Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I'm Margot Politis.

  • Intonation is a feature of pronunciation, one of the assessment criteria in the IELTS

  • Speaking Test. You will need to use appropriate intonation in the test. You also need to understand

  • the intonation used by the interviewer.

  • Intonation is important in spoken English because it conveys meaning in many ways. Changing

  • the pitch in your voice - making it higher or lower - allows you

  • to show surprise: "Oh, really!" or boredom: "Oh, really".

  • Let's listen to some intonation patterns used for specific functions.

  • First there's the high or rising tone, used for asking a yes/no question:

  • Do you find English difficult?

  • Are you listening?

  • Is this clear?

  • The rising tone is also used for showing expectation as you can hear when this furniture maker

  • talks about seeing the inside of some rare timber:

  • And I go down and it is really a fascinating day when I actually see a log being put on

  • the head rig and that first cut and I can't wait to have a look at that grain that's actually

  • opened up after a tree has been growing for 300 or 400 years.

  • And it's used for showing interest and excitement.

  • That's awesome. Absolutely awesome.

  • A low or falling tone is used for making a statement as does this art gallery director:

  • The Art Gallery of South Australia commenced the joint program in art history with the

  • University of Adelaide in 2001.

  • Questions with who, what, when, why and how also use this low or falling tone:

  • Who are you looking for?

  • What is that you're reading?

  • Where is the art gallery?

  • Why are you learning English?

  • How are you? Listen to the rising and falling tones used

  • by the woman in the next clip to explain the properties of granular materials:

  • Take vacuum packed coffee for example. This is very much solid like behaviour because

  • it's stiff, stiff as a brick and at the same time it's strong enough to hold your weight.

  • And yet, if we open the pack, I can pour it just like I would pour water.

  • When listing things a rise-falling tone is used:

  • Granular materials constitute a wide range of everyday common materials, such as powders

  • through to natural grains such as nuts, rice, wheat grains and mineral resources.

  • A level tone or a low rising tone can also be used for listing:

  • We have 3 studio cabins, 2 two bedroom cabins, 2 tepees and a campground.

  • Finally, a fall-rising tone expresses uncertainty:

  • Well, I'm not sure what all this means

  • Now we'll look at some sample IELTS interviews. Listen carefully for the intonation patterns.

  • Where else have you travelled?

  • I've travelled to other Asian countries such as Malaysia, Thailand and Singapore and of

  • course I've travelled around in my own country.

  • Where would you most like to go?

  • I would like very much to go to Europe, for example UK, Spain or Netherlands, but I also

  • want to go to Dubai and India.

  • The two questions the interviewer asks are 'wh-' type questions starting with 'where'.

  • Did you notice that the pitch of his voice fell at the end of both questions? Like this:

  • Where else have you travelled?

  • Where would you most like to go?

  • In the answer, notice how the countries are listed using a level tone that then falls

  • for the last item in the list 'in my own country'.

  • I've travelled to other Asian countries such as Malaysia, Thailand and Singapore and of

  • course I've travelled around in my own country.

  • In response to the second question her voice rises to show expectation. She then lists

  • the countries with her voice pitch rising until she ends with a level voice for Dubai.

  • She uses a rising intonation to express the afterthought India. Listen:

  • I would like very much to go to Europe, for example UK, Spain or Netherlands, but I also

  • want to go to Dubai and India.

  • Now listen for whether the voices rise and fall in this part of the test:

  • Could you live without your favourite thing?

  • No, I cannot live without my mobile phone. I have to bring it everywhere because I will

  • feel lost if I don't have it near me.

  • Do people have too many possessions?

  • Yes, I think they do. They tend to buy a lot of things that they don't really need at that

  • time.

  • The two questions the interviewer asks are yes/no type questions. Rising intonation patterns

  • are used for these questions. Did you notice the pitch of his voice rise at the end of

  • the questions? Like this:

  • Could you live without your favourite thing?

  • Do people have too many possessions?

  • In response to the first question, the answer is definite and this certainty is expressed

  • with a flat or level tone:

  • No, I cannot live without my mobile phone.

  • But in response to the second question about whether people have too many possessions,

  • she isn't quite sure and responds with:

  • Yes, I think they do.

  • She uses a fall-rising tone appropriately to indicate that she doesn't really know or

  • is unsure.

  • Yes, I think they do.

  • You are allowed to ask the interviewer what something means in the discussion part or

  • Part 3 of the Speaking Test. It's called asking for clarification. Let's say you didn't know

  • what was meant by 'valued possessions'. You could say:

  • What do you mean by 'valued possessions'?

  • This is a 'wh' question, so it needs a falling tone. Listen again:

  • What do you mean by 'valued possessions'?

  • A different intonation is required for the next way of asking for clarification:

  • Do you mean important things that I own?

  • It's a yes/no question with a rising tone. Listen:

  • Do you mean important things that I own?

  • The final example is a statement, so a falling tone is used:

  • Sorry, I'm not quire sure what you mean by 'valued possessions'.

  • So a falling tone is used for 'wh-' and 'how' questions:

  • Who are you looking for?

  • What is that you're reading?

  • Where is the art gallery?

  • Why are you learning English?

  • How are you?

  • But a rising tone is used for yes/no questions:

  • Do you find English difficult?

  • Are you listening?

  • Is this clear?

  • That's all for now. To find more information about the intonation patterns in English,

  • visit our Study English website. The address is: australianetwork.com/studyenglish.

  • Good luck with your studies. Bye for now.

Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I'm Margot Politis.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

A2 初級

スタディイングリッシュ - シリーズ3 第12話:イントネーション (Study English - Series 3, Episode 12: Intonation)

  • 71 19
    thomas に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語