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  • Hello :-)

  • .. and welcome to the tutorial:

  • "Translating with OmegaT"

  • "The Basics"

  • First things first:

  • OmegaT is a free and open CAT-tool.

  • ... and CAT stands for: Computer Assisted Translation

  • This means that OmegaT can *not* translate any word by itself,

  • but it does a great job supporting *you*.

  • Here are the steps for this tutorial:

  • First we are going to prepare a source document.

  • Then we switch over to OmegaT

  • and create an empty project....

  • where we import the source-document into.

  • Then we tweak the project a little bit,

  • just to make life easier (later on).

  • And finally we are able to translate the text.

  • And this gonna happen segment by segment.

  • (but we will use some time-jumping technique)

  • In the final step we will export the translated segments

  • into the target document.

  • And the resulting document should look a lot like the original document.

  • ... apart from the translations of course :-)

  • So, this is the sourcetext-file here.

  • Unfortunately it is in a strange closed-source format,

  • which OmegaT can not process.

  • Luckily, both LibreOffice and OpenOffice

  • can import that format with good results.

  • And that is how it looks like.

  • As I fancy aircrafts, this tutorial's content is a P-51,

  • which can be seen here on the right side.

  • This document itself was created just for this tutorial,

  • but most of the text and all those pictures

  • were taken directly from Wikipedia.

  • As one can see, we have headings here,

  • and the text contains bold

  • and now ...

  • also italic text.

  • Here is a list with a few items,

  • and also a small table.

  • All of those layout-changes have no special meanings,

  • they were just created to demonstrate

  • a half-way complex and slightly technical text-document.

  • Now let us save it in a format that OmegaT can read.

  • My choice here is the OpenOffice text-document (ODT).

  • We'll save it ... done.

  • And we can quit the program.

  • Here you can see now

  • the original file and the OpenOffice-file.

  • Which will be opened now in OmegaT! ^_^

  • Now lets take a look at OmegaT.

  • Since each Operating System has a different install-procedure,

  • I will not cover the installation in this tutorial.

  • (Sorry for that and good luck - but really,

  • it is not that difficult :-) )

  • However,

  • once you installed the software and started it up for the first time,

  • you will see this screen.

  • It is the unaltered Welcome-Screen of OmegaT,

  • providing some guide here on the left side.

  • However, nothing was loaded yet, and no text was entered,

  • so we can not translate yet.

  • On the left side is the main-window where all the translation will take place,

  • while on the right side there are the helpers

  • and tools which will support you.

  • But before we can do anything useful here, we will need some source text.

  • So let us create a project and import the source document.

  • So let us create the new project.

  • First you will see a lot of options,

  • but the most important ones are the source language (English)

  • and the target language (German).

  • For now I will un-check the "enable sentence level segmenting"

  • I like the paragraph-segmenting better,

  • but please try it out.

  • All the details below we leave untouched,

  • and now we have an empty project.

  • It is nothing in there, so we import.

  • source file:

  • and as said before - OmegaT can read OpenOffice-Documents.

  • So let us pick this one.

  • And "et voilà" - here we go.

  • As you can see, there is no layout or anything,

  • we don't need to take care of the layout.

  • It is just plain text translating.

  • Interesting though, OmegaT divided our text into 16 segments,

  • which are paragraphs or sentences.

  • Okay, I can jump to any segment by double-clicking it.

  • Now segment number three,

  • here number five,

  • I will translate it.

  • And you can see here the original source-language text disappeared

  • and was replaced by my translation.

  • A helper

  • - which you should use *always* -

  • is the "mark untranslated segments",

  • it will color any text blue, which was not translated yet.

  • This is a great helper, you should be sure to have no blue text

  • before finishing the project.

  • But enough of that.

  • Let us save it and lets quit.

  • Back at the filesystem-level you will recognize

  • a newly created directory,

  • besides the original text-document [DOC] and the converted [ODT].

  • So, within this directory

  • we will have the source folder

  • and here you can find the original text which was imported

  • and the target folder, which is still empty.

  • The glossary folder is quite useful,

  • and I am going to drop some files here,

  • which will help us later in the translation.

  • So this folder contains everything that belongs to the project,

  • even the imported document.

  • So you can compress (zip) it and send it over to

  • a friend or colleague,

  • and [s]he can work on your project.

  • Back in OmegaT we now reopen our formerly saved P-51 Demo

  • project, and you can see: it still has 16 segments

  • and one segment was translated already.

  • That is also not blue anymore,

  • this one here.

  • In order to make it more readable,

  • we will increase the font-size to 24

  • And ... I also like to have the translation tips here,

  • those are markers, which come in handy,

  • as soon as some glossary item was detected by OmegaT.

  • ... as here!!

  • It is marked with a blue underlining,

  • and the glossary-entry ...

  • is visible in the lower right.

  • Here.

  • So.

  • And you will also notice the markers here.

  • They look a little bit like HTML-tags,

  • When I said that you don't need to take care of any layout

  • I lied.

  • Because

  • this is the way OmegaT handles the stuff

  • when it comes to the layout.

  • You don't need to take care of tables or stuff like that,

  • but as long as it's formation was in the text,

  • you have to use those tags.

  • You don't need to know what exactly they are,

  • whether bold or italic,

  • because OmegaT tracks them.

  • So you just need to reuse them around the same piece of text

  • as in the source and everything else will be fine

  • in the final target document.

  • Okay,

  • so basically thats it.

  • And with that you can work, you can start translating

  • and ....

  • don't forget to save often,

  • but OmegaT autosaves.

  • While I continue to translate here,

  • you will do the time-jump. :)

  • Welcome back!

  • I'm almost done here.

  • Now let's take a look at the project.

  • I will decrease the font size to get a better view.

  • And you will notice here the blue marker,

  • showing us that there is still some original text

  • on no German translation available.

  • We will ignore this for now,

  • but as you will see when we create

  • the translated documents we receive no warning.

  • So again, please use this one here

  • to immediately detect any untranslated segments.

  • But for now we created the translated document.

  • So let us quit here,

  • and jump into the project folder.

  • The "target" directory is the place to go now.

  • And, et voilà -

  • there is a OpenOffice document.

  • And, as you can see,

  • the layout is almost the same.

  • We have the picture here on the right.

  • We have headings, we have the some bold text,

  • we have the italic number here,

  • the list and the table.

  • In the middle we have some English text.

  • This is the only piece of text

  • ... the spell-checker is not going crazy about.

  • But nevertheless it is really impressive,

  • and I liked to work with OmegaT because of that.

  • And I hope you enjoy it too, and you like it too.

Hello :-)

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OmegaTでの翻訳 - 基礎 (Translating with OmegaT - The Basics)

  • 44 6
    rain に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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