Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • My name is Ryan Nicodemus, and this is Joshua Fields Millburn.

    私はライアン・ニコデモス こちらはジョシュア・フィールズ・ミルバーン

  • And the two of us run a website called the minimalist dot com.

    そして二人でミニマムドットコムというサイトを運営しています。

  • And today were gonna talk to you about what it means to be a part of a community.

    今日はコミュニティの一員であることの意味についてお話しします。

  • But first, we wanna share a story with you about how it became rich.

    しかし、その前に、どのようにして金持ちになったのかという話をしたいと思います。

  • Imagine your life, a year from now. Two years from now. Five years from now.

    今から1年後のあなたの人生を想像してみてください。今から2年後を。今から5年後を。

  • What is it gonna look like? Imagine a life with less.

    どんな風になるのかな?少ない人生を想像してみてください。

  • Less stuff. Less clutter. Less stress in death and discontent.

    物を減らしてごちゃごちゃしたものが減る。死と不満のストレスが減る。

  • A life with fewer distractions. Youre joking right now, right?

    気晴らしの少ない生活。今はふざけていますよね?

  • Dude, were trying to give a talk. Sorry about that.

    おい、俺たちは話をしようとしているんだ。悪かったな

  • Now, imagine a life with more. More time, more meaningful relationships, more growth and contribution.

    今、より多くのものを持つ人生を想像してみてください。より多くの時間、より有意義な人間関係、より多くの成長と貢献を。

  • A life of passion, unencumbered by the trappings and the chaotic world around you.

    あなたの周りにある、罠と混沌とした世界に邪魔されない、情熱の人生。

  • What youre imagining is an intentional life. It’s not a perfect life.

    あなたがイメージしているのは、意図的な人生です。完璧な人生ではありません。

  • It’s not even an easy life. But a simple one.

    楽な人生ですらないしかし、簡単なものだ。

  • What youre imagining is a rich life. The kind of rich that has nothing to do with wealth.

    あなたが想像しているのは、豊かな生活です。豊かさとは何の関係もないお金持ちのことです。

  • You know…I used to think rich was earning fifty thousand dollars a year.

    金持ちは年収5万ドルだと思っていたが。

  • Then when I started climbing the corporate ladder in my twenties. I quickly begin turning fifty grand but I didn’t feel rich.

    そして、20代で会社の出世を始めた時。あっという間に5万円になり始めましたが、お金持ちとは思えませんでした。

  • So I tried to adjust for inflation. May be seventy five thousand dollars a year was rich.

    インフレに合わせて調整してみた年に7万5千ドルが金持ちだったかもしれない。

  • Maybe ninety thousand. Maybe six figures. Or maybe owning a bunch of stuff. Maybe that was rich.

    たぶん9万6桁かもしれないそれか、たくさんの物を所有しているかもしれない。金持ちだったのかもしれない

  • Wellwhatever rich was. I knew that once I got there, I would finally be happy.

    まあ...どんな金持ちでも。そこにたどり着いたら、やっと幸せになれると思っていました。

  • So as I made more money, I spent more money all in the pursuit of the American dream.

    だから、お金を稼ぐと同時に、アメリカンドリームの追求にすべてのお金を使ってしまったのです。

  • All in the pursuit of happiness. But the closer I got, the farther way the happiness was.

    すべては幸せの追求のためにしかし、近づけば近づくほど、幸せは遠のいていった。

  • Five years ago, my entire life was different from what it is today. Radically different.

    5年前、私の人生は今とは違っていました。根本的に違う

  • I had everything I ever wanted. I had everything I supposed to have. I had an impressive job title with respectable corporation.

    欲しいものは全て持っていた欲しいと思っていたものはすべて持っていました。尊敬できる企業との印象的な肩書きを持っていました。

  • A successful career managing hundreds of employees. I earned the six figure income.

    数百人の従業員を管理する成功したキャリア。6桁の収入を得ました。

  • I bought a fancy new car every couple years. I own a huge three bedroom condo, it even had two living rooms.

    数年ごとに派手な新車を買っていた。巨大な3ベッドルームのコンドミニアムを所有していて、リビングルームも2つあった。

  • I have no idea why single guy needs two living rooms.

    独身の男がリビングを2つ必要とする理由がわからない。

  • I was living the American dream. Everyone around me said I was successful.

