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  • Hello everyone, this is Andrew at Crown Academy of English.

  • Today we are doing a grammar lesson about when to use the word "much" and "many."

  • So we will look at the most common situations of when we use these two words. Not every situation but the most common situations. Alright? So let us start.

  • So let us look at some questions about quantity.

  • How many apples are there?

  • How many eggs are there?

  • And how many bananas are there?

  • So, the first thing we can say is that all of these nouns are countable nouns.

  • A countable noun is a noun that is a separate object that we can count.

  • And it can only exist in the singular or plural. Okay, so it can exist in both. Singular or the plural. Okay?

  • So if we want to ask a question about quantity using countable nouns, then we use the expression "how many?" Ok?

  • And the noun must go in the plural form. And also the verb goes in the plural form.

  • So here we have the noun in the plural with an "s" (apples) and the verb. - This is the verb "to be" and it is the third person plural. Ok?

  • And it is the same here. We have the noun in the plural.

  • We use the expression "how many?" and the verb is in the plural form: "How many eggs are there?"

  • And the same here: "How many bananas are there?"

  • So the rule is - When we use "many", we use "many" in questions about quantity. And it is with countable nouns in the plural. Alright?

  • So we use the expression "how many" with countable nouns in the plural with the verb in the plural as well.

  • And these are all questions.

  • Let's look at some more questions about quantity:

  • How much milk is there?

  • How much cheese is there?

  • and how much sugar is there?

  • Now this time, all of these nouns are uncountable nouns.

  • So we cannot count uncountable nouns. They are not separate objects and they are always in the singular.

  • Notice, they are always in the singular: milk, cheese, sugar.

  • And so when we are using questions about quantity with uncountable nouns, then this time we use the expression "how much?"

  • Alright? We do not say "how many". We say "how much?"

  • And the noun, because it is an uncountable noun, the noun is always in the singular.

  • And the verb is always in the singular. So this is the verb "to be" and this is the third person singular of the verb "to be."

  • "How much milk is there?" And it is a question.

  • And it is the same here: "How much cheese is there?" - "cheese" is singular and the verb is singular.

  • And here is the same: "How much sugar is there?" We say "how much", "sugar" is in the singular and the verb is in the singular.

  • So the rule here is - We use "much" in questions about quantity with uncountable nouns. Alright? Uncountable nouns. So "much" for uncountable nouns.

  • Now let us describe a small quantity.

  • There aren't many carrots.

  • There aren't many pears.

  • And there aren't many strawberries.

  • So again, these are examples of countable nouns.

  • And if you look at each sentence, we can see that they are all negative sentences: "aren't" is the contracted form of "are not"

  • "are not", "There aren't many strawberries." So they are all negative sentences to describe a small quantity.

  • And we use the word "many" in these situations. So we use the word "many".

  • The noun is in the plural. So we put the countable noun in the plural form.

  • And the verb is in the plural form. This is the third person plural of the verb "to be". And it is obviously in the negative form.

  • And it is the same here: "There aren't many pears."

  • "There aren't many strawberries."

  • So the rule here is - We use "many" in negative sentences to describe a small quantity with countable nouns in the plural.

  • Alright? So that is the second ....(excuse me) .. that is the second situation where we use the word "many".

  • So negative sentences to describe a small quantity with countable nouns in the plural.

  • Now let's look at some more small quantities:

  • There isn't much pasta.

  • There isn't much rice.

  • and there isn't much wine.

  • So this time, they are all uncountable nouns. And obviously, as we said before, uncountable nouns are always in the singular.

  • And again, they are all negative sentences.

  • This is the contracted form of "is not" - "isn't", "isn't", "There isn't much wine." All negative sentences.

  • And so, when we are describing a small quantity of an uncountable noun in a negative sentence, then we use the word "much."

  • And since uncountable nouns are always in singular, then the verb is always in the singular: This is the third person singular of the verb "to be."

