  • 100 percent recyclable.

    パーツが完成すると 乾燥させられ

  • When the parts are ready, they're left to dry

    空気との接触により自然に形づくられてきます

  • and find a form naturally upon contact with air.

    もうプラスチックは必要無くなるでしょう

  • So why are we still designing with plastics?

    印刷過程で生まれる気泡は

  • The air bubbles that were a byproduct of the printing process

    35億年前に地上に初めて登場した 光合成を行う微生物を包み込んでいたものです

  • were used to contain photosynthetic microorganisms

    これは最近になって分かったことです

  • that first appeared on our planet 3.5 billion year ago,

    ハーバードとMITの共同研究者たちと共に

  • as we learned yesterday.

    大気中の炭素を素早く取り込み糖分に変換するように

  • Together with our collaborators at Harvard and MIT,

    遺伝子操作を加えたバクテリアを

  • we embedded bacteria that were genetically engineered

    これに埋め込みました

  • to rapidly capture carbon from the atmosphere

    私たちは初めて

  • and convert it into sugar.

    梁から網目状の部分まで継ぎ目無く

  • For the first time,

    変化し つながる構造を作ることができました

  • we were able to generate structures that would seamlessly transition

    窓のように大きく作ることだってできます

  • from beam to mesh,

    「果実である樹」です

  • and if scaled even larger, to windows.

    地球に最初に現れたような

  • A fruit-bearing fruit tree.

    古来からある材料を用いて

  • Working with an ancient material,

    たくさんの水と 合成生物学の手法で少し手を加えることにより

  • one of the first lifeforms on the planet,

    エビの殻で出来た構造を

  • plenty of water and a little bit of synthetic biology,

    木のような構造に変えることができたのです

  • we were able to transform a structure made of shrimp shells

    そして最も素晴らしいことは

  • into an architecture that behaves like a tree.

    生物分解する物質を デザインできたことです

  • And here's the best part:

    海に入れると海洋生物の栄養になり

  • for objects designed to biodegrade,

    土に戻すと木の栄養となるのです

  • put them in the sea, and they will nourish marine life;

    このデザイン原理を用いた次の冒険の舞台は

  • place them in soil, and they will help grow a tree.

    太陽系でした

  • The setting for our next exploration using the same design principles

    惑星間航海の為の生命維持装置となる 服の開発も考えてみました

  • was the solar system.

    そのためには微生物を蓄え その動きを管理する必要があります

  • We looked for the possibility of creating life-sustaining clothing

    私たちは 元素記号表のような 独自の要素記号表を作りました

  • for interplanetary voyages.

    新たな生命体が 計算通りに成長し

  • To do that, we needed to contain bacteria and be able to control their flow.

    付加的に造られ

  • So like the periodic table, we came up with our own table of the elements:

    生物的に成長していきました

  • new lifeforms that were computationally grown,

    合成生物学は液体の錬金術のようなものだと考えています

  • additively manufactured

    そして貴金属を作り出す代わりに

  • and biologically augmented.

    新たな生物学的機能性を非常に微小な チャネルの中に合成しているのです

  • I like to think of synthetic biology as liquid alchemy,

    これはマイクロ流体技術と呼ばれています

  • only instead of transmuting precious metals,

    私たちはこの流体状の微生物群の流れを コントロールするための

  • you're synthesizing new biological functionality inside very small channels.

    チャネルを3D印刷しました

  • It's called microfluidics.

    最初に作った服では 2つの微生物を組み合わせました

  • We 3D-printed our own channels in order to control the flow

    まずは海や淡水湖に住む藍藻類でした

  • of these liquid bacterial cultures.

    次に人の腸に住む大腸菌です

  • In our first piece of clothing, we combined two microorganisms.

    前者は光を糖分に変え 後者は糖分を消費し

  • The first is cyanobacteria.

    そして環境に優しい生物燃料を生成します

  • It lives in our oceans and in freshwater ponds.

    これら2つの微生物は自然では 決して交わることはありません

  • And the second, E. coli, the bacterium that inhabits the human gut.

    実際 決して出会うことがなかったのです

  • One converts light into sugar, the other consumes that sugar

    それが今初めてこのように作り変えられ

  • and produces biofuels useful for the built environment.

    衣服の中でお互いに関係し合うこととなったのです

  • Now, these two microorganisms never interact in nature.

    自然選択ではなく デザインによって進化を遂げたのだと

  • In fact, they never met each other.

    考えてみてください

  • They've been here, engineered for the first time,

    この関係性を保つために

  • to have a relationship inside a piece of clothing.

    消化器官に似たチャネルを作り

  • Think of it as evolution not by natural selection,

    これらの微生物が行き来し その機能性が 場所に応じて変化しやすいようにしました

  • but evolution by design.

    そして求められる機能性に応じて 素材の性質を変化させ

  • In order to contain these relationships,

    人間の体の表面上で これらのチャンネルを成長させました

  • we've created a single channel that resembles the digestive tract,

    光合成が欲しかった部分には 透明なチャネルを増やしました

  • that will help flow these bacteria and alter their function along the way.