    私はアメリカンドリームを生きていました。周りの誰もが私が成功していると言っていました。

  • But I was only a sensibly successful. You see I also had a bunch of things that were hard to see

    しかし、私は感覚的に成功しただけでした。見ての通り、私には見えにくいこともたくさんありました。

  • From the outside. Even though I earned a lot of money. I had heaps and debt.

    外側から見ても稼いでいても莫大な借金を抱えていました。

  • But chasing the American dream. It cost me a lot more than money.

    でもアメリカンドリームを追いかけてお金以上のものがかかってしまった。

  • My life was filled with stress and anxiety and discontent.

    私の人生は、ストレスと不安と不満でいっぱいでした。

  • I was miserable. I may have looked successful but I certainly didn’t feel successful.

    私は惨めだった。成功しているように見えたかもしれませんが、確かに成功しているとは感じませんでした。

  • And it got to a point my life where I don’t know what’s important anymore.

    何が大事なのかわからなくなってしまった。

  • But one thing was clear, there was this gaping void in my life. So I tried to fill that void the same way many people do with stuff.

    でも一つだけはっきりしていたのは、私の人生には空洞があったということです。だから、多くの人が物を扱うのと同じように、その空隙を埋めようとしました。

  • Lots of stuff. I was filling the void with consumer purchases. Bought

    たくさんのものを消費者の購入で穴埋めをしていました。買ったのは

  • New cars and electronics and closets for an expensive clothes.

    新車や電化製品、高価な洋服のクローゼット。

  • I bought furniture and expensive home decorations. And I was make sure that all are the latest gadgets.

    私は家具や高価な家の装飾品を購入しました。そして、私はすべてが最新のガジェットであることを確認していました。

  • I owe enough cash the bank. I paid for expensive meals rounds of drinks and frivolous vacations with credit cards.

    私は銀行に十分な現金を借りています。高価な食事のラウンドや軽薄な旅行の代金をクレジットカードで支払っていました。

  • I was spending money faster then I earned it. Attempting to buy my way to happiness, and I thought I get there one day eventually.

    稼ぐよりも早くお金を使っていました。幸せへの道を買おうとしていました いつかはそこにたどり着くと思っていました

  • I mean happiness had to be somewhere just around the corner, right?

    つまり、幸せはすぐそこにあるはずなんだよね?

  • But the stuff didn’t fill the void. Why it didn’t?

    でも、あの薬は空洞を埋めてくれなかった。どうして?

  • And because I didn’t know what was important. I continue to fill the void with stuff going further into debt.

    そして、何が大切なのかわからなかったからこそ私はさらに借金をすることで 空虚を埋め続けています。

  • Working hard to buy things that won’t making me happy. This went on for years.

    自分を幸せにしてくれないものを一生懸命買う。これが何年も続きました。

  • A terrible cycle lather rinse repeat.

    酷いサイクルの泡立てリンスの繰り返し。

  • By my late twenties, my life from the outside looked great.

    20代後半になると、外から見た私の生活は素晴らしいものに見えてきました。

  • But on the inside, I was a wreck. I was several years divorced. I was unhealthy. I was stuck.

    でも、内面はボロボロだった。離婚して数年。私は不健康だった。行き詰まっていた

  • I drink a lot. I did drugs a lot. I uses many pacifiers as I could.

    私はよく飲みます。ドラッグをよくやった。できるだけ多くのおしゃぶりを使っています。

  • And I continue to work 60-70 sometimes 80 hours a week.

    そして、私は週に60~70時間、時には80時間の仕事を続けています。

  • And I first look some of the most important aspects of my life. I barely ever thought about my health.

    そして、私は最初に私の人生で最も重要な側面のいくつかを見てみましょう。私は自分の健康についてほとんど考えたことがありませんでした。

  • My relationships. My passions. And worst of all, I felt stagnant.

    私の人間関係私の情熱そして最悪なのは 停滞を感じたことです

  • I certainly wasn’t contributing to others and I wasn’t growing.

    確かに私は人に貢献していなかったし、成長もしていませんでした。

  • My life lacked meaning, purpose, passion. If you would have asked me what I was passionate about.

    私の人生には意味も目的も情熱もなかった何に情熱を持っているのかと聞かれたら

  • I would look to you like a deer in headlights. What was my passionate about?

