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  • Claudia: The queen of afternoon tea

  • served with scones and strawberry jam,

  • clotted cream is sometimes confused with butter

  • for its thick, rich texture.

  • While it contains some butterfat (a lot of it, actually),

  • clotted cream isn't churned, as butter would be.

  • Instead, its butterfat is separated slowly,

  • following a precise, lengthy process that here in Cornwall

  • has been passed down over generations.

  • We're in Ruan Minor, Cornwall,

  • and today we're going to find out

  • how clotted cream is made.

  • I can't wait to taste it.

  • Let's go see how it's made.

  • Just by looking at it,

  • it has the consistency of ice cream.

  • It looks a bit like ice cream.

  • Claire: It does.

  • Claudia: The texture of butter.

  • Claire: Yeah, it does, yeah.

  • And the taste of cream.

  • Claire: Cream, yeah. Claudia: Of, like, milk cream.

  • Claire: Yes, yeah.

  • Claudia: So, it's really these three things together.

  • Claire: And all come from milk.

  • Very clever product, milk.

  • Claudia: Yeah. Claire: It is.

  • Claudia: And how did that clever milk

  • turn into such a product?

  • Well, clotted cream starts with fresh milk

  • that is pasteurized at 63 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes.

  • This temperature is ideal to preserve its creamy flavor

  • without burning it.

  • It is then cooled down to no more than 36 degrees

  • to force the milk to separate into fat and liquid.

  • The next step is to pour it into the separator,

  • which skims the cream from the milk.

  • So, how much milk are you putting here in the separator?

  • Claire: This is probably 35 liters of whole milk going in.

  • It's usually 1 liter of cream to 12 liters of milk.

  • Claudia: Oh, all right.

  • That's really small. Claire: Yeah.

  • Claudia: But you still want to make something out of it.

  • Claire: Yeah, it is the cream of the crop,

  • if you know what I mean.

  • Literally. Claudia: Yeah, yeah, it is.

  • Claire: The best part of it.

  • It's not easy to get it right.

  • Claudia: Yeah, why is that?

  • Claire: Well, I think it's the temperature.

  • When you process the milk as well,

  • to make sure you actually start separating it

  • at the right temperature, the right consistency of cream.

  • My uncle used to sell his own cream,

  • and he taught me that if the cream will stick to your thumb,

  • that's the right consistency.

  • If it falls off, it's not going to be any good.

  • Claudia: It's not good, because it means

  • there's still a little bit of milk in there?

  • Claire: That's right, yeah.

  • Claudia: You don't want any of that.

  • Claire: You'll be working with me in a minute.

  • Claudia: This is your test.

  • Oh, it looks like nail polish.

  • Claire: That's good.

  • Claudia: The separation is done twice

  • to get the richest cream possible.

  • Once the separator is off,

  • Claire takes it apart to explain to me how it works.

  • Here you can see a series of disks.

  • When the machine is on,

  • they spin and push the skimmed milk through these holes,

  • while the cream, which is heavier, flows to the bottom.

  • Claire: As each particle of milk goes through,

  • these spin at such a rate, each one of them,

  • that all the cream -- Claudia: Oh, there's many.

  • Claire: Yeah, there's loads.

  • See, they all are separated, coming off like that.

  • We obviously take the milk off every time we use them,

  • but there's a lot of fat as well that's kept

  • in here.

  • Claudia: Oh!

  • Claire: It's probably really good for your skin.

  • [both laugh]

  • It's like a moisturizer.

  • Claudia: The fresh cream is then poured into little pots.

  • By skimming the milk twice, what we've got is double cream.

  • To become clotted cream,

  • it will need to be left to set for 12 hours in the fridge.

  • During this time, the thickest part of the cream

  • rises to the surface, creating clots.

  • Claire: Which will make it clotted cream.

  • Claudia: Oh, I see.

  • So that's why it's called clotted cream.

  • Claire: You cook the clots, yeah, you cook the clots,

  • and the cream underneath should be runny

  • compared to the top, so you have that lovely crust.

  • Claudia: Oh, I see. So this is the way to go,

  • and it is a very lengthy process.

  • Claire: It is, yes, definitely.

  • It's well worth waiting for.

  • Claudia: Look nice and bubbly.

  • Claire: They do, yeah.

  • Claudia: After spending the night in the fridge,

  • the pots are ready to be cooked.

  • Claire tells me she's found the perfect temperature

  • and baking time to be 85 degrees Celsius

  • for one hour and 30 minutes.

  • This allows her to give the cream a nice crust

  • without overcooking it.

  • Ooh.

  • Claire: What you want is that lovely crust.

  • Claudia: Yeah, it has a crust.

  • Claire: You see it cracking there?

  • And then it's just about right to put on that lovely scone.

  • Make sure you have the crust on top.

  • This is a good consistency because you've got --

  • the underneath isn't too runny.

  • It won't run off your scone.

  • Claudia: Yeah.

  • Claire: Teeth will sink right into it.

  • OK. It's my turn now.

  • I'm not going to get a spoon as big as yours.

  • Claire: Keep the crust. Make sure -- there you go.

  • Cheers.

  • Cheers.

  • Mm.

  • That was ...

  • felt it.

  • Yeah, you do feel it.

  • You definitely need a scone to go with it.

  • Yeah, you're not supposed to eat it like that.

  • You're not really meant to eat it on its own.

  • Unfortunately, Claire had to run

  • to bottle the rest of the fresh milk of the day,

  • so I sat down with Margaret,

  • the owner of the farm, to enjoy clotted cream

  • the most traditional way possible,

  • in an afternoon tea, or cream tea,

  • as it's called here in Cornwall.

  • The clotted cream is paired with strawberry jam

  • and scones that Margaret herself made

  • with some leftover buttermilk.

  • While spreading cream and jam on your scone

  • may look like the most natural thing,

  • the order in which you do it has long been the subject

  • of one of the biggest culinary debates in the UK.

  • Which way should I start?

  • Because I know here there are a lot of rules

  • on how to approach this, and I could be persecuted

  • if I put one thing before the other.

  • Have your scone.

  • And then, in Cornwall,

  • you always put some jam on it first.

  • OK, so first the jam. All right.

  • Yes.

  • Claudia: Why would you put the jam first and the cream last?

  • Margaret: Well, it's what we've always done here,

  • but I think if you put the jam in,

  • then you put as much cream on as you like, can't you?

  • It is nice.

  • Have a nice big one.

  • Claudia: That's enough, eh? The whole thing?

  • Margaret: Yes, at least that much.

  • Claudia: At least! Oh, gosh.

  • Margaret: Yeah.

  • Claudia: It's quite a lot, huh?

  • Very good, this cream.

  • Margaret: Nice. Claudia: Mm.

  • Oh, I can see why you put this for last,

  • because it's really what stays there in your mouth.

  • When you have it, and you just have it

  • on the top of your lips.

  • Very, very good.

  • I like the scones as well, homemade by you.

  • Yeah, I really like them.

  • Nice and soft and crumbly in the core.