    このウェアラブルな消化器系は 目一杯に広げると

  • We then started growing these channels on the human body,

    60メートルにもなります

  • varying material properties according to the desired functionality.

    これはフットボール競技場の半分の長さで

  • Where we wanted more photosynthesis, we would design more transparent channels.

    私たちの小腸の10倍の長さです

  • This wearable digestive system, when it's stretched end to end,

    そしてここTEDで初めてお目にかけますが

  • spans 60 meters.

    これが最初の光合成するウェアラブル素材で

  • This is half the length of a football field,

    衣服の中で流体を運ぶチャネルが 生命の輝きを放っています

  • and 10 times as long as our small intestines.

    (拍手)

  • And here it is for the first time unveiled at TED --

    ありがとうございます

  • our first photosynthetic wearable,

    小説家メアリー・シェリーは「人間とは 半分だけ仕上がった未完成の生き物たちだ」

  • liquid channels glowing with life inside a wearable clothing.

    と言いましたが もしデザインで残りの半分を補えるとしたら?

  • (Applause)

    生体を増強できるような構造を 創り出せるとしたら?

  • Thank you.

    パーソナライズした微生物群を生み出し

  • Mary Shelley said, "We are unfashioned creatures, but only half made up."

    それが皮膚をスキャンし 損傷した組織を修復し

  • What if design could provide that other half?

    身体を維持することが出来たら?

  • What if we could create structures that would augment living matter?

    例えて言うならバイオテクノロジーの 一種とも言えるでしょう

  • What if we could create personal microbiomes

    「ワンダラーズ」は 惑星から名前をとったコレクションで

  • that would scan our skins, repair damaged tissue

    私にとってはファッションというよりも

  • and sustain our bodies?

    地上そして異星でのわが種族の将来に思いを馳せ

  • Think of this as a form of edited biology.

    科学的洞察でたくさんの謎に取り組み

  • This entire collection, Wanderers, that was named after planets,

    機械の時代を離れ

  • was not to me really about fashion per se,

    私たちの身体、我々が育てる微生物 製品そして建築物までもが

  • but it provided an opportunity to speculate about the future

    共生する新たな時代へと踏み出す

  • of our race on our planet and beyond,

    きっかけを与えてくれました

  • to combine scientific insight with lots of mystery

    私はこれをマテリアル・エコロジーと呼びます

  • and to move away from the age of the machine

    この為には常に自然に立ち戻る必要があります

  • to a new age of symbiosis between our bodies,

    皆さんは3D印刷では材料を幾層にも 重ねて印刷する事をご存知ですね

  • the microorganisms that we inhabit,

    自然ではそれはあり得ないということも

  • our products and even our buildings.

    自然は成長します それは洗練した形で付加して行きます

  • I call this material ecology.

    例えばこの蚕の繭は

  • To do this, we always need to return back to nature.

    とても洗練された構造を作り出し

  • By now, you know that a 3D printer prints material in layers.

    その中で変態を遂げるわけですが

  • You also know that nature doesn't.

    現在の付加製造技術のどれも これ程の洗練に到達していません

  • It grows. It adds with sophistication.

    蚕はそれを2つの素材を使ってするのではなく

  • This silkworm cocoon, for example,

    濃度の違う2種類のタンパク質を使って行います

  • creates a highly sophisticated architecture,

    1つは骨格を作り もう1つは基質 つまり糊のように働き

  • a home inside which to metamorphisize.

    繊維を束ねます

  • No additive manufacturing today gets even close to this level of sophistication.

    これは規模を問わず行われます

  • It does so by combining not two materials,

    蚕はまず周りの環境に従い

  • but two proteins in different concentrations.

    張力を持つ構造を作り出し

  • One acts as the structure, the other is the glue, or the matrix,

    そして圧縮性のある繭を紡ぎだします

  • holding those fibers together.

    緊張と圧縮 生命の2つの力が

  • And this happens across scales.

    1つの素材に現れます

  • The silkworm first attaches itself to the environment --

    この複雑なプロセスの仕組みを理解するために

  • it creates a tensile structure --

    ごく小さな磁石を

  • and it then starts spinning a compressive cocoon.

    蚕の頭にある吐糸管に取り付けました

  • Tension and compression, the two forces of life,

    蚕を磁力センサーとともに箱に入れることで

  • manifested in a single material.

    点からなる3次元的な雲状のイメージを作り出し

  • In order to better understand how this complex process works,

    蚕が作った繭の複雑な構造を視覚化させました

  • we glued a tiny earth magnet

    蚕を箱の中ではなく

  • to the head of a silkworm, to the spinneret.

    平面に置いた時

  • We placed it inside a box with magnetic sensors,

    蚕たちは平らな繭を紡ぎますが

  • and that allowed us to create this 3-dimensional point cloud

    それでも健全に変態していくことに 気づきました