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  • Hello. This is 6 Minute

  • English from BBC

  • Learning English. I'm Phil and I'm Georgie.

  • We all know how important exercise is to stay fit

  • and reduce the risk of heart disease.

  • Do you exercise much, Phil?

  • I try to.

  • I ride my bike at the weekend,

  • but to be honest, I do spend a lot of time sitting down.

  • Sitting too much is becoming an increasing problem in the modern world.

  • Maybe you take the bus or train to work,

  • then sit at a desk all day, then go home feeling tired and

  • just sit in front of the television all evening as well. Added together,

  • that's hours of sitting every single day.

  • In this programme, we'll be finding out exactly how much sitting is too much

  • and of course, we'll be learning some useful new vocabulary.

  • But first, are you sitting comfortably, Phil?

  • Because I have a question for you. On average, how many hours a day

  • do British adults spend sitting down?

  • Is it a) seven hours b) nine hours or c) twelve hours?

  • I'll guess it's seven hours.

  • OK, Phil, I'll reveal the correct answer later.

  • Charlotte Edwardson is a professor of health and behaviour studies,

  • who has investigated the link between sitting and health problems

  • in her lab at Leicester University.

  • Here she talks to BBC

  • Radio Four programme 'Inside Health'.

  • If we think about our daily activities,

  • a lot of activities are done sitting down. Movement in our everyday lives

  • has really been engineered out with advances in technology

  • and our bodies just weren't designed to sit this much

  • so it's going to cause problems with our health.

  • So when you sit down,

  • you're not using the largest muscles in your body.

  • So, these are the ones in your legs and your bum.

  • So, that means that your muscle activity goes down.

  • When your muscle activity goes down, your blood circulation reduces.

  • Throughout history, humans have always walked and moved their bodies.

  • Now, modern technologies like motorised vehicles

  • and office jobs means we spend more and more time sitting. Modern life

  • has engineered out the need for us to move. When you engineer something out,

  • you design things in such a way that it is no longer required, for example

  • CD drives have been engineered out of laptops because downloads are

  • more popular. Charlotte says humans are not used

  • to sitting this much. Here,

  • the words 'this much' mean 'in such large amounts'.

  • It's a negative thing. One negative

  • being the harm to blood circulation, the flow of blood

  • through the heart and blood vessels, which carries oxygen around the body.

  • When we sit,

  • we stop using important muscles.

  • This reduces blood circulation and causes a range of other effects

  • like increased levels of glucose and fat and decreased energy levels.

  • The body uses 20% more energy when simply standing

  • than when sitting down and walking uses 92% more energy

  • and that's not to mention the damage sitting too much causes

  • to muscle movement and blood pressure.

  • But the hard truth is that sitting is a big part of modern life.

  • Everything is geared around sitting.

  • It's organised towards that particular activity and that makes it hard to stop.

  • Here's Professor Edwardson again, talking

  • with James Gallagher, presenter of BBC

  • Radio Four programme 'Inside Health'.

  • How much do you feel like you're just swimming against the tide

  • with all of this? Like the whole of society is like driving us more

  • and more towards, you know, sitting down all the time and you're like:

  • 'please don't'.

  • Sitting is so much part of our everyday activities.

  • You know, you go into a meeting, someone's "come and take a seat".

  • You go in to your GP surgery -

  • "come and take a seat". Everything's geared around

  • sitting. As technology advances and it tries to make our life easier, it

  • then leads to us sitting even more.

  • James asks if Charlotte is swimming against the tide of modern life.

  • If you're swimming against the tide,

  • you're doing the opposite of what most people are doing.

  • He also says that society is driving us towards sitting more. To drive someone

  • towards something means pushing them to accept a new situation.

  • Even when the situation isn't so good.

  • Luckily, there's some simple advice to help. Break up periods of sitting

  • 30 minutes or more with a few minutes of walking or moving your arms.

  • Also, try to spend less than half of your waking hours sitting down.

  • Good to know. Now, about your question, Georgie.

  • Right, my question was

  • how long does the average British adult spend sitting each day?

  • Phil guessed it was seven hours, which was close,

  • but not right. I'm afraid.

  • In fact, on average, we spend nine hours per day sitting down.

  • That's about sixty percent of our waking life.

  • So, remember to take regular breaks, even just a minute or two.

  • OK, let's recap the vocabulary we've learnt.

  • Starting with to engineer something out,

  • meaning to design or plan in such a way

  • that something is no longer needed. The phrase 'this much' or 'so much' means

  • in such large amounts.

  • Blood circulation is the movement of blood

  • through the heart and blood vessels which carries oxygen around the body.

  • If things are geared around a certain activity or purpose,

  • they're organised to support it. The idiom to swim against the tide

  • means to not follow what most people are doing.

  • And finally, to drive someone towards a new situation means to push them

  • towards accepting it. Once again,

  • our six minutes are up.

  • Remember to join us again next time

  • for more topical discussion and useful vocabulary here at 6 Minute.

  • English. Goodbye for now.

  • Bye.

Hello. This is 6 Minute

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A2 初級

Why sitting is bad for health ⏲️ 6 Minute English

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    英文探長J に公開 2024 年 05 月 08 日
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