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  • It's an opportunity like no other.

  • I don't like teacher's pets and I don't like school bullies.

  • What I like is young people that have the potential

  • to succeed in business.

  • From all over the country,

  • Britain's youngest aspiring entrepreneurs have come to London.

  • Has everybody signed onto the fact that this task was about making money?

  • - You're acting like an idiot! You kept shouting over him. - Guys, let it go!

  • - Let it go! - Stop shouting, Amy.

  • Aged 16 and 17, all have a burning passion for business.

  • - Are you going to listen to me? - We're not doing this now.

  • Don't dodge the question. Did you lose control of the task?

  • - Listen for a second. - We did listen! - You're not listening again!

  • They'll battle it out for a prize worth £25,000 -

  • the ultimate kick-start to a career in business.

  • Oh, I'm sweating like a pig at the butcher's!

  • But to succeed, they'll have to impress the boss - Lord Sugar.

  • You tried to be too clever, and I'm afraid that it's backfired.

  • In charge of a vast business empire,

  • Lord Sugar started his career while still at school.

  • Now he's on the hunt for his next Young Apprentice.

  • Bottom line is, you totally went off the rails here.

  • To win, they have to work as a team...

  • - No, no, no. - It's poor management. - It was bad management.

  • ..but shine as individuals...

  • 650, cash in hand now.

  • SHE SHRIEKS

  • ..because, in the end, there can only be one Young Apprentice.

  • With regret, you're fired.

  • You're fired.

  • You're fired.

  • Previously on Young Apprentice...

  • Your task today is to go out

  • and procure items that are going to be used in an opera.

  • Eight hours to find ten props on a list from a London opera house.

  • Can-del-a-brum.

  • I reckon that's a drum.

  • Steven's team started pitch perfect.

  • - £6. Come on. Thank you. - Thank you.

  • Andrew's failed to take direction.

  • - You've only found one job so far. - Yeah, and what have you found?

  • - I've got a number here and I've already called him. - I have an address.

  • You're so immature sometimes.

  • In the boardroom, it was Andrew's team that hit the high note...

  • We've won.

  • ..while David sang for his survival.

  • Every single week, I come back and I fight, and I fight harder.

  • But for Amy, it was curtains.

  • Amy, you're fired.

  • Now just ten remain in the battle to become the Young Apprentice.

  • 6am.

  • PHONE RINGS

  • - Hello. - 'This is Lord Sugar's office.

  • 'He would like you to meet him at the Cutty Sark.

  • - 'The cars will be leaving in 15 minutes.' - OK, thank you.

  • Cutty Sark?

  • - Cutty Sark? Are you sure you're pronouncing it right? - Yeah!

  • - Cutty Sark? - Cutty Sark?

  • What do you think it means?

  • Three tasks completed, and for private tutor David,

  • three times on the losing side.

  • I've had a 100% track record of being in the boardroom, so...

  • I would like to break that mould and this time actually go on a treat.

  • This will be my fourth week, and I've won every week so far.

  • - I just don't want to lose. - Yeah.

  • - We just need to work together as a team. - Yes.

  • - Teamwork will make us win. - Yeah.

  • The Cutty Sark, a major tourist attraction.

  • Based in Greenwich,

  • it's one of the fastest sail-powered trading ships ever built.

  • - Good morning. - ALL: Good morning, Lord Sugar.

  • Well, we're standing under the famous Cutty Sark.

  • This ship was constructed in the 19th century

  • to race tea from China to London in record time.

  • Now, this place has just had a £50 million revamp,

  • and what I want you to do

  • is to revamp the very traditional British afternoon tea.

  • Your task is to create a themed afternoon tea experience

  • and sell it to customers at one of Britain's greatest stately homes.

  • The rules are very simple.

  • The team that makes the most profit will win,

  • and in the losing team, regretfully, one of you will be fired.

  • David, you're going to be project manager of Team Platinum,

  • and, Alice, you're going to be project manager of Team Odyssey.

  • - OK, everything clear? - ALL: Yes, Lord Sugar.

  • Well, good luck, and off you go.

  • Afternoon tea.

  • Pouring back into fashion across the country, cakes, sandwiches

  • and a cuppa can be a nice little earner.