  • And it is the same here again: "There isn't much rice."

  • And the same here: "There isn't much wine."

  • And so the second situation of when we use the word "much" is:

  • We use "much" in negative sentences to describe a small quantity with uncountable nouns.

  • Alright? So that is the second situation.

  • Now this is slightly different. Now we want to describe a large quantity using a positive sentence.

  • And on the left, we have some oranges and here we have some chocolate.

  • So on the left, this is an example of a countable noun because we can say either "orange" or "oranges". We can count an orange.

  • But on the right, this is an example of an uncountable noun. This is chocolate.

  • So how do we describe a large quantity for a countable noun?

  • Well, this is how we say it: We say "There are a lot of oranges."

  • So this time, we do NOT use "much" or "many". We use an expression: "a lot of"

  • And for countable nouns, then the noun must go in the plural form with the letter "s"

  • And the verb as well. The verb is in the third person plural of the verb "to be"

  • So that is correct.

  • And that is wrong. Alright? So this is an exception. This is an example of a situation when we do NOT use the word "many." Okay?

  • It is not a big mistake. Okay? But in English, we never really say this. Okay?

  • It is slightly correct but it is better to use "a lot of". This is much more common in English to say "a lot of".

  • And for uncountable nouns, it is the same. We use the same expression "a lot of"

  • But since it is an uncountable noun, since uncountable nouns are only singular, (there is no "s" here), then the verb is singular too.

  • This is the third person singular of the verb "to be"

  • That is correct.

  • And that is wrong. So we do not use the word "much" when we are using a positive sentence to describe a large quantity.

  • So this is a mistake in English and we never really say it.

  • But here, this is much more common. This is how most English people would describe a large quantity.

  • So the rule here is that we do not use "many" or "much" in positive sentences to describe a large quantity.

  • We prefer to use the expression "a lot of" Ok?

  • An alternative to "a lot of" is "lots of". So "a lot of" or "lots of" is the same.

  • What is important to remember here is that we do not use "many" and we do not use "much". Ok?

  • So when we use "a lot of" with a countable noun, then do not forget the noun is in the plural with the verb in the plural.

  • And when we use "a lot of" with uncountable nouns, then the noun is in the singular and the verb is in the singular.

  • So, let us do an exercise.

  • Question one: I would like you to ask about the quantity of your favourite fruit. And I want you to give me two...two types of fruit.

  • So my example is "How many apples are there?" - "How many apples are there?". So that is my example. I would like you to give me two other examples.

  • And question two - I would also like you to ask about the quantity of your favourite drink.

  • And I want you to give me two examples. So my example is "How much milk is there?"

  • Okay and question three - I would like you to tell me what food is in small quantity in your cupboard. And I would like you to give me four things.

  • So in your home, I would like you to open your cupboard and to describe a food which is only in small quantity.

  • So my example would be - "There aren't many apples" and "There isn't much rice".

  • So those are two examples of mine and I want you to give me four.

  • And so I would like you to do this exercise in the comment section below the video please.

  • So if you write your answers in the comments below the video,

  • then I will reply to you in the comments and I will tell you if your answers are right or wrong and I will give you the explanation of why.

  • Ok? So that is the end of today's lesson.

  • If you would like to subscribe to my channel, then you can click here on the screen.

  • Here is my Twitter account and here are two other videos which you might be interested in.

  • If you want more information about countable and uncountable nouns, then here is an English grammar lesson which describes it in more detail.

  • And on the right, this is a listening exercise.

  • Okay, so that is the end of the lesson. Thank you very much for watching

  • and my name is Andrew at Crown Academy of English and I'll see you next time. Bye bye!

Hello everyone, this is Andrew at Crown Academy of English.

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B1 中級

多くの」「多くの」を使うタイミング|英文法レッスン (When to use "much" and "many" | English grammar lesson)

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    楊鎧瑄 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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