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  • - I have been fascinated with the hippocampus

  • for many, many years.

  • I started in 1998 as a young assistant professor

  • at New York University studying the hippocampus

  • to make a big splash in science

  • and discover something really, really amazing.

  • So, I decided that I was just gonna work.

  • For six years, I was only gonna work,

  • trying to understand how the hippocampus forms new memories.

  • I didn't have a lot of social relationships.

  • I was eating too much takeout food.

  • I was just feeling so lethargic,

  • and that is what brought me to the gym.

  • And a year and a half later, I felt so good.

  • And I had this amazing realization:

  • my memory, my hippocampal dependent memory

  • that I was studying in my own lab, that seemed to be better.

  • Maybe it was this new level of physical activity

  • that was causing this really extraordinary change,

  • that my writing was going better.

  • That was the first moment

  • that I started seriously getting interested

  • in how exercise might be affecting the brain

  • and also helping the hippocampus.

  • My name is Wendy Suzuki.

  • I'm Dean of the College of Arts and Science

  • at New York University

  • and Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology.

  • Because I studied the effects of exercise on the brain,

  • people always wanna ask me about the 'runner's high.'

  • What is it? How do you get it?

  • I don't run. I'm a terrible runner.

  • However, it's a great place to start,

  • because what it really is,

  • is this feeling of euphoria that comes with running.

  • But here's the good news:

  • You don't have to be a marathon runner to get this.

  • Every single time you move your body,

  • you are giving your brain what I like to call

  • "a wonderful bubble bath of neurochemicals"-

  • dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, endorphins.

  • And that's really key

  • to the mood-boosting effects of exercise.

  • But that's just the short-term effects.

  • What about long-term effects?

  • What if you give your brain a bubble bath

  • on a regular basis, for a week, or a month,

  • or several years?

  • That's when those 'growth factors' kick in.

  • And what do the growth factors do?

  • We know that the growth factors go directly

  • to two key brain areas.

  • One is the hippocampus.

  • The hippocampus is an extraordinary structure.

  • It is one of the only human brain areas

  • that can grow brand new brain cells in adulthood.

  • And those growth factors help the hippocampus grow shiny,

  • new hippocampal cells.

  • And what does that mean?

  • Your memory is better.

  • And the second is the prefrontal cortex,

  • critical for your ability to shift and focus attention.

  • Those are some of the both immediate

  • and long-term changes that you get with exercise,

  • that start with that neurochemical bubble bath.

  • You don't have to become a marathon runner

  • or a triathlete to get these benefits.

  • You might say, "Oh, well, I'm in the sedentary camp,

  • there's no hope for me."

  • Here's why there's hope for everybody:

  • And that is the principle of brain plasticity.

  • Brain plasticity is this idea

  • that the brain has an extraordinary capacity

  • to change or modify its wiring.

  • Are you walking a lot? Are you running?

  • Are you keeping yourself physically active?

  • Are you learning new things?

  • With brain plasticity,

  • even if you've been sedentary all your life,

  • you can start moving towards that bigger,

  • fatter, fluffier, and happier brain.

  • I love to advocate for personal experimentation.

  • You know the science now,

  • that you're giving your brain a bubble bath,

  • it's gonna make your focus work better,

  • it's gonna improve your mood.

  • When are you gonna apply it in your life?

  • My motivational tip for everybody is start small

  • and start with things you already know you like.

  • If you hate running, don't run.

  • You don't have to run.

  • As little as 10 minutes of walking

  • will start to give you immediate benefits

  • in terms of decreasing anxiety levels,

  • decreasing depression levels.

  • Anybody can do that.

  • You don't even have to change into your spandex.

  • Or start practically.

  • One of the things that I did over the pandemic

  • is I turned my weekly cleaning session

  • into an exercise session.

  • Have you ever seen that movie, "Mrs. Doubtfire"?

  • Have you ever tried to do that choreography

  • that Robin Williams did with the vacuum cleaner?

  • It is hard.

  • It is a great aerobic workout.

  • And if you bring that play and that joy

  • to even scrubbing the bathtub, it makes it more fun,

  • it makes it more aerobic.

  • Start small, and then just add on.

  • Can you walk a little bit more?

  • Can you park a little bit farther away?

  • Can you do another round of shopping

  • with the big cart in Costco?

  • Be more broad in your definition

  • of bringing more movement into your life.

- I have been fascinated with the hippocampus

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The #1 way to strengthen your mind is to use your body | Wendy Suzuki(The #1 way to strengthen your mind is to use your body | Wendy Suzuki)

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    happynostalgia2 に公開 2023 年 08 月 18 日
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