    ヘッドライトに照らされた鹿のようにあなたを見ていたい。私は何に熱中していたのでしょうか?

  • I had no idea. I was living paycheck to paycheck. Living for paycheck. Living for stuff. Living for career that I didn’t love.

    全然知らなかった。給料のために生活していた給料のために生きている。物のために生きていた好きでもない仕事のために生きていた

  • But I wasn’t really living at all. I was depressed.

    でも、本当は全然生きていなかったんです。落ち込んでいました。

  • Then, as I was approaching my thirties, I noticed something different about my best friend of twenty-something years.

    そして、30代に近づいてきた頃、20代の親友の異変に気がついた。

  • Josh seems happy for the first time in a really long time that I truly happy. Estatic.

    ジョシュは本当に久しぶりに幸せそうで、私が本当に幸せだと思った。エスタティック。

  • But I didn’t understand why. We worked side by side in the same corporation through out the twenties both climbing the ranks.

    でも 私には理解できませんでした私たちは同じ会社で 並んで働いていました 20代の間ずっと出世していました

  • And he has been just as miserable as me.

    そして、彼も私と同じように惨めな思いをしてきました。

  • Something had to change to boot. He has just come through to the most difficult events of his life.

    何かを変えなければならなかった彼は人生で最も困難な出来事を経験したところです。

  • His mother just passed away. And his marriage ended both in the same month.

    彼の母親が亡くなったばかり。そして彼の結婚も同じ月に終わった。

  • He wasn’t supposed to be happy. He certainly wasn’t supposed to be happier than me.

    彼は幸せになるはずじゃなかった彼は確かに私よりも幸せになるはずがなかった。

  • So I did what any best friend would do. I took Josh out to lunch. I sat him down.

    親友がするようなことをしたのジョシュをランチに連れ出して彼を座らせたの

  • And I asked him a question. Why the hell are you so happy?

    そして、私は彼に質問をした。なんでそんなに幸せなんだ?

  • He spent the next 20 minutes telling me about something called minimalism.

    彼は次の20分でミニマリズムと呼ばれるものについて話してくれました。

  • He talked about how he spent the last few months simplifying his life.

    最後の数ヶ月間、自分の人生をシンプルにするためにどのように過ごしていたかを語ってくれました。

  • Getting the clutter out of the way, to make room for what was truly important.

    本当に重要なもののための場所を確保するために 散らかっていたものを片付けています。

  • And then he introduced me to an entire community of people who had done the same thing.

    そして、彼は私に同じことをした人たちのコミュニティを紹介してくれた。

  • He introduced me to a guy named Colin White a 24 year-old entrepreneur who travels to a new country every four months.

    彼は私にコリン・ホワイトという男を紹介してくれました。彼は24歳の起業家で、4ヶ月ごとに新しい国を旅しています。

  • Carrying with everything that he owned.

    彼が所有していたすべてのものを持ち歩いている。

  • Then there was Joshua Backer, a 36 year-old husband and father of two with a full time job and a car and a house in suburban Vermont.

    36歳の夫で二児の父、フルタイムの仕事と車と家を持ち、バーモント州の郊外に住んでいるジョシュア・バッカーがいました。

  • And then he show me Corney Carbor, a 40 year-old wife and mother to a teenage daughter in Salt Lake City.

    そして、40歳の妻で10代の娘の母親でもあるコーニー・カーバーを見せてくれました。

  • And there was leave about a 38 year-old husband and father of six in San Francisco.

    サンフランシスコの38歳の夫と6人の父親の話がありました。

  • Although, all these people were living considerably different lives.

    とはいえ、この人たちはみんなかなり違った生活をしていた。

  • People from different backgrounds with children and families in different work situations.

    さまざまな背景を持つ人たちが、さまざまな仕事の場面で子どもや家族を抱えている。

  • They all share at least two things in common.

    彼らには少なくとも2つの共通点があります。

  • First, they were living deliberate meaningful lives.

    まず、意図的に意味のある生活をしていた。

  • They were passionate and purpose driven. They seemed much richer than any other so-called rich as I worked with in the corporate room.

    彼らは情熱的で目的意識が強かった。私が会社の部屋で一緒に仕事をしていたように、彼らは他のいわゆるお金持ちよりもずっと金持ちに見えました。

  • And second, they attributed their meaningful lives to the things called minimalism.