  • But before they can cut themselves a slice of this market,

  • both teams need a teatime theme.

  • OK, then, team, I'm going to kick this off with themes.

  • Down in the hold with her team, project manager Alice.

  • Looking at where we're doing it,

  • I think we should stick with British, and, like, target the tourists.

  • People are in Britain for our heritage, and our history,

  • and 1940s, so I think if we go for a vintage tea party...

  • I don't know. Vintage sort of seems cool to me, but I'm 17.

  • In a stately home, the people that go there, 70% of them are over 35.

  • - Is vintage cool to them? - Do you think people over 35 don't like vintage?

  • - I don't know, cos it's sort of their day, so... - Not over 35, it's not!

  • So, does anyone have any names that are bursting into their head?

  • Well, what's something that's famous for being British?

  • Tea with Elizabeth.

  • Tea with Lizzie! Who was...?

  • 1940, was the Queen the Queen in 1940?

  • Up on deck, taking charge, team captain David.

  • We should give them a twist

  • and something that could possibly excite them.

  • At first, in my mind,

  • - I had the Mad Hatter's tea party idea. - I quite like the idea of the Mad Hatter.

  • So are we going to go for a high-end product, or cheap and fun?

  • I think quality is a key issue, but we need to keep the cost down,

  • cos it is a task that you win on profit.

  • Why don't we go to the cash and carry for the tea

  • - and just the supermarket for the sandwich fillings? - Yeah.

  • The afternoon tea theme seems to be centred around buying

  • quite cheap ingredients for the cake, very cheap tea.

  • People want quality when they go to these stately homes, they want

  • an experience, and I hope the food they're going to buy and make

  • will live up to that experience.

  • With a theme based on the 1940s, next for Alice, plan the research.

  • All right, so what are the main points you want us to ask?

  • You want to know what people think is inherently British.

  • Do you mean food or landmarks or what?

  • Drinks, food, things like that.

  • I really can trust you guys. You've got your heads switched on.

  • Would you like us to find out what our market will be?

  • Yeah, and pricing. I think we can go high-end.

  • As regards to working as a team, I know I don't need to say it,

  • but I want to say, if we work together, we will nail this.

  • 'I think I definitely can take hold of strong personalities.'

  • There have been a few spats the last couple of weeks,

  • but everyone's really keen to get on and just crack on with this task.

  • 10am.

  • Both teams split up - one half to taste some teas,

  • the rest to test the market.

  • Do you mind if I ask you a few quick questions?

  • What I was thinking is, you know bright-coloured food and stuff,

  • is that the kind of thing you would stay clear of

  • or you would like to eat?

  • - Oh, yes, I would like that. - You like bright-coloured food. Is that fine, not a problem? - No problem.

  • OK. Cool. Great.

  • Researching Alice's 1940s theme, Maria, Andrew and Navdeep.

  • What shall we try to achieve from this market research?

  • I think generally we know what to do,

  • but I don't know if Alice really led us in that direction.

  • She told us that she wanted...

  • What questions did she tell us to ask?

  • - I think we know how to ask questions. - Yeah. - We're not four.

  • Hi, guys, can I borrow your time for a second?

  • What would you say is iconically British?

  • The red phone box, the red post-box.

  • Right. So red's quite British. That's lovely.

  • - How much would you expect to pay? - I wouldn't know. - You wouldn't know.

  • - And what sandwich fillings would you be expecting? - I wouldn't be expecting anything.

  • If you were going for a high-class afternoon tea,

  • - what would you be expecting to pay? - £25 each. - £25, nice one.

  • - How much would you expect to pay for a high-class afternoon tea? - I'd expect to pay £30.

  • - What would you expect the price to be? - £5 maximum.

  • Price-wise, what are you thinking?

  • I've got a lot of tens and one 25 and one 30.

  • - Depends on what people are there. - It also depends on what we're actually serving.

  • I think the market research was a bit of a disorganised confusion.

  • We didn't really have clear direction.

  • Well done.

  • For Patrick and Alice, something more civilised...

  • - We're here for afternoon tea. - May I show you to your table? - Of course.

  • ..the way it's done at London's top tables.

  • You get a range of teas, finger sandwiches,

  • and then French pastries and specialist mini cakes.

  • We start our afternoon tea with a lemon elderflower posset