    そして第二に、彼らはミニマリズムと呼ばれるものに意味のある人生を帰属させた。

  • So me being the problem solving guy and I am.

    問題を解決するのが得意な私と、そうでない私。

  • I decided to become a minimalist right there on the spot.

    その場でミニマリストになることを決意しました。

  • I looked up at Josh. I excitedly declaredalright man, I’m gonna do. I’m in.

    私はジョシュを見上げた。私は興奮して宣言しました...よし、やるぞ。俺の出番だ。

  • I’m gonna be a minimalist. Now what?

    ミニマリストになるさて、どうする?

  • You see…I don’t wanna spend months spear down my items like he had that was great for him.

    あのね...私は彼が持っていたようなアイテムを何ヶ月もかけて槍で削るのは嫌なの。

  • But I wanted faster results. So we came up with this idea of a packing party.

    でも、もっと早く結果を出したいと思っていました。そこで思いついたのがパッキングパーティーです。

  • We decided to pack all my belongings as if were moving.

    引越しのつもりで荷物をまとめていくことにしました。

  • And then I would unpack only the items I needed over the next three weeks.

    そして、3週間かけて必要なものだけを開梱していきます。

  • Josh literally helped me box up everything. My clothes, y kitchen ware, my towels, my TV’s, my electronics.

    ジョシュが全ての箱詰めを 手伝ってくれた洋服、キッチン用品、タオル、テレビ、電子機器。

  • My framed photographs and paintings, my toiletries, even my furniture. Everything.

    私の額装した写真や絵画、洗面用具、家具まで。すべてだ

  • After nine hours and a couple pizza deliveries, everything was packed.

    9時間後にはピザの配達もあり、全てが満員になっていました。

  • So there Josh and I were, sitting in my second living room feeling exhausted.

    ジョシュと私は2番目のリビングルームに座っていて、疲れを感じていました。

  • Staring at boxes stacked halfway to my 12-foot ceilings. My condo was empty and everything’s my cardboard, everything I own.

    12フィートの天井まで半分ずつ積み上げられた箱を見つめていた私のコンドミニアムは空っぽで、全てが私のダンボールで、私が所有している全てのものです。

  • Every single thing I’ve worked hard for over the last decade was sitting there in that room.

    この10年で頑張ってきたことが、すべてあの部屋に座っていた。

  • Just boxes, stacked on top of boxes, stacked on top of boxes. Now each box was labeled.

    ただの箱、箱の上に積み上げられた箱、箱の上に積み上げられた箱。今ではそれぞれの箱にラベルが貼られていました。

  • So I know where to go when they needed a particular item labels like living room, junk drawer number one, kitchenware, bedroom closet, junk drawer number nine.

    だから、彼らはリビングルーム、ジャンク引き出し番号1、キッチン用品、寝室のクローゼット、ジャンク引き出し番号9のような特定の項目のラベルを必要としたときにどこに行けばいいかを知っています。

  • So forth and so on, I spent the next 21 days unpacking only the items I needed.

    などなど、必要なものだけを開梱して21日間を過ごしました。

  • My toothbrush, my bed and bed sheets. The furniture I actually use. Some kitchenware, a toolset just the things that I value to my life.

    私が実際に使っている歯ブラシやベッド、ベッドシーツ。実際に使っている家具。台所用品や道具一式 私の生活に大切にしているものです

  • After three weeks, 80 percent of my stuff was still sitting in those boxes, just sitting there on accessed.

    3週間後には、私の荷物の80%はまだ箱に入ったままで、ただアクセスしただけでそこに座っていました。

  • All those things, that were supposed to make me happy, they weren’t doing their job.

    私を幸せにしてくれるはずのものが、仕事をしていなかった。

  • So I decided to donate and sell all of it. And you know what?

    ということで、全部寄付して売ることにしました。そしたら、何を知っているかというと

  • I started to feel rich for the first time. I started to feel rich once I got everything out of the way.

    すべてを片付けたら、初めてリッチな気分になりました。すべてのことを片付けてから豊かさを感じるようになりました。

  • And made room for everything that remains.

    残ったもののためのスペースを作った

  • A month later, my entire perspective has changed.

    1ヶ月後、私の全体の見方が変わりました。

  • And I thought to myself maybe some people might find value in my story and our story.

    私の話や私たちの話に価値を見出す人がいるかもしれないと思ったんです。

  • So Ryan and I did…I guess anyone would do. we started a blog.

    ライアンと私は...誰でもそうだと思いますが、ブログを始めました。

  • We call it the minimalists. That was three years ago.

    ミニマリストと呼んでいます。3年前の話だ

  • And something amazing happened. 52 people visit our website in the first month.

    そして、驚くべきことが起こりました。最初の1ヶ月で52人の方がホームページを訪問してくれました。

  • 52! I realize that might sound unremarkable at first.

    52!最初は地味に聞こえるかもしれませんが

  • But then in our story was resonating with dozens people .

    しかし、その後、私たちの物語の中で何十人もの人々と共鳴していた。

  • And then other amazing things started happening. 52 readers turned into 500.

    そして、他にも驚くようなことが起こり始めました。52人の読者が500人になったのです。

  • 500 became 5000. And now more than 2 million people a year read our words.

    500人が5000人になりました。そして今では年間200万人以上の人が私たちの言葉を読んでくれています。

  • It turns out that when you add values to people’s lives, theyre pretty eager to share the message with

    人々の生活に価値観を加えると、彼らはかなり熱心にメッセージを共有したがることがわかりました。

  • Their friends and their family and add value to their lives.

    彼らの友人や家族が、彼らの人生に付加価値を与えてくれる。

  • Adding values, it’s a basic human instinct. In fact that’s why were here today.

    価値観を加えること、それは人間の基本的な本能です。実はそのために今の私たちがあるのです。

  • A couple years ago, Ryan and I moved from Ohio to Montana.

    数年前、ライアンと私はオハイオ州からモンタナ州に引っ越しました。

  • And what we discovered here was an entire of people. People who weren’t traditionally wealthy.

    ここで発見したのは、人々の全体です。伝統的に裕福ではなかった人々です

  • But who were rich in a different way. We discovered so many people who were willing to contribute beyond themselves.

    しかし、違う意味でお金持ちだった人たち。自分を超えて貢献しようとする多くの人々を発見しました

  • And that’s what makes a real community, contribution.

    そして、それが本当のコミュニティ、貢献になるのです。

  • And so we’d like to encourage everyone to take a look at your day-to-day lives.

    ということで、皆さんの日々の生活を見ていただきたいと思います。

  • Take a look at whatever eats up the majority of your time.

    あなたの時間の大半を占めるものは何でも見てみましょう。

  • Is it checking email or Facebook? Or watching TV?

    メールやフェイスブックのチェックですか?それともテレビを見ていますか?

  • Is it shopping online? Or at retail stores?

    ネットショッピングなのか?それとも小売店?

  • Is working hard for a paycheck to buy stuff you don’t need, things that will make you happy?

    給料のために一生懸命働いて、いらないものを買って幸せになるのか?

  • Now, it’s not that we think that there’s anything inherently wrong with material possessions.

    物質的な所有物には本質的に何か悪いことがあると考えているわけではありません。

  • Or working a 9 to 5. There’s not. We all need some stuff.

    9時から5時まで働くこともないわ誰にでも必要なものがある

  • We all have to pay the bills, right? It’s just that when we put those things first.

    みんなお金を払わないといけないんだよね?それを第一に考えた時に

  • We tend to lose sight of our real priorities.

    本当の優先順位を見失いがちです。

  • We lose sight of life’s purpose. And so maybe getting some of the excess stuff out of the way.

    人生の目的を見失ってしまいます。そうして余計なものを 排除していくのかもしれません

  • Clearing the clutter from our lives can help us all focus onwelleverything that remains.

    私たちの生活から乱雑さをクリアすることで、私たちはすべてに焦点を当てることができます...よく...残っているすべてのもの。

  • Things like health, relationships, growth, contribution, community.

    健康、人間関係、成長、貢献、コミュニティのようなもの。

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

My name is Ryan Nicodemus, and this is Joshua Fields Millburn.

私はライアン・ニコデモス こちらはジョシュア・フィールズ・ミルバーン

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 金持ち 人生 幸せ ジョシュ 生活 リビング

TEDx】物の少ない豊かな生活|ミニマリスト|TEDxWhitefish

  • 10928 1205
    Go Tutor に公開 2015 年 01 月 12 日
動画の中の単語